Currently viewing the tag: "John Coltrane"

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Here’s a not so mentioned recording sessions from 1959-60 and which took place in March 26, November 24, December 2nd of 1959 and October of 1960. “Coltrane Jazz” was released in 1961, learn more about the album and the reissues here. This album is a must-have and which contains many tunes that were not duplicated and/or improvised differently on other records. A great collection of outstanding classic songs that are, may I say, “leftovers” from other albums. Now there is no excuse, that the Jazz Con Class Radio listeners/readers know about it and are sort of forced to listen to it. Great album, buy it, you have to!

About the album:

Released shortly after the groundbreaking Giant Steps, Coltrane Jazz features a number of takes from the ‘Naima’ session, with Wynton Kelly, Paul Chambers and Jimmy Cobb, as well as a track with Cedar Walton and Lex Humphries and an early outing by his newly formed quartet featuring pianist McCoy Tyner, Steve Davis and Elvin Jones. While lacking the conceptual strength of many of Coltrane’s greatest works, Coltrane Jazz captures the saxophonist during one of his interesting periods of change, and includes some memorable original tunes. Particularly worth investigating…..Read More

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Here’s another great album from Coltrane where he teams up with McCoy Tyner and create a great foundation. The lively relentless drum work of Roy Haynes moves it to right direction and Garrison on Bass fills in all the gaps. This album is very similar in character as the “Crescent” album as they are only a year apart but much, more improvising by Coltrane. “Dear Old Stockholm” will be featured for a week or so, check the schedule link for play times, ENJOY!

Note: To complete the hour I added the song “Crescent” from the “Crescent” Album after the album feature completes.

About the album:

DEAR OLD STOCKHOLM gathers together studio sessions the Coltrane Quartet made with the great drummer Roy Haynes who was filling in for the remarkable Elvin Jones. “I always tried to get him when Elvin Jones wasn’t able to make it,” Coltrane explained. The resulting studio sessions, now gathered together on one disc for the first time, paint an intriguing sonic alternative to the great Coltrane Quartet of the ’60s. Where Elvin Jones’ is all rolling thunder and elemental energy, Haynes’ polyrhythmic style is more stacatto and jagged. What both drummers had in common was an uncanny intuition for orchestrating Coltrane’s epic melodic inventions, and setting up a freewheeling rhythmic counterpoint to his most complex…..Read More

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More on Roy Haynes:

A veteran drummer long overshadowed by others, but finally in the 1990s gaining recognition for his talents and versatility, Roy Haynes has been a major player for half a century. He worked early on with the Sabby Lewis big band, Frankie Newton, Luis Russell (1945-1947), and Lester Young (1947-1949). After some engagements with Kai Winding, Haynes was a member of the Charlie Parker Quintet (1949-1952); he also recorded during this era with Bud Powell, Wardell Gray, and Stan Getz. Haynes toured the world with Sarah Vaughan (1953-1958); played with Thelonious Monk in 1958; led his own group; and gigged with George Shearing, Lennie Tristano, Eric Dolphy, and Getz (1961). He was Elvin Jones’ occasional substitute with John Coltrane’s classic quartet during 1961-1965, toured with Getz (1965-1967), and was with Gary Burton (1967-1968). In addition to touring with Chick Corea (1981 and 1984) and Pat Metheny (1989-1990), Haynes has led his own Hip Ensemble on and off during the past several decades. When one considers that he has also gigged with Miles Davis, Art Pepper, Horace Tapscott, and Dizzy Gillespie, it is fair to say that Haynes has played with about everyone. He led dates for EmArcy and Swing (both in 1954), New Jazz (1958 and 1960), Impulse (a 1962 quartet album with Roland Kirk), Pacific Jazz, Mainstream, Galaxy, Dreyfus, Evidence, and Storyville…….Learn More

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Here’s another exploratory album by John Coltrane (Soprano and Tenor Sax) along with the invaluable Eric Dolphy (Alto Sax and Flute), two bassists (Reggie Workman and Art Davis), Freddie Hubbard (Trumpet) and Elvin Jones (Drums). Overall they produce a rather relax sound that doesn’t let up and keeps the listener interested from begging to end. “Ole Coltrane” was recorded, in studio, May 25, 1961 and will be featured for a couple weeks exclusively for the Jazz Con Class listeners. Check the schedule link for play times, enjoy!

About the album:

Having explored all sorts of country cousins of the blues, John Coltrane evokes the spirit of mother Africa and Moorish Spain on this, his final Atlantic recording. Fellow crusaders McCoy Tyner and Elvin Jones are joined by Reggie Workman as well as fellow bass virtuoso Art Davis, while Trane’s new front-line collaborator Eric Dolphy and trumpeter Freddie Hubbard give him an immense sonic canvas upon which to reinvent jazz. OLE COLTRANE extends the forms, anticipating the freedom and far reaching spiritual pilgrimages of the Impulse! years. Miles’ KIND OF BLUE and the music of Ornette Coleman suggested new improvisational possibilities. For Trane, they represented a way out of his harmonic labyrynth, a pursuit of simpler, more expressive modalities–offering even greater rhythmic/melodic complexity. “Ole” is electrifying, one of Coltrane’s greatest collective achievements. Elvin Jones’ hypnotic six-beat cymbal pulse, the strummed ostinatos of Workman and Davis, and Tyner’s murmuring chordal drone form a syncopated wall of sound–equal parts Iberian dance, desert sirocco and evening raga……..Read More

I have two announcements to make and both will only expand your listening choice here on Jazz Con Class. First of all I am adding and featuring John Coltrane’s “A Love Supreme” to the schedule, check for times here. It will remain in the Jazz Con Class playlist rotation indefinitely, just as I did with the “Blues Bag” album. More on this inspirational album below.

I am also happy to announce a brand new playlist and I named it the 3G Playlist. It contains songs that I have not played yet here, so again, take a look at the schedule link on top of the page for play time. Make yourself familiar with this link because I am always adding and updating it.

More on Album:

A LOVE SUPREME is the essential example of the genius of John Coltrane. In what has become the apotheosis of jazz music, this eminently accessible work bridges the gap between music and spirituality, between art and life. With the ultimate incarnation of the jazz quartet, Coltrane brings together all of his turbulent elements into a cohesive paean to spirituality, one which is fully appreciable by the uninitiated.

A LOVE SUPREME is a 33-minute work divided into four movements. “Acknowledgment” starts the album with a heraldic summoning from Coltrane’s tenor saxophone, full and joyous, which approximates the tone of the prayer he provides in the album’s liner notes. The solo that follows reveals an artist whose spiritual depth and emotional urgency are matched by an adherence to logic and a resolve to achieve one goal above all–communication. Each simple musical statement is either followed by a motivic development or countered with a conversational response. Coltrane climaxes with a distilled four-note motif echoing the album’s title, which he plays with by sequencing it through a wide array of tonalities. Finally, the band comes in, reiterating this idea, chanting the mantra “A Love Supreme.”…..Learn More

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