Jose Reyes

Jose Reyes

Featured album: It’s Time! with Jackie McLean and Charles Tolliver, Modal Jazz meets Free Jazz?

Share on facebook
Facebook

Recorded in 1964 this album “It’s Time” was surely ahead of it’s time, as you will understand further when reading the description below. Although it states, “walks the line between modal post-bop and free jazz”, I disagree. It is a combination of both jazz styles but it is very balanced and works great! Drummer Roy Haynes helps keep it blended together and allows both Jazz styles (Free Jazz and Modal Jazz) to make sense. If anything, its more of an Avant-Garde type of jazz style and if the Jazz Con Class listeners here would like to listen to Free Jazz specifically, then they should check the playlist link and find out when that particular playlists airs. Outstanding musicianship by all 5 Jazz masters, great stuff! Check the schedule link, listen to album and be the judge, enjoy!

About this album:

Recorded in 1964, Jackie McLean’s It’s Time was only available on CD in the United States as part of a four-disc Mosaic set of his complete Blue Note recordings between 1964-1966. The band here includes trumpeter Charles Tolliver, pianist Herbie Hancock, bassist Cecil McBee, and drummer Roy Haynes. The music was written entirely by either Tolliver or McLean and walks the line between modal post-bop and free jazz. It came hot on the heels of McLean’s first forays into these waters on 1963’s One Step Beyond and Destination Out!. There is more to it than that, of course; chordal improvisation still plays a large part in the music on this fine record. Hancock’s solo on the opening “Cancellation” is the most angular thing here, and the tempo is simply breathtaking. McLean’s butt funky “Das’ Dat,” which follows, owes a debt to Horace Silver to be sure, but the blues element, which is in the tune’s head, is pure Jackie McLean. McLean’s own playing isn’t particularly adventurous, though he pushes his tone to the limits at times……Learn More

More on Roy Haynes:

A veteran drummer long overshadowed by others, but finally in the 1990s gaining recognition for his talents and versatility, Roy Haynes has been a major player for half a century. He worked early on with the Sabby Lewis big band, Frankie Newton, Luis Russell (1945-1947), and Lester Young (1947-1949). After some engagements with Kai Winding, Haynes was a member of the Charlie Parker Quintet (1949-1952); he also recorded during this era with Bud Powell, Wardell Gray, and Stan Getz. Haynes toured the world with Sarah Vaughan (1953-1958); played with Thelonious Monk in 1958; led his own group; and gigged with George Shearing, Lennie Tristano, Eric Dolphy, and Getz (1961). He was Elvin Jones’ occasional substitute with John Coltrane’s classic quartet during 1961-1965, toured with Getz (1965-1967), and was with Gary Burton (1967-1968). In addition to touring with Chick Corea (1981 and 1984) and Pat Metheny (1989-1990), Haynes has led his own Hip Ensemble on and off during the past several decades…..Learn More 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

More to Explore

Klook and Francy

Kenny “Klook” Clarke and Francois “Francy” Boland are considered the pioneers of the “modern” Jazz big band. Their sexy cool sound had

Read More »

Happy New Year 2021

I would like to wish ALL you “Jazz Aficionados/Connoisseurs” and Jazz Con Class Radio fans a Happy 2021 New Year from the

Read More »

"I appreciate Jazz Con Class Radio because I love bop, hard bop, and related jazz forms. I especially appreciate Jazz Con Class because of the great range of musicians and cuts that are played. Although I like to hear Miles Davis play So What and John Coltrane play My Favorite Things, familiar cuts like these are heard too often on other jazz stations. Unlike other jazz stations, Jazz Con Class Radio frequently surprises me with great music that is not so familiar to me. I love it. And I also love the absence of commercial interruptions.

Although I am not a musician or an authority on music, I teach a Bop seminar for first-year students at the University of California at Davis. In addition to hearing the music, the students learn about the musicians and urban culture in the 40s, 50s, and 60s. I often play Jazz Con Class Radio at the start and end of class meetings. The music is a wonderful gift. The station is also a wonderful gift."

- Bruce Jaffee-California (USA)

"Jazz Con Class is a wonderful discovery. I never have to change it because each tune is selected so carefully. It lifts my spirits and at the same time teaches me about a side of music I otherwise wouldn't have exposure to. This is honest, real music and I'm glad to have the chance to listen to it."

- J.J.- Virginia (USA)

"This is exactly the kind of radio station I've ever wished for, since I learned to love jazz music. Please keep going like this for as long as possible!"

- Felix-(Germany)
css.php
The 2021 "Free From All" Fundraiser has begun! Please help support against commercialism and HELP to KEEP JAZZ ALIVE, Thank You! Learn More
Hello. Add your message here.