Currently viewing the tag: "Dexter Gordon"

DexterBlowsHotColdCover

Jazz fans like most true music fans, know when someone is exceptional and stand out but they try exploring for others who could be even better. This is a great way to be and only helps them further in learning of other great musicians. In Classic/Traditional Jazz, there are so many great musicians that it becomes a grueling task for these fanatics but then again, they have quite a bit of fun doing so. Also, more importantly, the expansion of their musical range of knowledge only increases. They learn of different techniques and styles of delivering the music, following the unknown direction they are taken until they are exhausted and cannot go any further. They begin to make decisions and fall into the trap of certain musicians, they become their favorites. For a while, that is, as they hear another musician and begin to admire him or her even more. This is a great feeling and can only be categorized as another form of Freedom. Classic/Traditional Jazz sure gives you this opportunity because of its high standards and of course, the improvisational nature of it.

In the process of evaluating these musicians, one creates a virtual list of their favorites. In Jazz, it becomes a real struggle, as only the real interested fans know. Nevertheless, they do produce their own individual list of their favorites, no matter how long it is and how long it takes (can take YEARS!). Eventually, they come to some type of so-called conclusion, well, they think! Then all of a sudden, they hear an artist from the bottom of their list, which they had discarded for a while and pick up something else, oh no, the list changes again, LoL!! Dexter Gordon is the perfect example. You know he’s great but you somehow forget. Classic/Traditional Jazz has an infinite amount of personal satisfaction and nobody will ever get tired of it, it’s impossible!

Here’s a real classic 1955 album of his that features both, sweet ballads and fast paced Jazzy songs. For this reason this album was named “Dexter Blows Hot and Cold” and I will be featuring here for the Jazz Con Class listeners. Check the Schedule link for play times, enjoy!

About the Album:

DEXTER BLOWS HOT AND COOL was released at the outset of the saxophonist’s hard-bop period. Often referred to as the horn player who served as the bridge between swing and bop styles, Gordon lives up to the definition with his combination of edgy, harmonic complexity and cool, Lester Young-inspired lyricism. An outstanding example of the latter can be found in the practically flawless version of “Cry Me A River,” in which Gordon’s tenor paints sound pictures of exquisite, aching beauty. The driving, exuberant energy of such tracks as “Rhythm Mad” and “I Hear Music” shows that, while Dexter was influenced heavily by the swing saxophonists, he is still firmly rooted in the bop movement and owes as much to Parker as he does to Hawkins and Young. But Gordon’s style is his own, as evidenced by his bright, earthy tone and unique expressive vocabulary…..Read More

Talk about “Tenor Madness” this is a perfect example! This is a great album that falls into the Avant-Garde era and features two greats, Dexter Gordon and Booker Ervin jamming together. They played in harmony and with absolutely no intent to outdo one another. They took their respected turns and produced FOUR dynamic songs. They have their own distinctive sounds so you definitely know who’s playing and when. I will be featuring this album, “Setting the Pace” for a couple of weeks or so and then place the tracks on the Avant-garde Playlist. Check the Schedule Link to learn when I will be airing it. Enjoy!

More about this album:

Recorded in Munich, Germany on October 27, 1965. Includes liner notes by David A. Himmelstein and Michael Morgan.

Digitally remastered by Phil De Lancie (1992, Fantasy Studios, Berkeley, California).

This CD reissue has the complete contents of two former LPs, both recorded at the same session. With very stimulating playing by pianist Jaki Byard, bassist Reggie Workman and drummer Alan Dawson, tenors Booker Ervin and Dexter Gordon battle it out on marathon (19 and 22 1/2 minute) versions of “Setting the Pace” and “Dexter’s Deck.” Although Gordon is in good form, Ervin (who sometimes takes the music outside) wins honors…..Learn More

I will be Featuring this great album “One Flight Up” also and for an indefinite time. Take a look at the schedule link for times that it will be aired. Dexter Gordon is considered to be one of the best to pick up a tenor sax. Let me send you over to a great website dedicated to him, here. You can purchase the album here.

About the Album:

Gordon takes his time stretching out over the forms, which are particularly drawn out to begin with. Drew’s “Coppin’ the Haven” is a more concise continuation of the effort to reconcile the modal approach with the use of more bop-like changes. “Darn That Dream,” a ballad feature for the leader, is done as a quartet, as is the one Gordon composition “Kong Neptune,” a track not released on the original LP. A particularly interesting aspect of this disc is the chance to hear bassist Niels–Henning Orsted Pedersen making one of his earliest recorded appearances…….Learn More

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