Currently viewing the tag: "Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers"

TheoryOfArtCover

What else can I say of Art Blakey that hasn’t already been said. By far, the most influential musician in the Hard Bop era. His “Jazz Messengers” ensembles were the largest contributions to the musical art form of Jazz. With each album he recorded, Blakey introduced new talent by showcasing them to the world. The exact number of musicians he directly affected will never be known, it seems that every great Jazz musician recorded with him some time in their career. Many people do not associate Jackie McLean with the Jazz Messengers but he recorded 5 other great albums (“Hard Bop”, “Originally”, “Drum Suite”, “Ritual” and “Tough!”)  with them besides this one. The  “Theory of Art“, another perfect example of Hard Bop Jazz, will be featured for a week or so, check the schedule link for play times, ENJOY!

About the Album:

Art Blakey’s Jazz Messengers Plus Four: Art Blakey (drums); Sahib Shihab (alto saxophone); Johnny Griffin (tenor saxophone); Cecil Payne (baritone saxophone); Lee Morgan, Bill Hardman (trumpet); Melba Liston (trombone); Wynton Kelly (piano); Jimmy “Spanky” DeBrest (bass). This CD contains two unique sessions in the history of Art Blakey’s Jazz Messengers. Five numbers feature a sextet that includes both altoist Jackie McLean, who had recently left the band, and his replacement, tenor saxophonist Johnny Griffin along with trumpeter Bill Hardman; “A Night in Tunisia” best shows off this short-lived group. The remaining two numbers were unissued until this CD came out and feature Blakey heading a nonet that included future Messenger Lee Morgan, trombonist Melba Liston and Griffin. The music is consistently excellent……..Read More

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Here’s a straight forward hard bop album “The Freedom Rider” by Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers. Recorded in 1961 and in the height of this extraordinary era. Check the schedule link for play times, enjoy!

About the Album:

The title of the Jazz Messengers’ THE FREEDOM RIDER was inspired by civil rights protestors of the ’60s. The passion with which Blakey and his men play on this session is proof enough of the strong convictions at the heart of the struggles of the time. Indeed, the fire and emotion contained herein can be felt as well as heard. This session portrays the Messengers of the early ’60s (before the departure of Lee Morgan and Bobby Timmons) in fine form.

The bulk of the compositions here are by Wayne Shorter and Lee Morgan. Shorter’s swaggering “Tell It Like It Is” opens the set, fueled by Blakey’s signature shuffle beat. Later, his bouncing “El Toro” is a passionate………Learn More

Bobby Timmons’ Biography:

Bobby Timmons became so famous for the gospel and funky blues clichés in his solos and compositions that his skills as a Bud Powell-inspired bebop player have been long forgotten. After emerging from the Philadelphia jazz scene, Timmons worked with Kenny Dorham (1956), Chet Baker, Sonny Stitt, and the Maynard Ferguson Big Band. He was partly responsible for the commercial success of both Art Blakey’s Jazz Messengers and Cannonball Adderley’s Quintet. For Blakey (who he was with during 1958-1959), Timmons wrote the classic “Moanin'” and, after joining Adderley in 1959, his song “This Here” (followed later by “Dat Dere”) became a big hit; it is little wonder that Adderley was distressed when, in 1960, Timmons decided to return to the Jazz Messengers. “Dat Dere” particularly caught on……Learn More

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