Jose Reyes

Jose Reyes

“Olé Coltrane” is featured

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Here’s another exploratory album by John Coltrane (Soprano and Tenor Sax) along with the invaluable Eric Dolphy (Alto Sax and Flute), two bassists (Reggie Workman and Art Davis), Freddie Hubbard (Trumpet) and Elvin Jones (Drums). Overall they produce a rather relax sound that doesn’t let up and keeps the listener interested from begging to end. “Ole Coltrane” was recorded, in studio, May 25, 1961 and will be featured for a couple weeks exclusively for the Jazz Con Class listeners. Check the schedule link for play times, enjoy!

About the album:

Having explored all sorts of country cousins of the blues, John Coltrane evokes the spirit of mother Africa and Moorish Spain on this, his final Atlantic recording. Fellow crusaders McCoy Tyner and Elvin Jones are joined by Reggie Workman as well as fellow bass virtuoso Art Davis, while Trane’s new front-line collaborator Eric Dolphy and trumpeter Freddie Hubbard give him an immense sonic canvas upon which to reinvent jazz. OLE COLTRANE extends the forms, anticipating the freedom and far reaching spiritual pilgrimages of the Impulse! years. Miles’ KIND OF BLUE and the music of Ornette Coleman suggested new improvisational possibilities. For Trane, they represented a way out of his harmonic labyrynth, a pursuit of simpler, more expressive modalities–offering even greater rhythmic/melodic complexity. “Ole” is electrifying, one of Coltrane’s greatest collective achievements. Elvin Jones’ hypnotic six-beat cymbal pulse, the strummed ostinatos of Workman and Davis, and Tyner’s murmuring chordal drone form a syncopated wall of sound–equal parts Iberian dance, desert sirocco and evening raga……..Read More

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