Jose Reyes

Jose Reyes

“Charlie Parker with Strings” is the perfect example and proves the point

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Charlie Parker was known as the king of improvisation and changed the whole sound of Jazz. His style of playing began the era of Bebop while Swing was the main choice of Jazz fans. His quick double speed of playing the saxophone was criticized and ridiculed as plain nonsense. For this reason, Charlie Parker had to make these sessions of standards with the inclusion of violins. He had to prove a point to those skeptics that were just not hip enough. These recordings, “Charlie Parker with Strings” was the perfect example to finally open the eyes of all those “Pop Music” brainwashed Americans who simply didn’t get it. Well, it worked and this album was Parker’s best selling work, believe it or not. This album is good to have handy when someone new to Jazz questions or is confused with the improvisational element that Charlie Parker brought to Jazz and finally freed the musician (any musician) from all the restraints that can hamper his or her musical development. After listening to these recording sessions, all these confused listeners will finally understand Bebop and will realize that Charlie Parker was a genius. I will feature this album for a week or so, check the schedule link for play times.

About the album:

Recorded in New York between December 1947 and 1952. Includes liner notes by Joe Goldberg and Norman Granz. This is an expanded version of the early-’50s album that broadened Charlie Parker’s audience by focusing on the beautiful lyricism of his playing. These recordings feature Parker’s alto saxophone over a gorgeous bed of strings, but perhaps an even more significant departure is the fact that he simplified his phrasing. His wondrously uncurling ribbons of notes are supplanted by the confident ease with which he embraces each of these melodies, dancing through and around them and never losing their essential character. On an album of back-to-back standouts, “April in Paris” is a towering beauty. Comprised primarily of what were–or have since become–standards, this is as fine a place as any to see exactly why Parker is perhaps the preeminent improviser in the history of jazz……..Read More

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