Currently viewing the tag: "Cannonball Adderley"

74MilesAwayCover

74 Miles Away” is a great Cannonball Adderley album and the main reason why is because it was recorded live. All Cannonball albums are Jazz collector items but his live ones are extraordinary. Jazz musicians of this era were very talented and their best way of proving it was to evaluate them in a live setting. Its really the only way to judge a musician, of any genre, how good are they when they play live? I cannot stress it enough, this is a REAL CLASSIC!

About the album:

“Live,” whether used as an adjective or a verb, seems singularly appropriate when it is applied to Julian “Cannonball” Adderley and his Quintet. No jazz group presently active seems to come alive more buoyantly on the bandstand, and no other combo has benefited more fully from the advantages of recording live.

This latest session was a triply happy occasion for the Adderleys, since it marked a family reunion. Julian and Nat had brought their wives to Hollywood. Mr. & Mrs. Adderley Sr. were in town on a visit from Florida, visiting with their sons, and having a ball. Mr. Adderley, who used to be a cornetist, commented after one of Nat’s solos: “You sound almost as good as I used to.” During “I Remember Bird,” he said: “I remember me!” Their radiant pride was an additional incentive to the two sons, as the recording got under way before a hip and responsive crowd.

Cannonball, of course, is the orator supreme among jazz combo leaders. He neither ignores his listeners nor puts them on nor condescends to them; he addresses them as if they were new found friends. It is in this spirit that you hear the session start; after being presented to the audience by KBCA disc jockey Jay Rich, Julian introduces the opening number, “Do Do Do.”

All the way from the opening vamp by Joe Zawinul on electric piano, this Nat Adderley tune has the spirit of the blues, transmuted into 32-bar chorus form. As you might deduce from the subtitle (“What Now Is Next”), this beguilingly basic theme has been equipped with lyrics (by Gail Fisher, the prettiest songwriter in town), and will no doubt be heard as a vocal vehicle in due course, following a pattern established by Miss Fisher’s lyrics for “Mercy, Mercy, Mercy!”……Read More

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Bought this Album when it first came out. The Jazz Lab on Riverside is a great record too. Gigi Gryce gets no reconition. Great composer,Sax man and leader.

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TheCannoballAdderleySeptetInNewYorkFeatured

This a great Cannonball album which was recorded “Live” in New York City’s Village Vanguard on January 12th and 14th of the year 1962. The official name of the album is The Cannonball Adderley Sextet in New York.”  I’m placing the complete album, including the introductions, which the listeners here on Jazz Con Class will find very interesting. But I don’t need to go any further, Cannonball will explain it to you himself. Check the schedule link for play times. This album will be featured for about two weeks like I always do and then will be placed on the G4 Playlist and where most of the “Live” recorded songs can be heard, great stuff, ENJOY!

About the Album:

In this volume from Concord’s Keepnews Collection, the only real addition to this excellent Cannonball Adderley Sextet live date from the Village Vanguard is a new set of reminiscences from producer Orrin Keepnews himself. As always, Keepnews is candid, sometimes self-depreciating but not reluctant to pat himself on the back, uniquely insightful, and compulsively readable. Anytime you have as good a writer as he is providing first-hand source material, give him all the space he wants. This was the recording debut of the Adderley Sextet, with Cannonball waxing eloquently and swingingly on alto, brother Nat charging ahead on cornet, and the versatile Yusef Lateef (who had joined the band only three weeks earlier) adding a bit of an edge on tenor, flute, and unusually for a jazz wind player, oboe on the odd, dirge-like “Syn-Anthesia.” There is plenty of talk from Cannonball as well, and once again, we miss his genial, witty authority as a communicator…….Learn More

Kenny Clarke’s album “Bohemia after Dark” was one of eight albums recorded in the forgotten Cafe Bohemia and which was located on 15 Barrow Street in the West Village section of Manhattan. It was the earliest recording of Cannonball Adderley and featured an all-star cast (check names on album cover), I will eventually feature them all. I featured Charles Mingus’ recording and wrote a post about it here. Check the schedule link for play times. Here’s an interesting anecdote on how Cannonball Adderley was discovered:

On 19 June 1955 Julian and Nat Adderley arrived in New York on a trip for the former to work on his Master’s Degree at New York University. That first night in the city the brothers went to the Café Bohemia to hear the Oscar Pettiford band, which was the club’s house band at the time. Jerome Richardson, who was the group’s regular saxophonist was unavailable that evening due to a recording session. Pettiford asked Charlie Rouse – who was in the audience – if he would sit in, however Rouse did not have his saxophone with him. Pettiford then noticed another audience member, Adderley, who had a saxophone case with him and told Rouse to ask this unknown man if he could borrow his horn. Instead of lending the horn Adderley asked if he could sit in with the group. Reluctantly, the leader complied and allowed Adderley to play. Overnight Adderley rose to prominence on the New York jazz scene. On 21 June he officially played his first night at the Bohemia; on 28 June he made his first recording with Pettiford’s group; on 14 July he recorded his first album as a leader. By October 1957 he was a member of the Miles Davis Sextet.

About this Album:

Bohemia After Dark album by Cannonball Adderley / Kenny Clarke was released Feb 11, 2003 on the Savoy Jazz label. Along with Max Roach, Kenny Clarke was one of the definitive drummers of jazz’s original bebop movement. By the time of the BOHEMIA AFTER DARK sessions (in June 1955), Clarke was firmly established as a bandleader. He probably didn’t know it at the time but Clarke also made jazz history here……..Learn More

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