Currently viewing the tag: "Herbie Hancock"

Recorded in 1964 this album “It’s Time” was surely ahead of it’s time, as you will understand further when reading the description below. Although it states, “walks the line between modal post-bop and free jazz”, I disagree. It is a combination of both jazz styles but it is very balanced and works great! Drummer Roy Haynes helps keep it blended together and allows both Jazz styles (Free Jazz and Modal Jazz) to make sense. If anything, its more of an Avant-Garde type of jazz style and if the Jazz Con Class listeners here would like to listen to Free Jazz specifically, then they should check the playlist link and find out when that particular playlists airs. Outstanding musicianship by all 5 Jazz masters, great stuff! Check the schedule link, listen to album and be the judge, enjoy!

About this album:

Recorded in 1964, Jackie McLean’s It’s Time was only available on CD in the United States as part of a four-disc Mosaic set of his complete Blue Note recordings between 1964-1966. The band here includes trumpeter Charles Tolliver, pianist Herbie Hancock, bassist Cecil McBee, and drummer Roy Haynes. The music was written entirely by either Tolliver or McLean and walks the line between modal post-bop and free jazz. It came hot on the heels of McLean’s first forays into these waters on 1963’s One Step Beyond and Destination Out!. There is more to it than that, of course; chordal improvisation still plays a large part in the music on this fine record. Hancock’s solo on the opening “Cancellation” is the most angular thing here, and the tempo is simply breathtaking. McLean’s butt funky “Das’ Dat,” which follows, owes a debt to Horace Silver to be sure, but the blues element, which is in the tune’s head, is pure Jackie McLean. McLean’s own playing isn’t particularly adventurous, though he pushes his tone to the limits at times……Learn More

More on Roy Haynes:

A veteran drummer long overshadowed by others, but finally in the 1990s gaining recognition for his talents and versatility, Roy Haynes has been a major player for half a century. He worked early on with the Sabby Lewis big band, Frankie Newton, Luis Russell (1945-1947), and Lester Young (1947-1949). After some engagements with Kai Winding, Haynes was a member of the Charlie Parker Quintet (1949-1952); he also recorded during this era with Bud Powell, Wardell Gray, and Stan Getz. Haynes toured the world with Sarah Vaughan (1953-1958); played with Thelonious Monk in 1958; led his own group; and gigged with George Shearing, Lennie Tristano, Eric Dolphy, and Getz (1961). He was Elvin Jones’ occasional substitute with John Coltrane’s classic quartet during 1961-1965, toured with Getz (1965-1967), and was with Gary Burton (1967-1968). In addition to touring with Chick Corea (1981 and 1984) and Pat Metheny (1989-1990), Haynes has led his own Hip Ensemble on and off during the past several decades…..Learn More 

I ran into this album just the other day while searching for more Nat Adderley, the mostly unmentioned younger brother of the great Cannonball and an excellent Cornetist. Surprisingly he is featured on the trumpet in this album and is joined by an all-star supporting cast. They are Joe Henderson, Herbie Hancock, J.J. Johnson and many more. The name of the album Jazz Con Class will be featuring is Sayin’ Somethin’ and consists of 8 songs.

More on album:

Cornetist Nat Adderley was at the peak of his powers in the mid-1960’s. This Atlantic issue has four quintet numbers with tenor-saxophonist Joe Henderson (three also feature pianist Herbie Hancock) plus four tunes in which Nat is part of an 11-piece group. He plays quite well on such songs as “Cantaloupe Island,” “Hippodelphia,” “Gospellete” and even the then-current pop tune “Call Me,” making this set one to search for. ~ Scott Yanow…..Read More

This an interesting statement from Nat Adderley that I found while searching for more information on this album. It also points out the songs each musician participated in:

I have always believed that, no matter what the reason, the music always speaks for itself. I consciously went into this recording with an idea in mind that I wanted to show that music is music. That there is not such a big gap between blues and avant-garde. That the gap is in the labeling of the music rather than the music itself. All music is to be listened to and enjoyed, if possible, and no one should limit himself to just one type of music. If the musician is not limited, the listener should not be limited either. Open-mindedness is the answer. – Nat Adderley……. Learn More

Look forward to listening to the album feature for a couple of weeks, check the Schedule link for play time. ENJOY!

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