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Jose Reyes

The Future of Jazz in the 60’s and Freddie Hubbard’s first 4 recordings

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The year of 1960 was a pinnacle time for Jazz music and it’s future. Things were looking up as the Hard Bop era that had begun more or less in the mid 50’s was in full steam and with no sign of decreasing it’s incredible pace in the near future. Everything was looking up for the future of Jazz except for one very important element that would help sustain it through the 60’s and beyond. There was a small concern about the already established musicians and it had to do with age. We’re talking about those who lead the charge and took Jazz a step further from its Bebop roots,  they were getting older and needed some new young talent to continue on the tradition they had created. Hard Bop needed to extend itself so it could reach another level and to be more precise, another dimension. This is where Freddie Hubbard comes into the picture, alongside a creative crop of very young talented Jazz musicians. These young studs happened to be available and well trained by the older legendary Jazz greats. Freddie Hubbard sure made an enormous splash with his very first 4 albums he recorded as a leader. These albums in order were “Open Sesame,” “Goin’ Up,” “Hub Cap” and “Ready For Freddie.” He recorded these albums at the tender age of 22 and 23, respectively in 1960 and 1961. These 4 albums not only catapulted him to a higher status but also more importantly, ensured a bright future for Jazz music.

OpenSesamePostimage
The Future of Jazz in the 60's and Freddie Hubbard's first 4 recordings 7

“Open Sesame” was the first of these 4 albums that I’m featuring here and it was recorded on June 19, 1960 at Rudy Van Gelder’s famous recording studio located in Englewood, New Jersey. It is Freddie Hubbard’s “official” debut album and featured a host of legendary Jazz musicians, learn more.

Here’s “One Mint Julep” :

 

 

GoinUpPostImage
The Future of Jazz in the 60's and Freddie Hubbard's first 4 recordings 8

“Goin’ Up” was recorded on November 6, 1960 at Van Gelder’s studio as well and was released the following year, 1960. It is a more traditional Hard Bop recording that featured Freedie Hubbard on Trumpet, Hank Mobley on Tenor Sax, McCoy Tyner on Piano, Paul Chambers on Bass and Philly Joe Jones on Drums.

The year of 1960 was a pinnacle time for Jazz music and it’s future. Things were looking up as the Hard Bop era that had begun more or less in the mid 50’s was in full steam and with no sign of decreasing it’s incredible pace in the near future. Everything was looking up for the future of Jazz except for one very important element that would help sustain it through the 60’s and beyond. There was a small concern about the already established musicians and it had to do with age. We’re talking about those who lead the charge and took Jazz a step further from its Bebop roots,  they were getting older and needed some new young talent to continue on the tradition they had created. Hard Bop needed to extend itself so it could reach another level and to be more precise, another dimension. This is where Freddie Hubbard comes into the picture, alongside a creative crop of very young talented Jazz musicians. These young studs happened to be available and well trained by the older legendary Jazz greats. Freddie Hubbard sure made an enormous splash with his very first 4 albums he recorded as a leader. These albums in order were “Open Sesame,” “Goin’ Up,” “Hub Cap” and “Ready For Freddie.” He recorded these albums at the tender age of 22 and 23, respectively in 1960 and 1961. These 4 albums not only catapulted him to a higher status but also more importantly, ensured a bright future for Jazz music.

OpenSesamePostimage
The Future of Jazz in the 60's and Freddie Hubbard's first 4 recordings 9

“Open Sesame” was the first of these 4 albums that I’m featuring here and it was recorded on June 19, 1960 at Rudy Van Gelder’s famous recording studio located in Englewood, New Jersey. It is Freddie Hubbard’s “official” debut album and featured a host of legendary Jazz musicians, learn more.

Here’s “One Mint Julep”:

 

 

 

GoinUpPostImage
The Future of Jazz in the 60's and Freddie Hubbard's first 4 recordings 10

“Goin’ Up” was recorded on November 6, 1960 at Van Gelder’s studio as well and was released the following year, 1960. It is a more traditional Hard Bop recording that featured Freedie Hubbard on Trumpet, Hank Mobley on Tenor Sax, McCoy Tyner on Piano, Paul Chambers on Bass and Philly Joe Jones on Drums.

The year of 1960 was a pinnacle time for Jazz music and it’s future. Things were looking up as the Hard Bop era that had begun more or less in the mid 50’s was in full steam and with no sign of decreasing it’s incredible pace in the near future. Everything was looking up for the future of Jazz except for one very important element that would help sustain it through the 60’s and beyond. There was a small concern about the already established musicians and it had to do with age. We’re talking about those who lead the charge and took Jazz a step further from its Bebop roots,  they were getting older and needed some new young talent to continue on the tradition they had created. Hard Bop needed to extend itself so it could reach another level and to be more precise, another dimension. This is where Freddie Hubbard comes into the picture, alongside a creative crop of very young talented Jazz musicians. These young studs happened to be available and well trained by the older legendary Jazz greats. Freddie Hubbard sure made an enormous splash with his very first 4 albums he recorded as a leader. These albums in order were “Open Sesame,” “Goin’ Up,” “Hub Cap” and “Ready For Freddie.” He recorded these albums at the tender age of 22 and 23, respectively in 1960 and 1961. These 4 albums not only catapulted him to a higher status but also more importantly, ensured a bright future for Jazz music.

OpenSesamePostimage
The Future of Jazz in the 60's and Freddie Hubbard's first 4 recordings 11

“Open Sesame” was the first of these 4 albums that I’m featuring here and it was recorded on June 19, 1960 at Rudy Van Gelder’s famous recording studio located in Englewood, New Jersey. It is Freddie Hubbard’s “official” debut album and featured a host of legendary Jazz musicians, learn more.

Here’s “

GoinUpPostImage
The Future of Jazz in the 60's and Freddie Hubbard's first 4 recordings 12

“Goin’ Up” was recorded on November 6, 1960 at Van Gelder’s studio as well and was released the following year, 1960. It is a more traditional Hard Bop recording that featured Freedie Hubbard on Trumpet, Hank Mobley on Tenor Sax, McCoy Tyner on Piano, Paul Chambers on Bass and Philly Joe Jones on Drums.

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