Currently viewing the tag: "Charles Tolliver"

Impact(Enja)Cover

This a great “Live” album and the listeners of Jazz Con Class will enjoy it very much. I ran into it while searching for more albums of Charles Tolliver. The name of this album is “Impact” but please do not confuse it with an earlier recorded album with the same exact name. This is the Enja version and was recorded live in Germany in 1972. I searched for reviews online and could not find anything close to a more accurate description/review of this album, than the one below. Excellent album, check the schedule link for play times.

About the album (Most Accurate review from Stuart Jefferson, on Amazon.com):

One disc 73 minutes approximately. Digitally remastered. The sound is very clean and has a warmth,which is sometimes lacking in live recordings and/or through the remastering process. This disc features Charles Tolliver -flugelhorn,Stanley Cowell-piano,Ron Mathewson-bass,and Alvin Queen-drums.

Anyone with more than a passing interest in jazz will know all the above players. All of them have played with both many known and unknown musicians/groups for many years. This particular recording is taken from a live concert in Germany, in 1972. Don’t let the date fool you into thinking that this is “old”jazz-not worth hearing. This recording could sit alongside some of the more forward thinking releases on Blue Note Records,or any other labels you might happen to think of. Right now I have to say that I feel it’s a shame that music of this caliber is only truly appreciated,by and large,in Europe. For this is some excellent post be-bop played at it’s finest.

Both the bassist and drummer hold things together and give these tunes a real grounding,while at the same time they never lose that feeling of swing so important to this type of music. Tolliver’s playing is always right on the mark. Never cluttering up his sound with to many notes,he leaves just enough space between the notes so that the music breathes and seems to come alive. Likewise Cowell-his playing,no matter if he’s filling in spaces or is soloing,is always of the highest caliber.

After a short introduction of the players,the first track gets off to a rousing start and doesn’t really let up. The same could be said for the second track. On the third track the entire group slows way down for some beautiful ensemble playing,which gives way to some fine solo work by Cowell and Tolliver. On this track,like others,Mathewson’s bass playing is very sensitive and fits in the pocket very well indeed. The drummer knows when to hold back and just keep things moving along without calling attention to himself. The fourth track has some intense playing alongside some quieter passages. This track really feels like this group has been playing together(whether true or not) for a long while. The weaving of instruments,the ebb and flow of sound,all give this track a real identity. This edition of this album contains two previously unreleased tracks,for an extra twenty-five minutes of music. Track five starts out with a bit of a “soul-jazz” feel to it. It’s different than the previous tracks,but gives a broader view of these fine musicians,and is still in the post be-bop mode. Tolliver is in fine form here,as is Cowell. Both play over and around each other,and is a nice change of pace. The last track starts out with all four players,and then gives way to Tolliver’s horn. There is a drum solo shortly into this track,and not being a fan of such,I will let the individual listener make up his own mind……Read More

Recorded in 1964 this album “It’s Time” was surely ahead of it’s time, as you will understand further when reading the description below. Although it states, “walks the line between modal post-bop and free jazz”, I disagree. It is a combination of both jazz styles but it is very balanced and works great! Drummer Roy Haynes helps keep it blended together and allows both Jazz styles (Free Jazz and Modal Jazz) to make sense. If anything, its more of an Avant-Garde type of jazz style and if the Jazz Con Class listeners here would like to listen to Free Jazz specifically, then they should check the playlist link and find out when that particular playlists airs. Outstanding musicianship by all 5 Jazz masters, great stuff! Check the schedule link, listen to album and be the judge, enjoy!

About this album:

Recorded in 1964, Jackie McLean’s It’s Time was only available on CD in the United States as part of a four-disc Mosaic set of his complete Blue Note recordings between 1964-1966. The band here includes trumpeter Charles Tolliver, pianist Herbie Hancock, bassist Cecil McBee, and drummer Roy Haynes. The music was written entirely by either Tolliver or McLean and walks the line between modal post-bop and free jazz. It came hot on the heels of McLean’s first forays into these waters on 1963’s One Step Beyond and Destination Out!. There is more to it than that, of course; chordal improvisation still plays a large part in the music on this fine record. Hancock’s solo on the opening “Cancellation” is the most angular thing here, and the tempo is simply breathtaking. McLean’s butt funky “Das’ Dat,” which follows, owes a debt to Horace Silver to be sure, but the blues element, which is in the tune’s head, is pure Jackie McLean. McLean’s own playing isn’t particularly adventurous, though he pushes his tone to the limits at times……Learn More

More on Roy Haynes:

A veteran drummer long overshadowed by others, but finally in the 1990s gaining recognition for his talents and versatility, Roy Haynes has been a major player for half a century. He worked early on with the Sabby Lewis big band, Frankie Newton, Luis Russell (1945-1947), and Lester Young (1947-1949). After some engagements with Kai Winding, Haynes was a member of the Charlie Parker Quintet (1949-1952); he also recorded during this era with Bud Powell, Wardell Gray, and Stan Getz. Haynes toured the world with Sarah Vaughan (1953-1958); played with Thelonious Monk in 1958; led his own group; and gigged with George Shearing, Lennie Tristano, Eric Dolphy, and Getz (1961). He was Elvin Jones’ occasional substitute with John Coltrane’s classic quartet during 1961-1965, toured with Getz (1965-1967), and was with Gary Burton (1967-1968). In addition to touring with Chick Corea (1981 and 1984) and Pat Metheny (1989-1990), Haynes has led his own Hip Ensemble on and off during the past several decades…..Learn More 

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