Currently viewing the tag: "Cafe Bohemia"

JazzALaBohemiaCover

And yet another recording from the famous Cafe Bohemia, a night club that only lasted two years but hosted an extraordinary amount of legendary jazz musicians. I have written posts for each of the “live” recordings that took place there, like Kenny Dorham’s “Round About Midnight at the Cafe Bohemia,” “Mingus at the Bohemia,” The Jazz Messengers at the Café Bohemia, Volume 1-2,” “George Wallington Quintet at the Bohemia,” andBohemia After Dark.This live recorded album here is “Jazz A La Bohemia” with the Randy Weston Trio (Ahmed Abdul-Malik on bass, drummer Wilbert Hogan) and features baritone saxophonist Cecil Payne. The Jazz Con Class Radio listeners should take a look at the links I provided above and learn more about Cafe’ Bohemia. I gathered as much information that I could get a hold of online, enjoy!

About the album:

Digitally remastered by Gary Hobish (1990, Fantasy Studios, Berkeley). This is a live set recorded at New York City’s Cafe Bohemia in 1956. As on Randy Weston’s WITH THESE HANDS album, baritone saxophonist Cecil Payne makes a guest appearance, augmenting the rhythm section of bass player Ahmed Abdul-Malik and drummer Al Dreares. While lacking the dimension of a controlled studio session, the interplay here is warm and genuine and the audience justifiably captivated. “You Go to My Head” shows the clear influence of Thelonious Monk (an influence that shares space with Weston’s lifelong interest in African…..Read More

KennyDorhamRoundAboutMidnightCafeBohemia

Here another promised installation of a live recording from the Cafe Bohemia. As of right now I have posted 4 historical sessions, they were:

1.Album Feature: Mingus at the Bohemia

2.Kenny Clarke’s album “Bohemia after Dark” and more anecdotes on Cafe Bohemia

3.Featured Album: Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers “Live” at the Cafe Bohemia Vol. One

4. “More Cafe Bohemia this time George Wallington Quintet Live at Cafe Bohemia is featured.”

There are a few more (I will post them also) but this particular one is my definite favorite. It is actually a two CD set and goes by the name “Complete ‘Round About Midnight at the Cafe Bohemia.” Great lineup but no sign of the real notables of that time, as you have the underrated J.R. Montrose on tenor and Arthur Edgehill on the drums. The other four making up this powerful classy sextet are of course, Kenny Dorham, Bobby Timmons, Sam Jones and Kenny Burrell. It was recorded on May 31, 1956. This album was one that was recorded but there were many other live sessions that were not. All these Jazz greats played and/or hung out in the Cafe Bohemia, which in a span of 2 years time was closed. I have placed 8 songs (Not in Order) from the album and will give the Jazz Con Class listeners here enough insight of the quality of the music and the “Live” feel of being there! I will feature 8 songs from the album and they will not be in order. Check the schedule link for play times, ENJOY!

About the album:

Recorded live at the Cafe Bohemia, New York, New York on May 31, 1956. Includes liner notes by Bob Blumenthal. This is part of Blue Note Records “Rudy Van Gelder Editions” series. During the spring and summer of 1956, trumpeter Kenny Dorham recorded two studio albums with his Jazz Prophets, a small hard bop band involving tenor saxophonist J.R. Monterose and a rhythm section of pianist Dick Katz, bassist Sam Jones and drummer Arthur Edgehill. On May 31 of that year, Dorham’s group performed live at the Café Bohemia with Bobby Timmons at the piano and guitarist Kenny Burrell sitting in on all but the first of four sets. Originally engineered by Rudy Van Gelder and remastered by him in 2001, Blue Note’s 2002 double-disc “Complete” Dorham Café Bohemia edition combines every usable track taped during this exceptionally fine evening of live jazz. The word “understated” has sometimes been used to describe the music played by Dorham’s band on this night in 1956; this is only appropriate if Dorham is compared with intense individuals like Fats Navarro or Dizzy Gillespie. Dorham’s jazz was perhaps more intimate and accessible precisely because his horn had an earthier tone, almost like that of a cornet…..Read More

This is the 3rd album featured here on Jazz Con Class recorded live from The Cafe Bohemia. A club that was located in Manhattan, New York and that only lasted for about two years. Such a short time but at a pivotal period of Jazz, when many greats were just beginning to emerge into the scene. They would stop by and sit in to get recognized. It was also a hangout for them and where they felt very comfortable. This is the first combination that Art Blakey assembled for his Jazz Messengers and the official name of this particular album simply was “Art Blakey and the Jazz messengers at the Cafe Bohemia Vol. One.” Don’t forget “Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers at the Cafe Bohemia Vol 2,” both from the same night. Check the schedule link for play times.

About the Album:

Art Blakey & The Jazz Messengers: Art Blakey (drums); Hank Mobley (tenor saxophone); Kenny Dorham (trumpet); Horace Silver (piano); Doug Watkins (bass).

Recorded live at the Cafe Bohemia, New York, New York on November 23, 1955. Originally released on Bluenote (1507). Includes liner notes by Bob Blumenthal.

The Art Blakey/Horace Silver alliance that formed the Jazz Messengers in the ’50s kicked off one the greatest ensembles in the history of jazz. This first volume of a live set from the famous Cafe Bohemia in 1955 features one of the earliest line-ups with Kenny Dorham (trumpet), Hank Mobley (saxophone) and Doug Watkins (bass) along with Silver and Blakey. This is the pure, original Messengers sound that reflected the best of what became known as ’50s post-bop, also made popular by Miles Davis’ first great quintet of the same period. The grooves are swinging, the soloists are cool and the spirit of the blues is in the air……Learn More

More on Cafe Bohemia:

A June 13, 1956 Village Voice article describes the club’s origins as a jazz spot:

“First Birthday for Jazz Club That Started ‘by Accident’”

What Jimmy Garofolo, 42, knew about progressive jazz one year ago wouldn’t have filled a single bar – of music. What he’s learned since, however, was filling his bar – the Cafe Bohemia – every night last week, when the nightspot celebrated its first anniversary as a jazz club.

Seating only 100, the tiny Barrow Street club has become the only place in America with a policy of “progressive jazz only.”

“No rock ‘n roll, no vocalists, no big bands, no nuttin’ except small jazz combos,” Garofolo told The Voice Sunday [June 10, 1956]. “Once Birdland and Basin Street were the mecca of all true jazzmen; now a lot of them won’t go on the road until they’ve played the Bohemia, too. We’re a small place and we’ve given many a new outfit their first chance.”

Half a dozen LP record albums have been cut on the premises during the past 12 months, and their covers, along with others, line the walls in symmetrical rows. They include covers by the Bohemia’s two current stars – Miles Davis and Teddy Charles.

The fact that the Bohemia ever turned into a jazz club in the first place is almost accidental. Owner Garofolo, a lifelong Villager who lives across the street from his bar, explains: “For six years I tried to make the place pay, first as a bar and restaurant, then with girly shows, and then with various acts. One night I had to throw out a character who’d been drinking brandy alexanders without any money to pay for them. The next thing I knew, he was back offering to play a few weeks here to pay off his obligation – and because he wanted a regular home base from which to play when he was between engagements.

Guess Who? “Somebody told me his name was Charlie Parker and he was a saxophonist. I was pretty naive about jazz at the time and I didn’t know him from beans, but it turned out he was a big man in the jazz world.

“When I put out signs announcing he was going to play, I had a stream of people coming in wanting to know if the great Charley Parker was going to play here. It was the way they said ‘here’ that got me.”

The great Charley Parker never did get around to playing the Bohemia; he died before his engagement came up. But his prestige had done the trick – jazzophiles have jammed the place ever since.

 

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