Jose Reyes

Jose Reyes

About the Historic Max Roach-Clifford Brown California Concerts 1954

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This was a great find for me and the Jazz Con Class Radio listeners will love it! It’s Completely “Live” and taken from two separate 1954 concerts from the “California Club” in Los Angeles, on April and August (See here on JazzDisco.org). Max Roach and Clifford Brown recorded quite a bit in California and in turn, helped established the bluesy East Coast style of Hard Bop to the West Coast. Their interpretation of “Jordu” is outstanding! All the selections do praise Clifford Brown but Teddy Edwards on the tenor, who is unknown to many, is incredible as well. No need to tell anyone about Max Roach’s performance in this recording, they know the answer already! “The Historic California Concerts 1954” recording will be added to the G4 Playlist because it’s live. I must have heard this album about 10 times already and it only gets better every time, enjoy!

About the album:

Jazz historian Robert Gordon in his book Jazz West Coast writes that there was considerable editing on the two 1954 California Concerts when they were released on record on the GNP label. This editing refers mainly to the tenor saxophone and piano solos. On comparing the original releases, we have also found an additional 35 seconds of Clifford Brown’s trumpet solo on “Tenderly”, which has been included here. We are also pleased to present the spoken introductions by Gene Norman and Max Roach from the first date.

Regrettably, the solos of both Teddy Edwards and Carl Perkins on “All God’s Chillun Got Rhythm” were.originally edited to one chorus each. This is the only available example of this recording. The full version has not been located and, half a century later, may be considered lost…….Read More

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Teddy Edwards Biography:

THEODORE MARCUS “TEDDY” EDWARDS was born on April 26, 1924 in Jackson, Mississippi to a musical family. His grandfather, Henry C. Reed, played the bass and his father, Bruce Edwards, trombone, violin and reed instruments. Under these circumstances it was quite obvious that Teddy started to play very young, at first alto saxophone and later clarinet.

Being talented as he was, he was able to play his first professional job at the age of twelve with Doc Parmley and his “Royal Mississippians.” Later he played with the Don Dunbar Orchestra and The Paul Gayten Sizzling Six.

His uncle, Frenod Reed, sent for him to come to Detroit to live because he felt he would have better opportunities to develop his talents. Immediately he began working up and down the ill-famed Hastings Street and played with musicians such as the legendary George E. Lee, Hank Jones, Wardell Grey, Big Nick Nicholas and the great alto saxophone player, Teddy Buckner, of Jimmy Lunceford fame and many others.

Due to illness in the family, he went back to Jackson and ventured to Alexandria, Louisiana with Bolden Townsends’ group. After Bolden was drafted for the army the rest of the group agreed Teddy should be the leader. With this group he went to Tampa, Florida to work at the Watts Saunders Blue Room. Some of the members of the Ernie Fields Orchestra heard him play there and went back to the hotel where Ernie Fields Orchestra was stopping and insisted that he come over to hear Teddy play and try to persuade him to join them. Teddy had plans to go to New York after completing the Blue Room engagement. Ernie suggested that Teddy join them because there were due to play Washington, D.C. soon and he could work that far with them and then he could leave from there to New York. But instead, he ended up at the Club Alabam on Central Avenue in Los Angeles, which later became his residence…..Learn More

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