Currently viewing the tag: "Freddie Hubbard"

TheArtistryOfFreddieHubbardCover

An exceptional album that truly exemplifies Freddie Hubbard’s artistry on the trumpet. Considered to me as one of the best Jazz trumpet in the history of this improvised art form. Not to mention, Freddie Hubbard also was another important contributor to the evolution of Jazz from Bebop to contemporary classic Jazz. Besides having Curtis Fuller, Tommy Flanagan, Art Davis and Louis Hayes to help record this beauty, there was John Gilmore on tenor. Gilmore is mentioned below but I added a pretty detailed biography (New York Times-Obituary) and placed it after the description. Gilmore was an intricate part of the Sun Ra Arkestra, which I will be featuring in the near future. Not to get away from the featured album here, “The Artistry of Freddie Hubbard,” the Jazz Con Class Radio listeners will enjoy the leadership and command of Freddie Hubbard on this 1962 recording. Check the schedule link for play times.

About the album:

Digitally remastered by Erick Labson (MCA Music Media Studios). This 1962 effort was Freddie Hubbard’s first recording under his own name for Impulse! Fellow Jazz Messenger Curtis Fuller and newcomer John Gilmore color the proceedings with added trombone and tenor saxophone, respectively. These rock-solid post-bop horn players are backed by the formidable rhythm section of Tommy Flanagan on piano, Art Davis on bass, and Louis Hayes on drums. Hubbard’s shimmering style and clear tone show a clear debt to the late Clifford Brown and a nod to the bold sonic curiosity of John Coltrane. These are some hot young players pushing a classic format forward. The opening track is Duke Ellington’s intoxicating “Caravan.” The horns play the theme loosely above the dark undercurrent of Davis’ and Hayes’ playing. The piece explodes into a Hubbard solo that shows why he was the most talked-about young trumpeter of that era. The exceptional……Read More

JohnGilmoreImage

John Gilmore Biography (New York Times-Obituary):

John Gilmore, a tenor saxophonist who helped define the sound of the avant-garde during four decades with the Sun Ra Arkestra, died on Sunday at Germantown Hospital in Philadelphia. He was 63 and lived in Philadelphia.

The cause was emphysema, said Danny Thompson, a longtime baritone saxophonist with the band.

Mr. Gilmore was one of the pioneers of the fierce, screaming, overblown solos that were an essential part of the 1960’s avant-garde, in particular a major influence on John Coltrane. Because he was a sideman rather than a band leader, his efforts were often overlooked by non-musicians. But he was an integral part of a watershed change in 1960’s jazz, and a stirring soloist throughout his years with the Arkestra.

Mr. Gilmore was born in Summit, Miss., and grew up in Chicago. He began playing clarinet at 14, and performed in bands while serving in the Air Force from 1948 to 1951. He played in a group led by Earl Hines in 1952, and in 1953 joined a trio led by Sun Ra. The trio quickly grew into a big band, billed as the Myth-Science Arkestra or the Solar Arkestra, and played music that ranged from straightforward swing-band arrangements to percussion ensembles, chants about outer space and early free jazz……Learn More

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OpenSesameCover

Oh yes! This is a great Freddie Hubbard album to treasure and for three reasons. First of all, its his debut album as a leader. Secondly, he has the support from three monster Jazz musicians, Tina Brooks (Tenor Sax), McCoy Tyner (Piano), Clifford Jarvis (Drums) and Sam Jones on the Bass. Lastly, it’s Hard Bop at its very best, this album is ranked up there with all the greatest Jazz recordings. “Open Sesame” will be featured for a week or so, check the schedule link for play times. ENJOY!

About the album:

Open Sesame (1960) was Freddie Hubbard’s first record as a leader. If it was his only record it would be legendary, but within two years he had recorded four better ones. What raised the other records above Open Sesame was the drummers: Philly Joe Jones, Elvin Jones, and Louis Hayes. There is nothing wrong with Clifford Jarvis—he swings, he interacts with the other players, and he fits the band’s conservative concept. But on his best records Hubbard fed off his drummer’s energy. That does not happen here.

According to the liner notes Tina Brooks was studying with Jackie McLean at the time of this session, and he does mirror McLean’s penetrating, bluesy sound. He solos with logic and passion but without McLean’s fire and edge. As a writer Brooks contributes the two best tunes of the session: “Open Sesame,” a close relative to Sonny Rollins’ “Airegin”, and “Gypsy Blue,” a blues that inspires Hubbard…….Read More

HubTonesCover

The early 60’s is where you could hear tiny little hints of Avant-Garde in Hard Bop and most often when Herbie Hancock was behind the piano. Hard Bop was still in full swing and this album is certainly no exception but different elements were slowly being introduced. Let’s not forget Free Jazz was in full swing also (since 1958), so something was trickling in from somewhere already. “Hub-Tones” is considered Freddie Hubbard’s signature album as you will read below and will prove itself to the Jazz Con Class listeners. Personally, I feel “Ready for Freddie” (1961) was where he proved to me that he can be an ultimate band leader. Either way, you can’t lose! Check the schedule link for play times, enjoy!

About the Album:

The Rudy Van Gelder Edition of HUB-TONES includes an essay by Bob Digitally remastered using 24-bit technology by Rudy Van Gelder (1998, Van Gelder Studio, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey). This is part of the Blue Note Rudy Van Gelder Editions series. Freddie Hubbard’s HUB-TONES, a consummate Blue Note date from the early ’60s, is the trumpeter’s most highly acclaimed disc. Hubbard fronts a standard quintet here, with fine support from James Spaulding, Herbie Hancock, Reggie Workman, and Clifford Jarvis. The trumpeter’s style is more clearly defined than on past efforts with a signature approach that Hubbard would continue throughout the remainder of the hard bop era. Indeed, this particular session signaled Hubbard’s arrival as one of the giants of the trumpet and a leader of modern jazz. Significantly, HUB-TONES establishes Hubbard as a masterful composer as well as an interpreter of standards. The opening “You’re My Everything” is one of the latter, but the remainder of the cuts are Hubbard’s. The lightly swinging “Prophet Jennings” features a muted melody accompanied by Spaulding’s delicate flute. The classic title track……Read More

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TheBlackAngelCover

Here’s a sort of introduction/debut album of Freddie Hubbard in accordance to the new wave type of Jazz started by Miles Davis. Hubbard only displays his contribution on the first track named “Spacetrack” and as you will read below on the album description the rest of the tracks fall back to a more Hard Bopish style. Freddie Hubbard eventually created his own style of Jazz from there on and didn’t really follow the path Miles set. Miles’ style was very sophisticated and did over-improvise in a avant-garde manner but was organized and followed its own unique format, he kept it real and understandable. And although he toyed with it, Miles never did enter that Free Jazz zone. Hubbard improvised plenty in his future recordings, he was certainly avant-garde(ish) but he added the “Soul” factor to his songs. His Jazz focused more on the urban youth movement adding that electronic funky beat and in the process did not exclude the Latin presence/influence which was also very strong in the late 60’s. For me in particular, I like Hubbard’s style more than Miles. The Jazz Con Class listeners here should understand that I personally identify with it more because I grew up in the New York City metropolitan area. Also and very important to me, Hubbard didn’t abandon the Hard Bop style, he was more “old school” you could say. He eventually stayed away from the Jazzfusion movement that started afterwards, in the early to mid 70’s. Hubbard continued on with his style and came out with four popular recording after this album, they were Red Clay, First Light, Straight Life, and Sky Dive. The Black Angel” will be featured for a week or so, check the schedule link for play times, enjoy!

About the Album:

Digitally remastered by Gene Paul (DB Plus, New York, New York). Freddie Hubbard released The Black Angel in the same year as the landmark Miles Davis album Bitches Brew. Its obvious Hubbard wanted to appeal to the emerging crossover rock/jazz crowd of the era. The presence of bop, however, still permeated Hubbard’s playing, unlike Miles who had long since dropped the form. The opening Hubbard composition “Spacetrack” contains fiery avant garde interplay between Hubbard, James Spaulding on alto and Kenny Barron’s electric piano. Thanks to Spaulding and bassist Reggie Workman, much of the playing here maintains intensity. The other Hubbard penned originals, “Gittin Down” is an urgent hard swinging boogaloo and the ballad “Eclipse” features Spaulding on flute and Barron on piano. “Coral Keys” written by Walter Bishop, Jr. and Barron’s “Black Angel have a Latin tinge highlighted by Spaulding’s soaring flute…..Read More

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