Jose Reyes

Jose Reyes

“The Artistry of Freddie Hubbard” is featured and about John Gilmore

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An exceptional album that truly exemplifies Freddie Hubbard’s artistry on the trumpet. Considered to me as one of the best Jazz trumpet in the history of this improvised art form. Not to mention, Freddie Hubbard also was another important contributor to the evolution of Jazz from Bebop to contemporary classic Jazz. Besides having Curtis Fuller, Tommy Flanagan, Art Davis and Louis Hayes to help record this beauty, there was John Gilmore on tenor. Gilmore is mentioned below but I added a pretty detailed biography (New York Times-Obituary) and placed it after the description. Gilmore was an intricate part of the Sun Ra Arkestra, which I will be featuring in the near future. Not to get away from the featured album here, “The Artistry of Freddie Hubbard,” the Jazz Con Class Radio listeners will enjoy the leadership and command of Freddie Hubbard on this 1962 recording. Check the schedule link for play times.

About the album:

Digitally remastered by Erick Labson (MCA Music Media Studios). This 1962 effort was Freddie Hubbard’s first recording under his own name for Impulse! Fellow Jazz Messenger Curtis Fuller and newcomer John Gilmore color the proceedings with added trombone and tenor saxophone, respectively. These rock-solid post-bop horn players are backed by the formidable rhythm section of Tommy Flanagan on piano, Art Davis on bass, and Louis Hayes on drums. Hubbard’s shimmering style and clear tone show a clear debt to the late Clifford Brown and a nod to the bold sonic curiosity of John Coltrane. These are some hot young players pushing a classic format forward. The opening track is Duke Ellington’s intoxicating “Caravan.” The horns play the theme loosely above the dark undercurrent of Davis’ and Hayes’ playing. The piece explodes into a Hubbard solo that shows why he was the most talked-about young trumpeter of that era. The exceptional……Read More

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John Gilmore Biography (New York Times-Obituary):

John Gilmore, a tenor saxophonist who helped define the sound of the avant-garde during four decades with the Sun Ra Arkestra, died on Sunday at Germantown Hospital in Philadelphia. He was 63 and lived in Philadelphia.

The cause was emphysema, said Danny Thompson, a longtime baritone saxophonist with the band.

Mr. Gilmore was one of the pioneers of the fierce, screaming, overblown solos that were an essential part of the 1960’s avant-garde, in particular a major influence on John Coltrane. Because he was a sideman rather than a band leader, his efforts were often overlooked by non-musicians. But he was an integral part of a watershed change in 1960’s jazz, and a stirring soloist throughout his years with the Arkestra.

Mr. Gilmore was born in Summit, Miss., and grew up in Chicago. He began playing clarinet at 14, and performed in bands while serving in the Air Force from 1948 to 1951. He played in a group led by Earl Hines in 1952, and in 1953 joined a trio led by Sun Ra. The trio quickly grew into a big band, billed as the Myth-Science Arkestra or the Solar Arkestra, and played music that ranged from straightforward swing-band arrangements to percussion ensembles, chants about outer space and early free jazz……Learn More

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