Currently viewing the tag: "Joe Henderson"

ModeForJoeCover

Wow! This album is actually one of my personal favorites! It has that late 60’s jazz sound I love but with that hard bopish grip that wouldn’t let go so easy and respected so much. All of the musicians in this 1966 album, “Mode for Joe” are hard bop greats (names listed on very top of album cover) and true believers of tradition but were in tune with the changing new variations of jazz. And because of their great improvisational ability, they were able to put their own spin and create music that reflected the social changes going on in America. Well played jazz can have a great impact on the listener in respect to projecting a “real” emotion that can aid or reenforce ones personal opinions. This album does it for me, does it do it for you? Enjoy!

About the album:

Given the recording date of Mode for Joe and the band lineup, it’s easy to assume this is a straight-up hard bop album. However, this 1966 Joe Henderson record — featuring trumpeter Lee Morgan, trombonist Curtis Fuller, vibraphonist Bobby Hutcherson, pianist Cedar Walton, bassist Ron Carter, and drummer Joe Chambers — is a great example of modern jazz at its best. It was recorded during a time of sweeping musical changes due to developments in free jazz, soul-jazz, and even early experiments with fusion. It was a time when the bluesy and funky leanings of hard boppers were giving way to more individualized contemporary approaches. One of the best examples of this shift, Mode for Joe sounds more like……Read More

JoeHendersonInJapanCover

This 1971 Avant-Garde album was totally Japanese, in regard to where it was recorded live and the Japanese musicians that accompany Joe Henderson in making it happen. The only non-Japanese about this album is Joe Henderson himself and the 4 songs performed. Of these three Japanese Jazz musician only the drummer was known in the America (Read below). From all the enjoyable hours of listening to Joe Henderson, I always get the impression of a calm collective and peaceful man. He was a an improviser to the extreme but was very much under control to a point where there was no real wildness. In my opinion, he was the best tenor saxophonist in playing a ballad, there’s no doubt about it. He also was in the forefront of the civil rights Jazz movement in the 60’s. This album, “Joe Henderson in Japan” has a certain feel to it, the Jazz Con Class Radio listeners will actually experience a sort time travel back into time and will find themselves sitting right there watching Joe Henderson and company playing away! The Japanese audience’s knowledge, support and love for Avant-Garde Jazz also creates the most perfect atmosphere. This feature is my token appreciation to all the Japanese listeners that storm this radio station in the wee hours (NYC Time), THANK YOU! Check the schedule link for play times, enjoy!

About the album:

Digitally remastered by Kirk Felton (2000, Fantasy Studios, Berkeley, California). Tenor saxophonist Joe Henderson is heard in peak form throughout this set. Performing at the Junk Club in Tokyo, Henderson is joined by an all-Japanese rhythm section (electric pianist Hideo Ichikawa, bassist Kunimitsu Inaba, and drummer Motohiko Hino) on lengthy versions of “‘Round Midnight,” “Blue Bossa,” and his two originals “Out ‘n’ In” and “Junk Blues.” Henderson sounds quite inspired throughout the set, and the obscure rhythm section (only Hino is known in the U.S.) really pushes him…….Read More

InPursuitOfBlackness

Joe Henderson was quite aware of his so-called “blackness” and really didn’t need to pursue it any further. He used this particular title with reflection of the times the record was recorded (Read below for details). This album is almost impossible to purchase by itself, it is bundled with either “Black is the Color” or “Tetragon, either way you win! I don’t understand why the CD version for this album by itself is not available but these two combinations seem to be the best way to buy it. If you are interested in the Vinyl version, get it used and/or in 8 Track. For more background information of this particular album, go here. The Jazz Con Class Radio listeners will enjoy this excellently improvised album with 2 tracks from a live appearance at the Lighthouse Cafe’ in Hermosa Beach, California on September of 70 with Curtis Fuller on the trombone and the other three songs were recorded in NYC in 1971. Great album to own especially if you are a Joe Henderson fan, that’s why its in my personal library. It will be featured for a week or so, check the schedule link for play times, enjoy!

About the album:

Includes liner notes by Orrin Keepnews, Mitchell Feldman and Joe Henderson. Digitally remastered by Joe Tarantino (1998, Fantasy Studios, Berkeley, California). This two-albums-on-one-CD set captures the tenor master at an interesting juncture, both in his own artistic development and jazz in general. The collection draws from three recording sessions, spanning 1970-72. Henderson’s music honestly reflected what was happening with the different factions shaping jazz in that era: the avant garde, the blossoming of fusion and the influence of the post-bop mainstream. He also synthesizes an awareness of jazz’s African roots and the growing use of electric and electronic instruments and overdubbing (which most of the mainstream jazz audience of the time thought was heresy). The music on this album ranges from straight-ahead standards (“Invitation,” with fine playing from Shaw) and driving, quirky hard bop…..Read More

ListenLiveForPosts

Joe Henderson will be featured on Sunday December 2nd and Sunday December 9th, for a total of 6 hours and at all different times (2 Hour Presentations) so nobody will miss it. This music is from the albums in which he was the leader. He is featured in countless albums as sideman and with all the other greats. All Jazz fans should take a look at his discography here, impressive! Check the Schedule link for the times of these three presentations.

Biography of Joe Henderson:

The tenor saxophonist Joe Henderson was born on April 24, 1937 in a small city called Lima Ohio midway between Dayton and Toledo. He spent his childhood and adolescence in Lima in a family of 15 children where he was exposed to a variety of musical styles. By the time he was a high school student he was already arranging and writing music for the school band and other local outfits. It was in high school that a music teacher introduced him to the tenor saxophone. After graduation he enrolled first at the Kentucky State College to study music and then moved on to Wayne State University in

Detroit. There he had as classmates several future jazz greats such as Yusef Lateef and Donald Byrd. From 1960-1962 he enlisted in the US army where he led several small jazz groups and won first place in a musical competition and was sent on a tour to entertain the troops all over Japan and Europe where he met a few of the expatriate musicians.

Early career: the Blue Note years

After being discharged from the army he traveled to New York and sat in at Birdland with Dexter Gordon and other local musicians. During one of these sessions he was introduced to the trumpeter Kenny Dorham who was so impressed by his musicianship that he arranged for Joe Henderson’s first recording session as a leader with Blue Note Records……..Read More

I ran into this album just the other day while searching for more Nat Adderley, the mostly unmentioned younger brother of the great Cannonball and an excellent Cornetist. Surprisingly he is featured on the trumpet in this album and is joined by an all-star supporting cast. They are Joe Henderson, Herbie Hancock, J.J. Johnson and many more. The name of the album Jazz Con Class will be featuring is Sayin’ Somethin’ and consists of 8 songs.

More on album:

Cornetist Nat Adderley was at the peak of his powers in the mid-1960’s. This Atlantic issue has four quintet numbers with tenor-saxophonist Joe Henderson (three also feature pianist Herbie Hancock) plus four tunes in which Nat is part of an 11-piece group. He plays quite well on such songs as “Cantaloupe Island,” “Hippodelphia,” “Gospellete” and even the then-current pop tune “Call Me,” making this set one to search for. ~ Scott Yanow…..Read More

This an interesting statement from Nat Adderley that I found while searching for more information on this album. It also points out the songs each musician participated in:

I have always believed that, no matter what the reason, the music always speaks for itself. I consciously went into this recording with an idea in mind that I wanted to show that music is music. That there is not such a big gap between blues and avant-garde. That the gap is in the labeling of the music rather than the music itself. All music is to be listened to and enjoyed, if possible, and no one should limit himself to just one type of music. If the musician is not limited, the listener should not be limited either. Open-mindedness is the answer. – Nat Adderley……. Learn More

Look forward to listening to the album feature for a couple of weeks, check the Schedule link for play time. ENJOY!

Joe Henderson is one of my favorite tenor saxophone players and this 1968 release explains why. But really, the music he was a part of in his whole career as a musician was considered to be great. Either as a band leader or as a band member his contribution was always an innovative one. If I were a Jazz fan, I would purchase as much Joe Henderson as I could, you cannot go wrong. The sound he produced was and of course, is still absolutely inspiring. He was always a hip guy and this feeling transfers to the listener, as is, very hip  and very cool. A great musician for the young inspired Jazz students to follow in their learning experience. I will be featuring the “Tetragon” album for a week or so and then release it into the Avant-Garde Playlist. For airing times go the Schedule Link. ENJOY!

About the Album:

Joe Henderson has been a driving force in the jazz community since the early 1960s. Indeed, his skill and conceptual approach to music helped to define contemporary jazz. Certainly, he greatly influenced the “young lions” of the 1980s, who in turn brought renewed integrity to straight-ahead jazz. This 1968 album sees the tenor saxophonist in fine form. His composition “The Bead Game” is decades ahead of its time; jazz simply doesn’t get any more advanced than the soloing heard here by pianist Don Friedman and Henderson himself. Meanwhile, Jack DeJohnette’s driving eighth notes on the ride cymbal also add great urgency and gusto to this tune……Learn More

About Joe Henderson:

The tenor saxophonist Joe Henderson was born on April 24, 1937 in a small city called Lima Ohio midway between Dayton and Toledo. He spent his childhood and adolescence in Lima in a family of 15 children where he was exposed to a variety of musical styles. By the time he was a high school student he was already arranging and writing music for the school band and other local outfits. It was in high school that a music teacher introduced him to the tenor saxophone. After graduation he enrolled first at the Kentucky State College to study music and then moved on to Wayne State University in Detroit. There he had as classmates several future jazz greats such as Yusef Lateef and Donald Byrd. From 1960-1962 he enlisted in the US army where he led several small jazz groups and won first place in a musical competition and was sent on a tour to entertain the troops all over Japan and Europe where he met a few of the expatriate musicians.

Early career: the Blue Note years

After being discharged from the army he traveled to New York and sat in at Birdland with Dexter Gordon and other local musicians. During one of these sessions he was introduced to the trumpeter Kenny Dorham who was so impressed by his musicianship that he arranged for Joe Henderson’s first recording session as a leader with Blue Note Records. This resulted in the record Page One (1963) which to this day remains one of his most critically acclaimed albums. This recording also spawned the standard Blue Bossa. During the following four years he led 4 other sessions for Blue Note and recorded as sideman on over to 2 dozen albums for the same label. Some of these records are today classics of not only the label but also of jazz music. Andrew Hill’s Point of Departure, Larry Young’s Unity, Horace Silver’s Song For My Father and Lee Morgan’s Sidewinder are just a few examples of those

fruitful years. In addition to creating timeless music Joe Henderson’s style also evolved during this period to incorporate all genres of jazz from hard bop to avant garde from latin to soul-jazz…..Learn More

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