Currently viewing the tag: "Benny Golson"

BennyGolsonAndThePhiladelphiansCover

Benny Golson was a monster on the tenor sax and could match up with the likes of Coltrane when it came to improvising, incredible! Now match him up with Lee Morgan, who when this album came out was 20 years of age. This album contains 10 songs but the first 6 songs are from the original recording and has the musicians listed on the album cover. The final four songs (7 to 10) are bonus tracks and from a different date and place, Paris, France on December 12, 1958. None of the musicians listed on the cover were not there accompanying Golson, it was totally a different gig (more below).  The Blue Note album cover was different, image above is from the original album (United Artists), which cannot be purchased. Enjoy this great rare album, a must have!

About the Album:

The title of this 1998 CD reissue is a little inaccurate. This set does have a six-song session with the all-Philadelphia crew of tenor saxophonist Benny Golson, trumpeter Lee Morgan, pianist Ray Bryant, bassist Percy Heath and drummer Philly Joe Jones. But there are also four numbers from a month later in which Golson and pianist Bobby Timmons are joined by a trio of Frenchmen: trumpeter Roger Guerin (who was actually the date’s leader), bassist Pierre Michelot and drummer Christian Garros. Ironically, the previous Swing LP had the equally inaccurate title of Benny Golson In Paris; the first date was actually cut in New York. In any case, the music is quite enjoyable, and the two dates match well together. Golson, Morgan and Bryant take excellent solos on three Golson tunes and one apiece by Bryant, John Lewis (“Afternoon In Paris”) and Gigi Gryce. The French session finds the band performing four numbers from the Jazz Messengers……Read More

GoneWithGolson

The Jazz Con Class Radio listeners will literally “be gone” with Benny Golson after listening to this downright superb album. The greatness lies within this unmatchable combination of Curtis Fuller and Golson as they play together in perfect unison. Great take on all the songs, including a great version of  “Autumn Leaves. Gone with Golson” will be featured for a week or so, check the schedule link for play times.

About the album:

Digitally remastered by Phil De Lancie (1994, Fantasy Studios, Berkeley, California). Like its same-year companion GROOVIN’ WITH GOLSON, 1959’s GONE WITH GOLSON pairs composer/arranger/saxophonist Benny Golson with trombonist Curtis Fuller (shortly after this release, the two formed the Jazztet with Art Farmer). Like GROOVIN’, GONE offers solid hard-bop fare with an aura of elegance and relaxation. Golson’s breathy tone on the tenor qualifies the mellow, in-the-cut vibe here, which is not to say the set doesn’t cook. Both Golson and Fuller (whose extremely precise trombone technique distinguishes him from most players) blow mightily through rhythmically and harmonically complex lines, yet manage keep the whole at a sophisticated reserve. Fuller contributes one of his own compositions (the smoothly swinging “A Bit of Heaven”), which fits nicely alongside Golson’s three originals (the smoky “Blues After Dark,” “Soul Me,” which pushes beyond standard gospel-derived soul-jazz, and the up-tempo “Jam for Bobbie”)……Read More

BennyGolsonImage

Biography of Benny Golson:

Benny Golson is a talented composer/arranger whose tenor playing has continued to evolve with time. After attending Howard University (1947-1950) he worked in Philadelphia with Bull Moose Jackson’s R&B band (1951) at a time when it included one of his writing influences, Tadd Dameron on piano. Golson played with Dameron for a period in 1953, followed by stints with Lionel Hampton (1953-1954), and Johnny Hodges and Earl Bostic (1954-1956). He came to prominence while with Dizzy Gillespie’s globetrotting big band (1956-1958), as much for his writing as for his tenor playing (the latter was most influenced by Don Byas and Lucky Thompson). Golson wrote such standards as “I Remember Clifford” (for the late Clifford Brown), “Killer Joe,” “Stablemates,” “Whisper Not,” “Along Came Betty,” and “Blues March” during 1956-1960. His stay with Art Blakey’s Jazz Messengers (1958-1959) was significant, and during 1959-1962 he co-led the Jazztet with Art Farmer. From that point on Golson gradually drifted away from jazz and concentrated more on working in the studios and with orchestras including spending a couple of years in Europe (1964-1966). When Golson returned to active playing in 1977, his tone had hardened and sounded much closer to Archie Shepp than to Don Byas…..Read More

ListenLiveForPosts

This is my latest featured album and it is a real “Sleeper.” The name of the album is Art Farmer/Benny Golson Meet the Jazztet” and it holds up on its own with the best of them, this is why I’m featuring it. There are many albums that somehow slip through the passionate Jazz ears and are simply ignored. Perhaps it’s just bad timing or maybe bad promoting but then again, in 1960 there was so much going on with better known Jazz musicians. There was so much groundbreaking Jazz music being produced, Hard Bop was still running strong, Free Jazz was fresh and  Post Bop/ Avant-Garde was evolving. This could only be the excuse, as this stealth classic album was not seen as it traveled under the radar. I will be featuring it for a week or so and later place it in the Hard Bop playlist. Check the schedule link to see when it will be playing, enjoy!

More on Album:

Although this CD has the same program as the original LP, it gets the highest rating because it is a hard bop classic. Not only does it include superior solos from trumpeter Art Farmer, trombonist Curtis Fuller, tenor saxophonist Benny Golson, and pianist McCoy Tyner (who was making his recording debut) along with fine backup from bassist Addison Farmer and drummer Lex Humphries, but it features the writing of Golson. Highlights include the original version of “Killer Joe” along with early renditions of “I Remember Clifford” and “Blues March.”….Learn More

Here’s a more recent video of Benny Golson playing “Killer Joe” :


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