Currently viewing the tag: "Wayne Shorter"

WayningMomentsCover

Wow! Absolutely one of the sweetest sounding jazz albums I’ve ever heard. “Wayning Moments” was released in 1962 and features Wayne Shorter, Freddie Hubbard, pianist Eddie Higgins, bassist Jymie Merritt and drummer Marshall Thompson. The 15 songs ( 8 unique and 7 in different takes) are played with a constant smoothness, no real high pitch out-of the-ordinary swings at all. Truly sweet, enjoy!

About the album:

WAYNING MOMENTS is Wayne Shorter’s third and final release for Vee Jay, the label where he started his solo career. At this time, it was by far his most expansive release, covering a broad range of musical ground. It also expands further on Shorter’s gifts as a composer as he inches closer to the fully mature style for which he would become legendary. It is at this time, however, that we find Shorter, still a member of Art Blakey’s Jazz Messengers, coming into his own as a prime mover of the tenor saxophone in the hard bop era. Shorter is joined by fellow Messengers Freddie Hubbard and Jymie Merritt, both in excellent…..Read More

veejayrecordlabel

About Vee Jay Records:

Vee-Jay Records. In cold, hard facts, Vee-Jay was founded in Gary, Indiana in 1953 by Vivian Carter and James C. Bracken (later that year, Mr. & Mrs. Bracken), who used their first initials for the label’s name. The first song they ever recorded made it to the top ten of the national rhythm & blues charts. In a short time, Vee-Jay was the most successful black- owned record company in the United States. By 1963, they were charting records faster than some of the major labels. They were the first U.S. company to have the Beatles. In one month alone in early 1964, they sold 2.6 million Beatles singles. Two years later, the company was bankrupt.

So much for cold, hard facts. The trouble with these facts is that they really don’t tell the story. It’s not a story of a small business that becomes a giant corporation; rather, it’s the collective stories of the people involved. I talked to several of the key Vee-Jay people during January and February, 1981. What follows is their story…….Read More

SpeakNoEvilCover

I stunned myself the other day when I realized that I didn’t have Wayne Shorter’s “Speak no Evil”  in my personal music library. I do have his Blue Note Recordings and there are three songs from Speak No Evil in there and Jazz Con Class radio rotation. I have added the ones that were not and now it is complete. This is of course, another top-notch Wayne Shorter recording and featuring four legends as his sidekicks, Freddie Hubbard, Herbie Hancock, Ron Carter and Elvin Jones. This 1965 album is actually considered to be Hard Bop as mentioned in all the places I researched it on but it doesn’t sound exactly like this to me. It’s right there on the border line with the Hard Bop swing but itching to cross over to the Avant-Garde side every time you hear Wayne Shorters’ tenor sax sound off. Either way, its a real classic and a must have.

About the album:

The Rudy Van Gelder Edition of SPEAK NO EVIL includes an essay by Bob Blumenthal. This is part of the Blue Note Rudy Van Gelder Editions series. SPEAK NO EVIL is a significant recording for two main reasons. Firstly, it is one of the first in a long string of stunning solo sessions by Shorter that showcase both his masterful saxophone abilities and his eclectic compositional style away from the leadership of Art Blakey and Miles Davis. Secondly, it combines members of the three mightiest ensembles of the period; Freddie Hubbard and Shorter worked together in Blakey’s Jazz Messengers, Shorter, Herbie Hancock and Ron Carter formed three fifths of Miles Davis’ legendary quintet and Elvin Jones was the drumming powerhouse behind John Coltrane’s famous group. Shorter introduces the session with the swinging “Witch Hunt,” a dynamic piece with many unexpected……Read More

TheSoothsayerCover

Its been for some time that a Wayne Shorter album was featured on Jazz Con Class, so I picked a real classic, “The Soothsayer.” Well, anything of Wayne Shorter is basically a masterpiece but this one in particular is considered to be one of the very first Avant-Garde albums recorded, 1965. Wayne Shorter is surrounded by musicians that had their own impact on the Avant-Garde era in the coming years and had already left an impression at a young ripe age during the Hard Bop era. I’m talking about Wayne Shorter (Tenor), Freddie Hubbard (Trumpet), McCoy Tyner (Piano), Ron Carter (Bass) and Tony Williams(Drums). I can go on adding more about this album but I’ll let it do the talking for me. There aren’t really any words to totally describe how good this album is. Soothsayer will be featured for a week or so, check the schedule link for play times.

About the album:

With THE SOOTHSAYER, Wayne Shorter fronts a large ensemble for the first time in his solo endeavors. Like his previous sessions, Shorter’s assorted guests are drawn from the most notable groups of the time. McCoy Tyner from Coltrane’s quartet, rhythm-mates Ron Carter and Tony Williams from Shorter’s employer Miles Davis, and Freddie Hubbard who shared horn duties with the saxophonist in Art Blakey’s Jazz Messengers are all present, producing a huge sound lead by Shorter’s artistic vision. Also on board is alto saxophonist James Spaulding who is the perfect compliment to Shorter’s eclectic tenor. SOOTHSAYER is the fourth Blue Note…..Read More

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TheAllSeeingEyeFeature

Wayne Shorter’s classic album, The All Seeing Eye will be featured here for all the Jazz Con Class listeners to enjoy. This was a very advance album for 1964. It is categorized as an Avant-Guarde album and with a great supporting cast, James Spaulding (alto saxophone); Freddie Hubbard (trumpet, flugelhorn); Alan Shorter (flugelhorn); Grachan Moncur III (trombone); Herbie Hancock (piano); Joe Chambers (drums). A great album that can be considered to be Wayne Shorter’s best post Hard Bop and before Jazz Fusion success. Every tune is uniquely different from each other and takes its own special path of exploration. Check the schedule link for play times and enjoy!

About the album:

Digitally remastered using 24-bit technology by Rudy Van Gelder (2000, Van Gelder Studio, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey). This is part of the Blue Note Rudy Van Gelder Editions series. Wayne Shorter’s epic THE ALL SEEING EYE can be compared in character to John Coltrane’s A LOVE SUPREME. It is the culmination of the first leg of Shorter’s artistic journey, which began in earnest in 1964 with his first solo recordings for Blue Note. Like SUPREME, it is a deeply spiritual work, with both the album and song titles referring to God’s creation of the universe. Also, unlike his previous efforts, EYE marks the first time Shorter commanded such a large ensemble, a feature that would mark many future solo outings. Compositionally, Shorter takes daring leaps here, greatly expanding his freer modal style. Traditional forms are bent and stretched beyond recognition as themes and solos meld into a continuous stream, projecting moods and varying intensities that reflect the album’s subject. The large horn section creates a massive sound on ensemble passages and a great variety of interpretations in solo jaunts. Also part of Shorter’s design is the role of the rhythm section, more an ebbing whirlwind than strictly a supporting unit. THE ALL SEEING EYE is one of Wayne Shorter’s boldest and most successful efforts……Read More

There have been many combinations of Jazz musicians who have collaborated to make great albums, studio and/or live, this occurs very frequently with Jazz musicians. Its a great opportunity for them to interact and expand their talent even further. Not to mention, very challenging for them in an educational manner, since the improvisational nature of Jazz allows them to experiment with different sounds and techniques. These albums, which can be characterized as jam sessions, are the main reason why Jazz flourishes and only becomes better. I have put together a special playlist (Jazz presentation) on an incredible trumpet and tenor sax combination and which I feel, could possibly be the best ever! In my opinion, of course but I will make the effort and maybe I might just convince some of the listeners here on Jazz Con Class. Either way everyone will win! This dynamic dual consists of Lee Morgan (Trumpet) and Wayne Shorter (Tenor Sax). From 1959 they were playing together, thanks to Art Blakey and his Jazz Messengers project. The name of the album they first jammed together was “Africaine” and will be where this special playlist begins but there will be much more, as they recorded mostly together as Jazz Messengers. When Wayne Shorter released his debut album, “Introducing Wayne Shorter” Lee Morgan was there to add his support. Morgan and Shorter worked together on two albums after leaving the Jazz Messengers and continued working on their own as band leaders, creating the highest quality of Jazz possible, constantly innovating and most of all, establishing themselves as music writers. Two great improvisors that compromised themselves perfectly, outstanding stuff! The Jazz Con Class listeners are really going to love this presentation, check the schedule link for play times, Enjoy!

Here’s a great video of them playing together:

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