Jose Reyes

Jose Reyes

Debut of “Hard Bop Sunday”

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HardBopSunday

Starting this Sunday April 7th, I will begin featuring a straight six hours of Hard Bop Jazz and will appropriately call it “Hard Bop Sunday.” I will change the beginning time every Sunday so it could be listened to on prime-time from any part of the planet. There are an average of 90 countries that tune in to Jazz Con Class on a monthly basis and all because it is on 24 hours/7 days a week. Check the schedule link for play times. Enjoy!

Here are several great interpretations/explanations of Hard Bop (Wikipedia):

Hard bop is a style of jazz that is an extension of bebop (or “bop”) music. Journalists and record companies began using the term in the mid-1950s to describe a new current within jazz which incorporated influences from rhythm and blues, gospel music, and blues, especially in saxophone and piano playing.

David H. Rosenthal contends in his book Hard Bop that the genre is, to a large degree, the natural creation of a generation of African-American musicians who grew up at a time when bop and rhythm and blues were the dominant forms of black American music. Prominent hard bop musicians included Horace Silver, Art Blakey, Cannonball Adderley, Miles Davis and Tadd Dameron.

Hard bop is sometimes referred to as “funky hard bop.” The “funky” label refers to the rollicking, rhythmic feeling associated with the style.[3] The descriptor is also used to describe soul jazz, which is commonly associated with hard bop.[1][3] According to Mark C. Gridley, soul jazz more specifically refers to music with “an earthy, bluesy melodic concept and… repetitive, dance-like rhythms…. Note that some listeners make no distinction between ‘soul-jazz’ and ‘funky hard bop,’ and many musicians don’t consider ‘soul-jazz’ to be continuous with ‘hard bop.’ The term “soul” suggests the church, and traditional gospel music elements such as “amen chords” (the plagal cadence) and triadic harmonies seemed to suddenly appear in jazz during the era.

History

According to Nat Hentoff in his 1957 liner notes for the Art Blakey Columbia LP entitled Hard Bop, the phrase “hard bop” was originated by author-critic-pianist John Mehegan, jazz reviewer of the New York Herald Tribune at that time. Hard bop first developed in the mid-1950s, and is generally seen as originating with The Jazz Messengers, a quartet led by pianist Horace Silver and drummer Art Blakey. Some saw hard bop as a response to cool jazz and west coast jazz. As Paul Tanner, Maurice Gerow, and David Megill explain, “the hard bop school… saw the new instrumentation and compositional devices used by cool musicians as gimmicks rather than valid developments of the jazz tradition.” However, Shelly Manne suggested that cool jazz and hard bop simply reflected their respective geographic environments: the relaxed cool jazz style reflected a more relaxed….Read More

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"I appreciate Jazz Con Class Radio because I love bop, hard bop, and related jazz forms. I especially appreciate Jazz Con Class because of the great range of musicians and cuts that are played. Although I like to hear Miles Davis play So What and John Coltrane play My Favorite Things, familiar cuts like these are heard too often on other jazz stations. Unlike other jazz stations, Jazz Con Class Radio frequently surprises me with great music that is not so familiar to me. I love it. And I also love the absence of commercial interruptions.

Although I am not a musician or an authority on music, I teach a Bop seminar for first-year students at the University of California at Davis. In addition to hearing the music, the students learn about the musicians and urban culture in the 40s, 50s, and 60s. I often play Jazz Con Class Radio at the start and end of class meetings. The music is a wonderful gift. The station is also a wonderful gift."

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