Currently viewing the tag: "Jazz Con Class Internet Radio Station"

McLeanAndColtrane

This Super Tuesday Jazz presentation will feature the Saxophone. From right in-tune, to slightly out-of tune to way out-of-tune saxophone masterpieces. These will be predominantly sax lead tunes that will basically drown-out the rest of the instruments in the band. Of course, the existence of the other band members is of great importance. In order for these saxophone geniuses to succeed in achieving their dominance, they need to be showcased by the rest of the band. Jazz musicians are helping/aiding each other constantly, there is never any sign of selfishness present. Jazz musicians respect each other to the maximum and are the best of friends. They feed off each other because of the improvisational nature that helps it evolve further. This leads to a very big question and one that I feel is starring into the faces of all present day Jazz musicians. Has Jazz reached a point where improvising cannot be achieved any further without surpassing the borders it has established throughout its history?? Check the schedule link and Tuesday in particular, for play times, enjoy!

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Who is Cal Massey, well let me tell you how I found out. I was sitting back/relaxing and listening to one of my favorite albums of Lee Morgan, “Lee-Way” and was looking through all the credits to see if Lee Morgan had composed any of the songs. I noticed that he had composed one of the songs, “The Lion and the Wolf” and Jackie McLean had also, “Midtown Blues” but the other two, “These Are Soulful Days” and “Nakatini Suite” had the name “Massey” listed beside them. For curiosity sake, I did a quick search on Cal Massey and learned about a very underrated and rarely mentioned trumpet player who only recorded one album as a leader but more importantly, I found out that he was a great composer of Jazz songs. I will be featuring this standalone masterpiece which was recorded in 1961, “Blues to Coltrane.” Unfortunately for all Jazz fans, this album was not released until 1987! I personally consider this to be a crime and you will probably feel the same when you hear it for yourself. I’m glad that I was able to find out more about Cal Massey and will be more than honored to share this album play with the Jazz Con Class listeners. Check the schedule link for play times, enjoy!

About the album:

Recorded in 1961, but not released until 1987, BLUES TO COLTRANE was the only recording session Massey led. Cal was one of the unsung heroes of jazz, not even rating a mention in “All Music Guide,” but recognized by connoisseurs as a master of beautiful, melodic and soulful trumpet playing. This belated first release of an album recorded almost half a century All songs written by Cal Massey. Recorded at Nola Penthouse Sound Studios, New York on January 13, 1961…..Read More

Biography of Cal Massey:

There’s some doubt about the birth date of composer and trumpeter Cal Massey, with some accounts having him born on January 11, 1928. But there’s no question about his ability as a composer; Massey wrote some poignant and compelling material, and had works recorded by John Coltrane, Freddie Hubbard, Jackie McLean, Lee Morgan, Philly Joe Jones, and Archie Shepp, among others. Some Massey numbers that were cut included “Bakai” by Coltrane, “Fiesta” by Jones, “Assunta, Father and Son” by Hubbard, “Message from Trane” by McLean, and “Cry of My People” by Shepp. Massey studied trumpet with Freddie Webster and worked in big bands led by Jay McShann, Jimmy Heath, and Billie Holiday….Learn More

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TheBlackAngelCover

Here’s a sort of introduction/debut album of Freddie Hubbard in accordance to the new wave type of Jazz started by Miles Davis. Hubbard only displays his contribution on the first track named “Spacetrack” and as you will read below on the album description the rest of the tracks fall back to a more Hard Bopish style. Freddie Hubbard eventually created his own style of Jazz from there on and didn’t really follow the path Miles set. Miles’ style was very sophisticated and did over-improvise in a avant-garde manner but was organized and followed its own unique format, he kept it real and understandable. And although he toyed with it, Miles never did enter that Free Jazz zone. Hubbard improvised plenty in his future recordings, he was certainly avant-garde(ish) but he added the “Soul” factor to his songs. His Jazz focused more on the urban youth movement adding that electronic funky beat and in the process did not exclude the Latin presence/influence which was also very strong in the late 60’s. For me in particular, I like Hubbard’s style more than Miles. The Jazz Con Class listeners here should understand that I personally identify with it more because I grew up in the New York City metropolitan area. Also and very important to me, Hubbard didn’t abandon the Hard Bop style, he was more “old school” you could say. He eventually stayed away from the Jazzfusion movement that started afterwards, in the early to mid 70’s. Hubbard continued on with his style and came out with four popular recording after this album, they were Red Clay, First Light, Straight Life, and Sky Dive. The Black Angel” will be featured for a week or so, check the schedule link for play times, enjoy!

About the Album:

Digitally remastered by Gene Paul (DB Plus, New York, New York). Freddie Hubbard released The Black Angel in the same year as the landmark Miles Davis album Bitches Brew. Its obvious Hubbard wanted to appeal to the emerging crossover rock/jazz crowd of the era. The presence of bop, however, still permeated Hubbard’s playing, unlike Miles who had long since dropped the form. The opening Hubbard composition “Spacetrack” contains fiery avant garde interplay between Hubbard, James Spaulding on alto and Kenny Barron’s electric piano. Thanks to Spaulding and bassist Reggie Workman, much of the playing here maintains intensity. The other Hubbard penned originals, “Gittin Down” is an urgent hard swinging boogaloo and the ballad “Eclipse” features Spaulding on flute and Barron on piano. “Coral Keys” written by Walter Bishop, Jr. and Barron’s “Black Angel have a Latin tinge highlighted by Spaulding’s soaring flute…..Read More

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TuesdayLoveJazzPresentation

This Jazz presentation will concentrate on “Love” and songs that have word “Love” in its title. And of course, relate to love and the meaning it truly has. All the ups and downs, all the real love and the pretended love. All the joys of being in Love and all the heartbreaks of feeling it will never work. From “What is this thing called love” to “The Look of love” to “Star-Crossed lovers” to “Perpetual Love” to “Almost like being in love” to “Falling in love with love” to “What now my Love?” to “The End of a love affair” to “What Love?”  All sorts of situations concerning love that we have all experienced or are experiencing at the present moment. Songs that can help us all understand love and its importance. Songs that can help us cope with a Love affair and songs that can prepare us in case we never been in love. Songs that can be very therapeutic for many listeners and songs that will be a reality check for others. Everyone feels love differently and adopts to it in their own way but it must be mutual for both to work. Yes, Love can be complicated but who said it was ever going to be easy? Check the schedule link for play times, ENJOY!

MilesSmilesCover

Yes its all smiles when listening to this album, “Miles Smiles.” So is that familiar constant cymbal beat of Tony Williams on the drums, as he works that forward march, along with Wayne Shorter,  Herbie Hancock and Ron Carter. A true advance Avant-Garde sound of  integrated instrumentation, acoustically brilliant! This album will be featured for a week or so, check the schedule link for play times.

About the album:

With their second album, Miles Smiles, the second Miles Davis Quintet really began to hit their stride, delving deeper into the more adventurous, exploratory side of their signature sound. This is clear as soon as “Orbits” comes crashing out the gate, but it’s not just the fast, manic material that has an edge — slower, quieter numbers are mercurial, not just in how they shift melodies and chords, but how the voicing and phrasing never settles into a comfortable groove. This is music that demands attention, never taking predictable paths or easy choices. Its greatest triumph is that it masks this adventurousness within music that is warm and accessible — it just never acts that way……Read More

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RedGarlanSuperTuesdayImage

Last week the Super Tuesday Jazz Presentation concentrated on Jazz tunes that started with the word “Blue” and this week’s presentation will be concentrate with songs that start with the word “Blues.” It’s amazing how many Jazz songs have the word “Blue” and “Blues but it shouldn’t be surprising because Jazz derives from the Blues. It is structured in format differently but contains the Blues. Like I did last week, I only placed the songs that start with the word “Blues” not including those that don’t necessarily contain the word “Blues” in it. The Jazz Con Class listeners will enjoy this presentation also, every song is handpicked and are great. But this is not so difficult for Jazz fans to judge, every traditional/classic Jazz tune is extraordinary, my goal is to place them in an order where it will flow best. Check the Schedule Link for play times. ENJOY!

Note: Please excuse the introduction, this Jazz Presentation will be 3 Hours and Half.

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DearOldStockholmCover

Here’s another great album from Coltrane where he teams up with McCoy Tyner and create a great foundation. The lively relentless drum work of Roy Haynes moves it to right direction and Garrison on Bass fills in all the gaps. This album is very similar in character as the “Crescent” album as they are only a year apart but much, more improvising by Coltrane. “Dear Old Stockholm” will be featured for a week or so, check the schedule link for play times, ENJOY!

Note: To complete the hour I added the song “Crescent” from the “Crescent” Album after the album feature completes.

About the album:

DEAR OLD STOCKHOLM gathers together studio sessions the Coltrane Quartet made with the great drummer Roy Haynes who was filling in for the remarkable Elvin Jones. “I always tried to get him when Elvin Jones wasn’t able to make it,” Coltrane explained. The resulting studio sessions, now gathered together on one disc for the first time, paint an intriguing sonic alternative to the great Coltrane Quartet of the ’60s. Where Elvin Jones’ is all rolling thunder and elemental energy, Haynes’ polyrhythmic style is more stacatto and jagged. What both drummers had in common was an uncanny intuition for orchestrating Coltrane’s epic melodic inventions, and setting up a freewheeling rhythmic counterpoint to his most complex…..Read More

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More on Roy Haynes:

A veteran drummer long overshadowed by others, but finally in the 1990s gaining recognition for his talents and versatility, Roy Haynes has been a major player for half a century. He worked early on with the Sabby Lewis big band, Frankie Newton, Luis Russell (1945-1947), and Lester Young (1947-1949). After some engagements with Kai Winding, Haynes was a member of the Charlie Parker Quintet (1949-1952); he also recorded during this era with Bud Powell, Wardell Gray, and Stan Getz. Haynes toured the world with Sarah Vaughan (1953-1958); played with Thelonious Monk in 1958; led his own group; and gigged with George Shearing, Lennie Tristano, Eric Dolphy, and Getz (1961). He was Elvin Jones’ occasional substitute with John Coltrane’s classic quartet during 1961-1965, toured with Getz (1965-1967), and was with Gary Burton (1967-1968). In addition to touring with Chick Corea (1981 and 1984) and Pat Metheny (1989-1990), Haynes has led his own Hip Ensemble on and off during the past several decades. When one considers that he has also gigged with Miles Davis, Art Pepper, Horace Tapscott, and Dizzy Gillespie, it is fair to say that Haynes has played with about everyone. He led dates for EmArcy and Swing (both in 1954), New Jazz (1958 and 1960), Impulse (a 1962 quartet album with Roland Kirk), Pacific Jazz, Mainstream, Galaxy, Dreyfus, Evidence, and Storyville…….Learn More

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JustWailinCover

Another great album comprised of superstars but what makes it even more interesting, is the combination of Herbie Mann and Charlie Rouse. They compliment each other very well, taking turns and advancing the song forward in a sweet fashion. This album, “Just Wailin’” was released in 1958 and sounds like something from the mid 60’s. Everyone does get a piece of the action but what glues it all together is when Mann and Rouse join in, outstanding! The listeners here at Jazz Con Class will have a blast with this album feature, check the schedule link for play times.

About the album:

This CD reissue of an earlier Prestige LP emphasizes (but does not stick exclusively to) the blues. The sextet has impressive players in flutist Herbie Mann, Charlie Rouse on tenor, guitarist Kenny Burrell, pianist Mal Waldron, bassist George Joyner and drummer Art Taylor. The material (originals by Waldron, Burrell and Calvin Massey, in addition to a brief “Jumpin’ With Symphony Sid”) is reasonably challenging…The straight-ahead jam session has its strong moments, and as long as one doesn’t let their expectations get out of hand, the music…..Read More

HerbieMannBioImage

More on Herbie Mann (Biography):

Herbie Mann played a wide variety of music throughout his career. He became quite popular in the 1960s, but in the ’70s became so immersed in pop and various types of world music that he seemed lost to jazz. However, Mann never lost his ability to improvise creatively as his later recordings attest. Herbie Mann began on clarinet when he was nine but was soon also playing flute and tenor. After serving in the Army, he was with Mat Mathews’ Quintet (1953-1954) and then started working and recording as a leader. During 1954-1958 Mann stuck mostly to playing bop, sometimes collaborating with such players as Phil Woods, Buddy Collette, Sam Most, Bobby Jaspar, and Charlie Rouse. He doubled on cool-toned tenor and was one of the few jazz musicians in the ’50s who recorded on bass clarinet; he also recorded a full album in 1957 (for Savoy) of unaccompanied flute. After spending time playing and writing music for television, Mann formed his Afro-Jazz Sextet, in 1959, a group using several percussionists, vibes (either Johnny Rae, Hagood Hardy, or Dave Pike) and the leader’s flute. He toured Africa (1960) and Brazil (1961), had a hit with “Comin’ Home Baby,” and recorded with Bill Evans. The most popular jazz flutist during the era, Mann explored bossa nova (even recording in Brazil in 1962), incorporated music from many cultures (plus current pop tunes) into his repertoire, and had among his sidemen such top young musicians as Willie Bobo, Chick Corea (1965), Attila Zoller, and Roy Ayers; at the 1972 Newport Festival his sextet included David Newman and Sonny Sharrock. By then Mann had been a producer at Embroyo (a subsidiary of Atlantic) for three years and was frequently stretching his music outside of jazz. As the ’70s advanced, Mann became much more involved in rock, pop, reggae, and even disco. After leaving Atlantic at the end of the ’70s, Mann had his own label for awhile and gradually came back to jazz……Learn More

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BlueSuperTuesdayPresentation

This Super Tuesday Jazz Presentation will totally concentrate on only song titles that start with the word “Blue.” As one can imagine how many Jazz songs that have the word Blue in the title but there are many more with the word Blues in the title, those are not included on this particular presentation. That goes for the Jazz song titles that have the word Blue in it but do not start with it, they are not included in this presentation either. I left many great songs out because they were not as consistent with the others but these will do. Check the schedule link for play times, enjoy!

Thelonious Monk “Blue Monk”:

JazzAdvanceCover

One cannot measure the advancement and mindset of the great Cecil Taylor in 1956 when he recorded this album “Jazz Advance (Deluxe Edition).” There are very few others who could be compared to pianist Cecil Taylor in Jazz history. He simply took it a step further and with no thought of hesitation or fear. This man plays the piano like nobody ever has and like anybody who as talented, will ever attempt to play it. And because of his overabundance of superiority, he has been jealously ignored. Jazz is very advance and sometimes when watching an old footage of video, one can be thrown off by appearance. You see men or woman playing instruments but not in a very animated way. So you lose track of the music and how exceptional it truly is. Listening only and with no visual distractions, would be the best way to digest it. Listening closely to Cecil Taylor play the piano in this album will help you understand Jazz further. He might go out into tangents here and there, so let him go, be patient, he’ll come back to the song and when he does, it will feel like he never departed the song at all! But why? You ask yourself. Because its Jazz you’re listening to and now you finally understand it. There’s no such thing as an explanation of what Jazz sounds like. You either accept to understand its sophistication or you refuse it. You must give it a real chance though and you will find out how beneficial it is to your mind. Check the schedule link for play times and remember, this is the Deluxe Edition, it has three extra songs and they are live, ENJOY!

AdvanceJazzDeluxeEdition

About the album (Note: This is the Deluxe Edition):

The Transition label and the then new music of Cecil Taylor were perfectly matched, the rebellion in modern jazz was on in 1956, and the pianist was at the forefront. Though many did not understand his approach at the time, the passing years temper scathing criticism, and you can easily appreciate what he is accomplishing. For the reissue Jazz Advance, you hear studio sessions in Boston circa 1956, and the legendary, ear-turning set of 1957 at the Newport Jazz Festival. A young Steve Lacy is included on several tracks, and while revealing Taylor‘s roughly hewn façade, the few pieces as a soloist and with his trio of bassist Buell Neidlinger and drummer Dennis Charles are even more telling. At his most astonishing, Taylor slightly teases, barely referring to the melody of “You’d Be So Nice to Come Home To,” wrapping his playful, wild fingers and chordal head around a completely reworked, fractured, and indistinguishable yet introspective version of this well-worn song form. Taylor is also able to circle the wagons, jabbing and dotting certain vital notes on the melody of “Sweet & Lovely.” When inclined to turn off putting dissonant chords into playful melody changes, he does so, turning around Thelonious Monk‘s “Bemsha Swing” delightfully, and then scattering notes everywhere in his solo. Lacy‘s soprano sax is more than up to….Read More

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Here’s a great Avant-Garde album from Cedar Walton and his first as a leader. It was recorded in 1967 and launched a new career for him as he entered the Jazz Funk scene. He is considered one of the top pianists that Jazz has offered and is well known but had to earn it. As you can see in his discography he was an integral part of many major Jazz breakthrough albums. The name of this album is “Cedar!” and don’t get confused with MP3 version shown there on Amazon, this album is only available on CD there. Its very relaxing Jazz with heavy impressive/innovative piano from Cedar and great drum work by my favorite Billy Higgins who layers it with c o o l n e s s. Kenny Dorham is sweet and subtle on the Trumpet, Junior Cook adds texture on Tenor and Leroy Vinnegar is domineering with a powerful Bass. The contributions of sidemen Dorham and Cook are not in all the songs (Read Below). Check the schedule link for play times. Great stuff, enjoy!

About the album:

Digitally remastered by Phil De Lancie (1990, Fantasy Studios, Berkeley). His first recording as a leader finds Cedar Walton an optimistic and self-assured pianist/composer in the post-bop style. This 1967, cleanly-produced recording contains seven swinging numbers featuring Cedar in trio, quartet and quintet configurations. The album opens with “Turquoise Twice,” a hard-driving, modally-inclined tune. Cedar’s solo is crisp, logical and rigorous, his left hand dipping into some McCoy Tyner-like fifths. His no-nonsense approach, and rootsy pianistic touch carries the album. This is intelligent but not intellectual jazz. One of the strongest tracks is the charming but edgy “Twilight Waltz.” Billy Higgins’ drums out some swinging counter-rhythms underneath Cedar’s bluesy ornamentation. And trumpeter Kenny Dorham performs a clearly melodic solo, straight and singing. “My Ship” (Gershwin-Weill) is intimate as a trio. Cedar’s balance between horn-like single notes……Read More

CedarWaltonBioImage

Biography of Cedar Walton:

One of the most valued of all hard bop accompanists, Cedar Walton is a versatile pianist whose funky touch and cogent melodic sense have graced the recordings of many of jazz’s greatest players. He is also one of the music’s more underrated composers; although he has always been a first-rate interpreter of standards, Walton wrote a number of excellent tunes (“Mosaic,” “Ugetsu,” and “Bolivia,” to name a few) that found their way into Art Blakey’s book during the pianist’s early-’60s stint with the Jazz Messengers. In addition to his many quantifiable accomplishments, Walton is less well known as the first pianist to record, in April 1959 with John Coltrane, the tenorist’s daunting “Giant Steps” — unlike the unfortunate Tommy Flanagan a month later, Walton wasn’t required to solo, though he does comp magnificently. Walton was first taught piano by his mother. After attending the University of Denver, he moved to New York in 1955, ostensibly to play music. Instead, he was drafted into the Army……Read More

HawkFliesHighCover

On Jazz Con Class there’s plenty of Coleman Hawkins to be heard but there hasn’t been an album of his featured. “The Hawk Flies High” will be featured for a few weeks or so. I will actually place it on the Hard Bop playlist because that’s the style of Jazz used. Coleman Hawkins is considered to be the best tenor Saxophonist ever because he simply reinvented it and incorporated into Jazz, nobody before him had done this. Even Lestor Young, who many feel was the first to do this, mentioned in an a Jazz Review interview “As far as I’m concerned, I think Coleman Hawkins was the President first, right? As far as myself, I think I’m the second one.” They both had there own styles but Coleman Hawkins was the first. Every tenor saxophonist has a little Hawkins in them. This album is very interesting and very different, it doesn’t only features Coleman Hawkins as the driving force. Check the schedule link for play times.

About the album:

Although Coleman Hawkins was 51 when THE HAWK FLIES HIGH was recorded in 1957, he hadn’t lost any of the vigor or imaginative dexterity that had typified his original work in the `30s and `40s. In fact, one of Hawkins’s greatest assets was his ability to adapt to and incorporate changing styles, and that’s precisely what he does here by bringing his swing-inflected chops into a straight bop context. Surrounded by then-young firebrands J.J. Johnson and Idrees Sulieman (on trombone and trumpet, respectively), Hawkins turns in memorable performances on album highlights such as “Juicy Fruit,” “Laura,” and “Sanctity.” The disc was remastered and reissued in 2008…..Read More

BlueSpringCover

What a sweet album this is, the Jazz Con Class listeners are going to enjoy this uplifting collection of spring songs. All six songs have the word “Spring” in it. Kenny Dorham with his low pitch signature sound and Cannonball Adderley with his soulful glorious sound make a great combination. There’s an addition of instruments (Baritone Sax, French Horn) in this album which was a combination of two separate 1959 recordings. All the musicians were in both recordings except for the drummers, Jimmy Cobb (Tracks 1-4) and Philly Joe Jones (Tracks 5 and 6). “Blue Spring” will be featured for a week or so, check the schedule link for play times.

About the album:

Digitally remastered by David Luke (1990, Fantasy Studios, Berkeley, California). In lieu of picking up one of the trumpeter’s fine Blue Note releases (Una Mas, Whistle Stop), listeners new to the work of Kenny Dorham should definitely consider this somewhat overlooked Riverside date from 1959. The set features plenty of Dorham’s varied and sophisticated horn work and four of his top-drawer originals. The theme is spring, and Dorham responds with his soon to be jazz standard “Spring Is Here” and three other fine seasonal tributes: the title track, “Poetic Spring,” and “Spring Cannon.” This last cut is also a tribute to Julian “Cannonball” Adderley, who guests in fine style here with a bevy of fleet and highly melodic solos. Rounding out the group, baritone saxophonist Cecil Payne, French horn player David Amram, and pianist Cedar Walton add very nicely to the album’s breezy yet provocative air……Read More

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Here’s a great live album of Thelonious Monk and his one-performance orchestra. The videos below will fill the Jazz Con Class listeners with more detail. The official name of the album is “Thelonious Monk and his Orchestra at Town Hall.” Orrin Keepnews was the founder of Riverside Records and since then has sold the rights to the Concord Music Group. Here’s a link to all the Keepnews albums that are available for purchase. Thelonious Monk’s orchestra consists of: Thelonious Monk (piano); Phil Woods (alto saxophone); Charlie Rouse (tenor saxophone); Pepper Adams (baritone saxophone); Donald Byrd (trumpet); Robert Nothern (French horn); Eddie Bert (trombone); Jay McAllister (tuba); Sam Jones (bass); Art Taylor (drums). Personnel: Thelonious Monk (piano); Phil Woods (alto saxophone); Charlie Rouse (tenor saxophone); Pepper Adams (baritone saxophone); Donald Byrd (trumpet); Robert “Brother Ah” Northern (French horn); Eddie Bert (trombone); Jay McAllister (tuba); Sam Jones (bass guitar); Art Taylor (drums). Its so unusual and even awkward to see these Jazz greats sitting down and playing their instruments. Check the schedule link for play times, enjoy!

About the album:

Recorded live at Town Hall, New York, New York on February 28, 1959. Originally released on Riverside (1138). Includes liner notes by Orrin Keepnews. Digitally remastered by Joe Tarantino (1989, Fantasy Studios, Berkeley, California). Numerous Thelonious Monk live dates were released during his career (and posthumously), but 1959’s THE THELONIOUS MONK ORCHESTRA AT TOWN HALL is one of the finest. In large part the album stands out for the novelty of hearing Monk play with a large ensemble. The tentet featured here has the guts and punch of a big band, but the agility of a small group (a necessary quality when rendering Monk’s complex, angular tunes). The program features some of the legend’s finest compositions…….Read More

Video about the Town Hall concert (Part One):

And Part Two:

 

BlueAndSentimentalCover

This 1961 album was a beautifully mellow and completely embraces its title. “Blue and Sentimental” should appropriately be heard in a relaxed environment or maybe when one is looking for a way to rest their mind after a long, crazy day. That’s the beauty of Jazz and I always said to those who asked me why I listen to this musical art form. I always answer with, “Jazz keeps me sane.” Ike Quebec played the saxophone in a straight forward gentle manner that does not, by any means, bother the ears. This album helps equip the Jazz Con Class listeners with even more of an advantage because of the addition of Grant Green, who is considered to many as the very best Jazz guitarist ever. There are a few upbeat songs in the album but Quebec and Grant keep it under control. After you listen to the whole album, you will confirm it to yourselves, it is truly, Blue and Sentimental! This album will be featured for a week or so, check the schedule link for play times, enjoy.

More on the Album:

Although not as well known as other big tenor men like John Coltrane, Hank Mobley, or Benny Golson, Ike Quebec was a major contributor to the classic era of jazz and this 1961 Blue Note date captures him in his prime. BLUE & SENTIMENTAL is indeed one of but a few discs that Quebec recorded for Blue Note, although he was involved with the legendary label as an A&R man and performed on many sessions by other artists. His huge, velvety tone and bluesy swagger are Quebec’s signature as he lopes and swings through several classic tunes like Count Basie’s lazy title track, the bouncing “That Old Black Magic,” and Cole Porter’s hauntingly melodic “It’s Alright With Me.” Filling out the quartet are no less than Grant Green, Paul Chambers, and Philly Joe Jones, Blue Note regulars all, who shine brightly as always……Read More

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Biography of Ike Quebec:

“This incontestably superior musician has been almost totally ignored in the chronicling of the musical form to which he has contributed so much. Quebec was a tenor man of the Hawkins school with a big tone and firm, vigorous style. I hope this new perspective of the contribution Ike Quebec has made to jazz will help to bring a little lightness to his soul and much more recognition to his name.” Leonard Feather

An accomplished dancer and pianist, he switched to tenor sax as his primary instrument in his early 20s, and quickly earned a reputation as a promising player. His recording career started in 1940, with the Barons of Rhythm. He recorded or performed with Frankie Newton, Hot Lips Page, Roy Eldridge, Trummy Young, Ella Fitzgerald, Benny Carter and Coleman Hawkins. Between 1944 and 1951, he worked with Cab Calloway. He recorded for Blue Note records in this era, and also served as a talent scout for the label (helping pianists Thelonious Monk and Bud Powell come to wider attention) and, due to his exceptional sight reading skills, was an uncredited impromptu arranger for many Blue Note sessions……Read More

AllLiveTuesdayJazzPresentation

This week will feature an “All Live” recordings of great Traditional/Classic Jazz.  While preparing this playlist I have come to the realization that I have enough live Jazz recordings to feature it on the rotation by making a specialized playlist for it. I will have this playlist available on a regular basis for the Jazz Con Class listeners very soon. But for this Super Tuesday, I will have a three-hour Jazz Presentation that will air three times in a 24 hour time span, so nobody will miss it around the world. Take a look at the schedule link for play times and enjoy!

Here’s an excellent movie of a 1963 concert from Sanremo, Italy:

Impact(Enja)Cover

This a great “Live” album and the listeners of Jazz Con Class will enjoy it very much. I ran into it while searching for more albums of Charles Tolliver. The name of this album is “Impact” but please do not confuse it with an earlier recorded album with the same exact name. This is the Enja version and was recorded live in Germany in 1972. I searched for reviews online and could not find anything close to a more accurate description/review of this album, than the one below. Excellent album, check the schedule link for play times.

About the album (Most Accurate review from Stuart Jefferson, on Amazon.com):

One disc 73 minutes approximately. Digitally remastered. The sound is very clean and has a warmth,which is sometimes lacking in live recordings and/or through the remastering process. This disc features Charles Tolliver -flugelhorn,Stanley Cowell-piano,Ron Mathewson-bass,and Alvin Queen-drums.

Anyone with more than a passing interest in jazz will know all the above players. All of them have played with both many known and unknown musicians/groups for many years. This particular recording is taken from a live concert in Germany, in 1972. Don’t let the date fool you into thinking that this is “old”jazz-not worth hearing. This recording could sit alongside some of the more forward thinking releases on Blue Note Records,or any other labels you might happen to think of. Right now I have to say that I feel it’s a shame that music of this caliber is only truly appreciated,by and large,in Europe. For this is some excellent post be-bop played at it’s finest.

Both the bassist and drummer hold things together and give these tunes a real grounding,while at the same time they never lose that feeling of swing so important to this type of music. Tolliver’s playing is always right on the mark. Never cluttering up his sound with to many notes,he leaves just enough space between the notes so that the music breathes and seems to come alive. Likewise Cowell-his playing,no matter if he’s filling in spaces or is soloing,is always of the highest caliber.

After a short introduction of the players,the first track gets off to a rousing start and doesn’t really let up. The same could be said for the second track. On the third track the entire group slows way down for some beautiful ensemble playing,which gives way to some fine solo work by Cowell and Tolliver. On this track,like others,Mathewson’s bass playing is very sensitive and fits in the pocket very well indeed. The drummer knows when to hold back and just keep things moving along without calling attention to himself. The fourth track has some intense playing alongside some quieter passages. This track really feels like this group has been playing together(whether true or not) for a long while. The weaving of instruments,the ebb and flow of sound,all give this track a real identity. This edition of this album contains two previously unreleased tracks,for an extra twenty-five minutes of music. Track five starts out with a bit of a “soul-jazz” feel to it. It’s different than the previous tracks,but gives a broader view of these fine musicians,and is still in the post be-bop mode. Tolliver is in fine form here,as is Cowell. Both play over and around each other,and is a nice change of pace. The last track starts out with all four players,and then gives way to Tolliver’s horn. There is a drum solo shortly into this track,and not being a fan of such,I will let the individual listener make up his own mind……Read More

ShadesOfReddCover

This is an exceptional Hard Bop album, released in 1960 from another less known Jazz pianist Freddie Redd. This quintet he put together was extraordinary, especially on the saxophones. A dynamic duel of two greats, Jackie McLean (Alto) and Tina Brooks (Tenor). And of course, the rest of the cast is amazing, Paul Chambers (Bass) and Louis Hayes (Drums). “Shades of Redd” will be featured for a week or so and then placed in the Hard Bop playlist. Check the schedule link for play times, enjoy!

About the album:

Digitally remastered using 20-bit technology by Ron McMaster. This is part of Blue Note’s Limited Edition Connoisseur series. SHADES OF REDD is part of the seemingly endless stream of bop and post-bop albums released on Blue Note in the 1960s, and as such is easy to overlook. That, however, would be a mistake, as SHADES OF REDD is a gleaming gem of a find. With saxophonists Jackie McLean and Tina Brooks in the front line, pianist Freddie Redd leads a rhythm section through nine blues-inflected bop numbers of his own composition. Cool, elegant, and with plenty of swing factor, SHADES OF REDD might sound, theoretically, like any other disc from the period, but this is one of the sets where the elements came together perfectly. Jazz fans of nearly any stripe would do well to pick this up…….Read More

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Biography of Freddie Redd:

A classic bop pianist and a composer of haunting melodies, Freddie Redd has had an episodic career, with high points followed by periods in which he maintained a low profile. After a period in the Army (1946-1949), Redd worked with drummer Johnny Mills and then in New York played with Tiny Grimes (with whom he recorded), Cootie Williams, Oscar Pettiford, and the Jive Bombers. Redd, who appeared with both jazz and early R&B groups, recorded his debut as a leader for Prestige in 1955 (reissued in the OJC series), appeared on dates led by Gene Ammons and Art Farmer, and toured Sweden in 1956 with Ernestine Anderson and Rolf Ericson, cutting an obscure trio set in Sweden for the Metronome label. When he returned to the U.S., Redd settled for a time in San Francisco, where he worked as the house pianist at Bop City and recorded for Riverside. He found his greatest fame when he wrote the music for the play The Connection. He acted and played in the landmark show in New York, London, and Paris, was in the film, and recorded the music for Blue Note……Learn More

That'sRightCover

This 1960 album is considered to be one of the first Hard Bop album and it will not let the listeners of Jazz Con Class down. The Adderley clan consisting of Nat, Cannonball and Yusef Lateef (Both Tenor and Flute) are joined by two more sax giants, Charlie Rouse and Jimmy Heath. Tate Houston also was on board with his saxophone. That’s Right! The album labels it the “Big Sax Section.” One can actually distinguish between them as they take turns with short leads. Great album to sit back and enjoy, very entertaining and with a soft grace to it. Nat Adderley establishes himself as a real leader here with that swift pronounced cornet sound. Check the Schedule link for play times.

About Album:

That’s Right!: Nat Adderley & The Big Sax Section album by Nat Adderley was released Jan 30, 2007 on the Original Jazz Classics label. Nat Adderley has seldom played with more fire, verve, and distinction as he does on That’s Right! It places him in the company of an expanded sax section that includes his brother Cannonball on alto, Yusef Lateef on tenor, flute, and oboe, Jimmy Heath and Charlie Rouse on tenor, and baritone saxophonist Tate Houston. That’s Right!: Nat Adderley & The Big Sax Section songs Solos crackle, the backing is tasty and stimulating, and the eight songs range from brisk standards…Read More

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Biography of Yusef Lateef:

Yusef Lateef is a Grammy Award-winning composer, performer, recording artist, author, visual artist, educator and philosopher who has been a major force on the international musical scene for more than six decades. In recognition of his many contributions to the world of music, he has been named an American Jazz Master for the year 2010 by the National Endowment for the Arts.
Still very much active as a touring and recording artist, Yusef Lateef is universally acknowledged as one of the great living masters and innovators in the African American tradition of autophysiopsychic music — that which comes from one’s spiritual, physical and emotional self.
As a virtuoso on a broad spectrum of reed instruments — tenor saxophone, flute, oboe, bamboo flute, shanai, shofar, argol, sarewa, and taiwan koto — Yusef Lateef has introduced delightful new sounds and blends of tone colors to audiences all over the world, and he has incorporated the sounds of many countries into his own music. As a result, he is considered a pioneer in what is known today as “world music.”
As a composer, Yusef Lateef has compiled a catalogue of works not only for the quartets and quintets he has led, but for symphony and chamber orchestras, stage bands, small ensembles, vocalists, choruses and solo pianists. His extended works have been performed by the WDR (Cologne), NDR (Hamburg), Atlanta, Augusta and Detroit Symphony Orchestras, the Symphony of the New World, Eternal Wind, the GO Organic Orchestra, and the New Century Players from California Insitute of the Arts. In 1987 he won a Grammy Award for his recording of “Yusef Lateef’s Little Symphony,” on which he performed all the parts. His latest extended works include a woodwind quintet, his Symphony No.2, and a concerto for piano and orchestra.
As an educator, Yusef has devoted much of his life to exploring the methodology of autophysiopsychic music in various cultures and passing what he has learned on to new generations of students. He is an emeritus Five Colleges professor at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst, MA, from which he was awarded a Ph.D. in Education in 1975. His doctoral dissertation was entitled “An Overview of Western and Islamic Education.” In 2007 he was named University of Massachusetts’ “Artist of the Year.”
As an author, Yusef Lateef has published two novellas, “A Night in the Garden of Love” and “Another Avenue;” two collections of short stories, “Spheres” and “Rain Shapes;” and his autobiography, “The Gentle Giant,” written in collaboration with Herb Boyd. In recent years he has also exhibited his paintings at various art galleries.
Yusef A. Lateef was born William Emanuel Huddleston on October 9, 1920 in Chattanooga, Tennessee, and moved with his family to Detroit in 1925. In Detroit’s fertile musical environment, Yusef soon established long-standing friendships with such masters of American music as Milt Jackson, Tommy Flanagan, Barry Harris, Paul Chambers, Donald Byrd, the Jones brothers (Hank, Thad and Elvin), Curtis Fuller, Kenny Burrell, Lucky Thompson and Matthew Rucker. He was already proficient on tenor saxophone while in high school, and at the age of 18…..Learn More

 

HardBopSunday

Starting this Sunday April 7th, I will begin featuring a straight six hours of Hard Bop Jazz and will appropriately call it “Hard Bop Sunday.” I will change the beginning time every Sunday so it could be listened to on prime-time from any part of the planet. There are an average of 90 countries that tune in to Jazz Con Class on a monthly basis and all because it is on 24 hours/7 days a week. Check the schedule link for play times. Enjoy!

Here are several great interpretations/explanations of Hard Bop (Wikipedia):

Hard bop is a style of jazz that is an extension of bebop (or “bop”) music. Journalists and record companies began using the term in the mid-1950s to describe a new current within jazz which incorporated influences from rhythm and blues, gospel music, and blues, especially in saxophone and piano playing.

David H. Rosenthal contends in his book Hard Bop that the genre is, to a large degree, the natural creation of a generation of African-American musicians who grew up at a time when bop and rhythm and blues were the dominant forms of black American music. Prominent hard bop musicians included Horace Silver, Art Blakey, Cannonball Adderley, Miles Davis and Tadd Dameron.

Hard bop is sometimes referred to as “funky hard bop.” The “funky” label refers to the rollicking, rhythmic feeling associated with the style.[3] The descriptor is also used to describe soul jazz, which is commonly associated with hard bop.[1][3] According to Mark C. Gridley, soul jazz more specifically refers to music with “an earthy, bluesy melodic concept and… repetitive, dance-like rhythms…. Note that some listeners make no distinction between ‘soul-jazz’ and ‘funky hard bop,’ and many musicians don’t consider ‘soul-jazz’ to be continuous with ‘hard bop.’ The term “soul” suggests the church, and traditional gospel music elements such as “amen chords” (the plagal cadence) and triadic harmonies seemed to suddenly appear in jazz during the era.

History

According to Nat Hentoff in his 1957 liner notes for the Art Blakey Columbia LP entitled Hard Bop, the phrase “hard bop” was originated by author-critic-pianist John Mehegan, jazz reviewer of the New York Herald Tribune at that time. Hard bop first developed in the mid-1950s, and is generally seen as originating with The Jazz Messengers, a quartet led by pianist Horace Silver and drummer Art Blakey. Some saw hard bop as a response to cool jazz and west coast jazz. As Paul Tanner, Maurice Gerow, and David Megill explain, “the hard bop school… saw the new instrumentation and compositional devices used by cool musicians as gimmicks rather than valid developments of the jazz tradition.” However, Shelly Manne suggested that cool jazz and hard bop simply reflected their respective geographic environments: the relaxed cool jazz style reflected a more relaxed….Read More

GrooveBluesCover

Gene Ammons sure had a nice group of “All Stars” with him when he recorded this 1958 album. The album is appropriately named “Groove Blues” because it is exactly how you will feel like when listening to it. As for the all stars, you will get John Coltrane, Art Pepper, Jerome Richardson (Flute) and Mal Waldron playing together. Rounding off this Mini-Big Band, you also have Art Taylor (drums), George Joyner (bass) and Paul Quinichette (Tenor Sax). Great album, not overabundant with improvisation but very entertaining and not one bit boring. It will be featured for a week or so, check the schedule link for play times. ENJOY!

About the album:

On January 3, 1958, Gene Ammons had a good day-a very good day. Recording sessions from that date resulted in two albums with his All Stars, GROOVE BLUES and the equally impressive THE BIG SOUND. On GROOVE BLUES, the All Stars stretch out on four tunes: Ammons’ own “Jug Handle,” two numbers by pianist Mal Waldron, and one song by Rogers & Hammerstein. The All Stars boast four saxophonists and represent the cream of the post-bop crop. John Coltrane’s alto, Pepper Adams’ baritone, and Paul Quinichette’s tenor trade off with Ammons’ tenor with fire and grace. Their massed sound, along with Jerome Richardson’s flute, is a dazzling force as it flies over the piano and rhythm section gently pushing “Groove Blues.” The closing ballad, “It Might as Well be Spring,” is built around the lush tones of Ammons’ solitary horn and the piano-anchored trio, its 11 minutes of passionate romanticism drifting by like a hypnotic reverie. Recorded at the Van Gelder Studio, Hackensack, New Jersey on January 3, 1958……Read More

AstronautTuesdayJazzSpecial

Last week I featured straight forward Hard Bop and the Jazz Con Class listeners loved it but this week I will feature long, deep improvised songs that take it to an extraterrestrial level. It will start in with in a formidable improvised Avant-Garde fashion and then will leap into the atmosphere and take you on an inter-stellar journey.  Three and a half hours of mind-bending strength that will open your thoughts to knowledge. It is incredible how instrumentally superior Jazz musicians actually are and this Super Tuesday Jazz Presentation will help you understand further. At the very end of this long set you will be brought back to earth and/or your senses, depending on where you are. Either way, it will smoothly land you back to your everyday life but you will feel better about yourself! Jazz helps you cope with everyday obstacles and most importantly, keeps you sane! It’s good to expose yourself with Jazz and unfortunately makes you feel sorry for those who just don’t have time to listen to it. Check the schedule link (Tuesday April 2nd) for play times, ENJOY!!!!

Great “Live” Video:

 

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Here’s a very entertaining 1956 Hard Bop album named “After Hours.” It perfectly achieves the purpose of placing the listener in that familiar laid back, wee hours scenario, that only a Jazz club can offer. Listening and absorbing the special sounds from these very talented musicians. Four songs in total, two upbeat but sensually soft tunes with strong emphasis on the bass and drums. The other two songs, stylishly classy and with that certain relaxing swerving feeling of confidence behind them. You’re there, you can feel it, the mood is so ever present! That’s the beauty of Jazz, my fellow Jazz con Class listeners. Check the always reliable schedule link for play times, enjoy!

About the album:

After Hours album by Kenny Burrell / Thad Jones /Wess / Frank Wess was released Dec 05, 1991 on the Original Jazz Classics label. All tracks have been digitally remastered from original analog master tapes. After Hours songs Although Thad Jones’ name appears first on this CD reissue, pianist Mal Waldron is actually the session’s main force. After Hours album Waldron contributed all four selections (all of which are worthwhile, even if none caught on) and is a key soloist with the sextet, which also includes trumpeter Jones, Frank Wess on tenor and flute, guitarist Kenny Burrell, bassist Paul Chambers and drummer Art Taylor. After Hours CD music Fine straight-ahead music…..Read More

Photograph: Copyright of Terry Cryer

Photograph: Copyright of Terry Cryer

More on Frank Wess (Biography):

One of the first major jazz flutists, Frank Wess has also been a top Lester Young-influenced tenorman, an expert first altoist, and an occasional composer/arranger — certainly a valuable man to have around. Early on he toured with Blanche Calloway, served in the military, and had stints with Billy Eckstine Orchestra (1946), Eddie Heywood, Lucky Millinder, and R&B star Bull Moose Jackson. That was all just a prelude to Wess’ important period with Count Basie’s big band, from 1953-1964. His flute playing, so expertly utilized in Neal Hefti’s arrangements, gave the Basie Orchestra a fresh new sound, and his cool-toned tenor contrasted well with the more passionate sound of fellow tenor Frank Foster; Wess also had opportunities to play alto with the classic big band…….Learn More

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