Posts by: "Jose Reyes"

MelMartinJazzSaxophoneForum

Jazz Musician Mel Martin has establish an enormous following on his Saxophone Forum. It is located on Facebook and it is actually public! It is also important to note, Mel is rather serious to a point, concerning the rules of engagement. The members (940 and rapidly growing) are not subject to any strict restriction at all but need to follow a few simple rules. They are listed at the top of the forum and read as follows:

“This is a forum for fans and performers of real Jazz saxophone. Discussions are expected to be civil, intelligent and real. No smooth Jazz posts, Jam of the week posts or trolling. Looking forward to some great interaction about Jazz saxophone players and playing. Not a technical forum so please don’t go on about setups, reeds, m’pieces etc. NO ADS, LISTS or SPAM! Please avoid any “gossipy” or speculative posts discussing the personal or supposedly perceived emotional issues of any player, living or dead. This only leads to more speculation and personal opinion. Back stories, factual statements and personal insights are certainly welcome. Keep it real!”

“The spirit of the MMJSF – Great Music, Great Players!”

Simple enough to follow and actually represents the attitude and behavior for members of ANY forum to follow. Mel’s forum is rather specific though, since it concentrates on the saxophone and the talented jazz musicians who master it. Not only does it deal with the well known Tenor and Alto Saxophones but is equally represented with the Baratone and Soprano Sax also. By no means, does it eliminate the other instruments, they are equally admired as well since they are part of the music that broadcasts there. Oh yes, you will hear quite a bit of incredible recordings there, that’s actually what the forum is about! The atmosphere is very professional and at the same time, very educational. The conversations can range from interactions between two or more established jazz musicians conversing about other jazz greats, to interactions between new curious followers of jazz who are hungry to learn more about this thing called “Jazz.” Its a lot of fun and I recommend everyone of ALL ages to visit. You can’t go wrong and most importantly, will never feel intimidated, so go to Mel Martin’s Jazz Saxophone Forum (MMJSF) and have some real fun!

ShellyManneCompleteLiveAtTheBlackHawkCover

This album is a collection of all the live performances (4 CD Box Set) of Shelly Manne and his very talented band, consisting of Bass on Monty Budwig, Piano on Victor Feldman, Tenor Saxophone on Richie Kamuca, Trumpet on Joe Gordon, here’s the discography for this Box-Set. All the information needed  for the Jazz Con Class Radio to learn more about “Shelly Manne and His Men Complete Live at the Black Hawk” and about Shelly Manne himself, is found further down on this post. Enjoy!

About the album, article from Marc Myers (JazzWax):

When Shelly Manne agreed to play San Francisco’s Black  Hawk club in September 1959, he viewed the gig as a working vacation. For months, the West Coast drummer had endured a grueling schedule, spending days in Hollywood’s movie and TV studios and nights at Los Angeles-area clubs. Taking on the extended San Francisco engagement with his newly formed quintet meant a return to bop without the commercial distractions. No insistent studio contractors. No time-crazed producers. And no stress of first-take film dates.

But just a week after the Black Hawk engagement began, Manne picked up the phone and called Lester Koenig, the founder of Contemporary Records. Manne and Koenig had been close since Manne began recording extensively for the label in 1952. “I’ve never asked this before,” Manne reportedly said to Koenig during the call, “but we all feel you should come up and record the group at the club.” The next day, September 22d, Koenig arrived with recording equipment and remained at the club for three successive nights…..Read More

ShellyManneBioImage

About Shelly Manne (Wikipedia):

Shelly Manne (June 11, 1920 – September 26, 1984), born Sheldon Manne in New York City, was an American jazz drummer. Most frequently associated with West Coast jazz, he was known for his versatility and also played in a number of other styles, including Dixieland, swing, bebop, avant-garde jazz and fusion, as well as contributing to the musical background of hundreds of Hollywood films and television programs.

Family and origins:

Manne’s father and uncles were drummers. In his youth he admired many of the leading swing drummers of the day, especially Jo Jones and Dave Tough.[1] Billy Gladstone, a colleague of Manne’s father and the most admired percussionist on the New York theatrical scene, offered the teenage Shelly tips and encouragement.[2] From that time, Manne rapidly developed his style in the clubs of 52nd Street in New York in the late 1930s and 1940s.[3] His first professional job with a known big band was with the Bobby Byrne Orchestra in 1940.[4] In those years, as he became known, he recorded with jazz stars like Coleman Hawkins, Charlie Shavers, and Don Byas. He also worked with a number of musicians mainly associated with Duke Ellington, like Johnny Hodges, Harry Carney, Lawrence Brown, and Rex Stewart.[5]……Learn More

 

JazzALaBohemiaCover

And yet another recording from the famous Cafe Bohemia, a night club that only lasted two years but hosted an extraordinary amount of legendary jazz musicians. I have written posts for each of the “live” recordings that took place there, like Kenny Dorham’s “Round About Midnight at the Cafe Bohemia,” “Mingus at the Bohemia,” The Jazz Messengers at the Café Bohemia, Volume 1-2,” “George Wallington Quintet at the Bohemia,” andBohemia After Dark.This live recorded album here is “Jazz A La Bohemia” with the Randy Weston Trio (Ahmed Abdul-Malik on bass, drummer Wilbert Hogan) and features baritone saxophonist Cecil Payne. The Jazz Con Class Radio listeners should take a look at the links I provided above and learn more about Cafe’ Bohemia. I gathered as much information that I could get a hold of online, enjoy!

About the album:

Digitally remastered by Gary Hobish (1990, Fantasy Studios, Berkeley). This is a live set recorded at New York City’s Cafe Bohemia in 1956. As on Randy Weston’s WITH THESE HANDS album, baritone saxophonist Cecil Payne makes a guest appearance, augmenting the rhythm section of bass player Ahmed Abdul-Malik and drummer Al Dreares. While lacking the dimension of a controlled studio session, the interplay here is warm and genuine and the audience justifiably captivated. “You Go to My Head” shows the clear influence of Thelonious Monk (an influence that shares space with Weston’s lifelong interest in African…..Read More

SonnyRollinsPlus4Cover

There’s no better general description and anything more that I could add about this album, “Sonny Rollins Plus 4” than this one from Wikipedia. All I can write here is that if by some freak mistake, you don’t have this album, please get it and enjoy!

From Wikipedia:

Sonny Rollins Plus 4 (also released as 3 Giants!) is a jazz album by Sonny Rollins, released in 1956 on Prestige Records. On this album Rollins plays with the Clifford Brown/Max Roach Quintet, of which he was a member at the time. The album was the last full recording including pianist Richie Powell and trumpeter Clifford Brown, as both died in a car accident three months later. The material from this album was later also re-released as 3 Giants and is part of the seven CD set with Rollins’ Complete Prestige Recordings.

History:

Rollins had written his two original compositions (“Pent-Up House” and “Valse Hot”) while a sideman in the Max Roach/Clifford Brown Quintet. It was more common in the 50s for a sideman recording his own work to record with either the rhythm section or leader; thus it was unusual when Rollins recorded with the same musicians that he played with in the Quintet. Rollins had just joined the Quintet five months beforehand, replacing Harold Land, who had left New York to care for his sick wife in California…..Learn More

Rollins had been working as a janitor in Chicago at the time, spending most of his time practicing and rethinking his life (a smaller sabbatical compared to the later ones he would take). The Quintet was in Chicago as well in November 1955, and were playing at the Bee Hive Club in Hyde Park. After sitting in with the Brown/Roach Quintet at the Bee Hive, Rollins was added as the tenor saxophonist.

About the album:

Richie Powell (piano); George Morrow (bass); Max Roach (drums). 1956, Sonny Rollins was spiritually and physically rejuvenated. And on Sonny Rollins Plus 4, he’s clearly inspired by Max Roach and Clifford Brown’s depth of spirit. Multi-dimensional re-arrangements of popular songs were a Brown-Roach trademark. “Kiss and Run” is treated to a stop-and-go intro, then settles into a brisk 4/4, as Rollins, Brown, and the perennially underrated Richie Powell fashion long dancing lines. “I Feel a Song Coming On” creates tension by alternating a vamp figure with a swinging release. Rollins takes an immense solo, contrasting chanting figures and foghorn-like long tones with Parker-ish elisions, and Brown answers with buzzing figures and daring harmonic extensions. Then Roach takes things out with sweeping melodic choruses and polyrhythmic fanfares, setting the stage for a torrid tenor-trumpet duel. On “Valse Hot,” there’s an early example of a successful jazz waltz as Rollins offers up one of his most charming themes. Max Roach treats the European three with the dancing elan of an American four, and Rollins responds by floating in between the beat, syncopating in Monk-ish stabs and thrusts, as Brown answers with the kind of rhythmically complex, sweetly articulated melodic lines that have inspired every modern trumpeter……Read More

RadioNightsCover

Here’s a very unknown Cannonball Adderley “Live” album that somehow managed to be undetected. Maybe it could be the tacky album cover or maybe it just was not represented properly. This is not the first and by no means, the last unappreciated jazz album that I will learn about. Just like many others I have posted here on Jazz Con Class Radio, this album seemed to have some issues behind it, it seems that the record companies involved in its production, collectively misjudged its value and its importance. This could be one of Cannonball’s finest! “Radio Nights” was recorded in 1967/68 but unfortunately released in 1991 and that’s 16 years after Cannonball passed away, very sad indeed.

Here’s a little more about it (Wikipedia): Radio Nights is an album released in 1991 featuring previously unreleased live radio broadcasts by the Cannonball Adderley Quartet, Quintet and Sextet from New York City’s Half Note Club jazz club. They were recorded by Alan Grant and broadcast live on radio in the last week of 1967 and the first week of 1968. The montage of Adderley’s monologues are taken from a recording made at the Keystone Korner jazz club, San Francisco. At the time of the recordings, Adderley was under contract to Capitol.

Again, I hate to repeat myself over and over concerning these albums features that I post but there’s a reason. This “LIVE” album is a real classic, look more into it and listen/buy it, you’ll never regret it!

About the album:

Radio broadcasts from The Half Note in New York during the last week of 1967 and the first week of 1968 make up the set of distinctive material on Radio Nights. The live audience reaction puts the listener right there, to share in each exciting moment. Cannonball Adderley was at his best, and the ensembles remained loose. Microphone placement does considerable damage to the balance: Joe Zawinul and Nat Adderley are, at times, in the far-off distance. The leader, however, remains at the forefront and full of life. His alto soared through these classic songs night after night. Roy McCurdy and Louis Hayes propelled the unit. The Adderley brothers’ saxophone and cornet front line was always on target. Together, they made hot, straight-ahead magic. Cannonball is at his best soaring through ‘Fiddler On The Roof’ with complete freedom. Charles Lloyd joins the ensemble for ‘Work Song,’ ‘The Song My Lady Sings’ and ‘Unit Seven.’ Unfortunately, the balance prevents him from being……Read More

 

CliffordBrownParisSession

The article below is so informative that there is no reason to add anything else. I don’t know why Volume One and Volume Two are reasonably valued but Volume Three is so expensive and almost impossible to find. As Marc Myers mentions, this can be the official beginning of “Hard Bop”and he could possibly right.

About all three volumes (Marc Myers (Jazz Wax):

Trumpeter Clifford Brown is best remembered for the groundbreaking hard-bop albums he made with Max Roach for EmArcy Records starting in August 1954 and ending with his tragic death in June 1956.

Often overlooked, however, are the recordings Brown made as a sideman during the summer and fall of 1953. Like the EmArcy dates, these sessions are dynamic and cutting-edge—but for very different reasons.

Over the course of nine days—between June 11 and October 15, 1953—Brown recorded with different bands under the direction or influence of Tadd Dameron, Gigi Gryce and Quincy Jones (the photo on the right is of Brown and Gryce in Paris in 1953).

At the time, all three jazz musicians—Dameron, Gryce and Jones—were pioneering a new sophisticated harmonic sound influenced by Miles Davis’ “Birth of the Cool” recordings. But their version of cool was much tougher than the laid-back, West Coast interpretation being advanced by Gerry Mulligan and Chet Baker.

The East Coast leveraging of cool was more melodically complex and musically urgent than the Hollywood approach, which relied on contrapuntal minimalism. All you have to do is listen to Gigi Gryce’s staggeringly pretty Keeping Up With Jonesy from 1953 to hear the sizable changes taking place. In Brown’s hands, East Coast cool would become hard bop within a year.

In the summer of 1953, Brownie was at the right place at the right time after extensive healing following a horrible college auto accident in 1950. The crash left Brown with two broken legs, and he was in a full-body cast for months while undergoing skin and bone grafts. Released in May 1951, Brown spent the next year trying to regain his trumpet playing skills.

In 1953 Brown joined Tadd Dameron’s group, which featured  Idrees Sulieman on trumpet, Herb Mullins on trombone, Gigi Gryce on alto saxophone, Benny Golson on tenor, Oscar Estelle on baritone,  Dameron on piano, Percy Heath on bass and Philly Joe Jones on drums. The band recorded four beautiful Dameron originals for Prestige on June 11—Philly J.J., Choose Now, Dial B for Beauty and Theme of No Repeat.…..Learn More

SpecialIconT-Shirt

Hello Jazz Con Class Listeners! I’m very happy to announce that besides changing to a new secure server, all the methods available connecting to the stream have been restored. The Apps are picking up the stream and iTunes has the stream available also. I’m sorry for the inconvenience and thank you for your patience!

 

 

CompleteRegentSessionsCover

The multiple techniques that Pepper Adams possessed when playing the baritone sax is what made him different than the others and why he is considered to be the best for jazz fans. From Wikipedia under “Style”:

Pepper Adams was in many ways the antithesis of contemporary baritone players Gerry Mulligan and Serge Chaloff, who favored melodic cool jazz. In contrast, Adams managed to bring the cumbersome baritone into the blisteringly fast speeds of hard bop like no others had before.[13] Gary Carner, Adams’s biographer, described his style as having “very long, tumbling, double-time melodic lines. And that raw, piercing, bark-like timbre.”[7] Adams “succeeded in elevating [the baritone saxophone] to the level of all other solo instruments [with] blinding speed, penetrating timbre, distinctive sound, harmonic ingenuity, precise articulation, confident time-feel, and use of melodic paraphrase”.[14] Throughout his career, Adams consistently chose musical expression over large paychecks, as “[he] repeatedly recalled with great satisfaction his decision to play [in groups focused on musical expression] rather than to change his style to secure better paying jobs with now little-known white musicians”.[6] A large part of Adams’ appeal was that “[he] had the remarkable ability to blow low with enormous power and swing, becoming a hefty addition to big band reed sections. He also was an equally dominant voice in small groups, adding ferocious excitement and stamina”.[15]

The Complete Regent Sessions” is an amazing album that all jazz enthusiasts should own. To learn more about Pepper Adams, go to this website created and maintained by Gary Carner, author of  “Pepper Adams’ Joy Road” :

PepperAdamsJoyRoad

Pepper Adams’ Joy Road is more than a compendium of sessions and gigs done by the greatest baritone saxophone soloist in history. It’s a fascinating overview of Adams’ life and times, thanks to colorful interview vignettes, drawn from the author’s unpublished conversations with Adams and other musicians. These candid observations from jazz greats about Adams and his colleagues reveal previously unknown, behind-the-scenes drama about legendary recordings made by John Coltrane, Charles Mingus, Thelonious Monk, Dizzy Gillespie, Duke Pearson, Thad Jones, David Amram, Elvin Jones, and many others.

All types of sound material—studio recordings, private tapes and broadcasts, film scores, audience tapes, and even jingles—are listed, and Adams’ oeuvre is pushed back from 1956 to 1947, when Adams was 16 years old, before he played baritone saxophone. Because of Carner’s access to Adams’ estate, just prior to its disposition in 1987, much new discographical material is included, now verified by Adams’ date books and correspondence……..Read More

About the album:

A self-styled pre-bop era player, Pepper Adams, a product of the Motor City scene, was keenly aware of the importance of having musical roots in the past. He confessed to the influence of Harry Carney, “in the way I wanted to play the horn. See, no baritone player should be afraid of the noise it makes. Carney isn’t. He gets right down into it, inside it”. Adams made these recordings in 1957, the year Down Beat jazz critics chose him……Read More

ElectricBathCover

Here’s a big band album by the very innovative Don Ellis, which introduced an array of electric instruments. The result was a funky avant-garde styled masterpiece. “Electric Bath” was recorded in 1967 and when Jazz musicians were developing new sounds that would interest the new demanding generation of the late 60’s. This album is very unique in so many ways because it has so many cultural influences associated with it. If you happened to be in your late teens in the late 60’s, then this album will be very well appreciated, as it reflects everything that was occurring around the world at the moment. If you are not from that generation, it doesn’t matter at all, because it is super charged with that certain optimistic effect of “discovery.” Another words, this album never gets old! ENJOY!

About the album:

The 1998 reissue of ELECTRIC BATH contains two bonus tracks that did not appear on the original release. All tracks have been digitally remastered using 20-bit technology. Years before the advent of jazz-rock, when BITCHES BREW was just a gleam in Miles Davis’s eye, young trumpet sensation Don Ellis was combining jazz with electric, rock-identified elements in an amalgam that somehow managed to be both adventurous and popular. Listening to ELECTRIC BATH today, some of the ’60s go-go-dance beats Ellis added to his forward-looking big band compositions sound a bit dated……Read More

DonEllisBiography

Don Ellis biography:

Born. 25 July 1934, Los Angeles, California, USA, d. 17 December 1978, Hollywood, California, USA. Appreciation of Ellis’ work has increased since his death and he is now regarded by many as an important figure in jazz. From childhood he was fascinated with brass instruments and received a trumpet at the age of two. At junior high school he had his own quartet and at Boston university he was a member of the band. His first professional work was as a member of Ray McKinley’s Glenn Miller Orchestra. After his national service, Ellis formed a small group, playing coffee-houses in New York’s Greenwich Village. By the late 50s he was playing with many name bands including those of Woody Herman, Lionel Hampton, Charles Mingus and Maynard Ferguson. Ellis also worked in small groups, enjoying the greater freedom of expression this allowed. In 1961/2 he was a member of George Russell’s sextet.

In Atlantic City, Ellis took up a teaching fellowship and it was there that he developed and explored his interest in the complexities of Indian rhythm patterns. Ellis made a triumphant appearance at the 1966 Monterey Jazz festival with his 23-piece band. His completely original themes were scored using unbelievably complex notation. Customarily, most big band music was played at four beats to the bar but Ellis confidently and successfully experimented with 5-beat bars, then 9-, 11-, 14-, 17-, 19- and even 27-beat bars. Mixing metres created difficulties for his rhythm sections so he taught himself to play drums in order that he might properly instruct his drummers. He also experimented with brass instruments, introducing the four-valve flügelhorn and superbone.

During the late 60s the Don Ellis Orchestra was promoted as part of the great CBS Records progressive music campaign and he found himself performing at rock festivals and concerts. His music found favour with the Woodstock generation, who could also recognize him as an exciting pioneer. His CBS albums were all successful, his work being produced by both John Hammond and Al Kooper. Dubbed the ‘Father of the Time Revolution’ in jazz, Ellis’ music was much more than complex. It was also undeniably joyous. Tunes like the 7/4 romp ‘Pussy Wiggle Stomp’, ‘Barnum’s Revenge’ (a reworking of ‘Bill Bailey’) and ‘Scratt And Fluggs’ (a passing nod to country music’s Flatt And Scruggs), are played with zesty enthusiasm, extraordinary skill and enormous good humour. Ellis’ trumpet playing was remarkable, combining dazzling…….Read More

Check Wikipedia also, right HERE

New Music Podcasts with Classic Jazz Talk on BlogTalkRadio

This was the 4th talk show on Classic Jazz Talk and it featured jazz historian and author Cary Ginell. It was an interview that almost didn’t take place. I was basically hampered without a co-host to assist in the questioning process and fill in the gaps that naturally take place when interviewing someone live. I was prepared with a list of questions but that doesn’t cut it, the interview takes unexpected turns and the interviewer has to make adjustments. It takes plenty of experience and many hours interviewing guests to master this. I have done interviews before but nothing at all close to conducting one by my lonesome self. I mentioned this to Cary ahead of time in case he would choose to cancel and he reassured me that everything would be alright, the show must go on! He could have simply told me that he wasn’t comfortable doing an interview in this manner but he instead offered his TOTAL support. Another words, he offered to be the guest and help me conduct the interview like he was a co-host also. Well thanks to Mr. Ginell and the great job of being my “wing man,” this interview was a great success. Cary has done so much for Jazz Music with all the projects he has lead and been part of. I’m so honored to have the opportunity to interview him, this experience was truly an educational one for me and you will fully understand after listening to it, enjoy!

OriginJazzLibrary

Origin Jazz Library was founded in 1960 by Bill Givens (photo at left) and Pete Whelan, two friends who had gone to boarding school together at Soleburh School in New Hope, Pennsylvania. Their idea was to reissue classic blues recordings of the 1920s and 1930s, which at that time were generally not considered to be of interest, even to those whose primary interest was roots music of that period. The first issue was “The Immortal Charlie Patton,” which was received with considerable interest by the emerging “folk revival” community.

The label soon established itself as the vanguard of a host of independent labels which helped bring about the traditional blues revival of the 1960s, and added immensely to the body of influences which helped shape rock music. In 1967, Whelan turned over his share of the company to Bill Givens, who continued to put out new releases through the late 1960s, and well into the 1970s, by which time many other labels, such as Yazoo, had reissued the bulk of the worthwhile pre-WWII blues material, so the flow of new OJL issues slowed to a trickle. By the mid-90s, despite most of the tracks Bill issued being available…..Learn More

Shop for restored Classic Jazz albums here

All books by Cary Ginell are located here

KeepSwinginCover

This album was recorded in 1960 and is jazz trombonist Julian Priester’s debut album as a leader. It is a straight mellow hard bop album with a plenty of character. There aren’t many long solos and that explains why the whole album is only 36 minutes long. But by no means, does it reflect to be a short lived recording. “Keep Swingin‘” is straight to the point but with plenty of feeling behind it and with great cast supporting him, as you will read in the short description below. Julian Priester was a real master and has an incredible resume, you can will find that below in his biography. Finally, there’s an interesting profile article below also, concerning his retirement from Cornish College, where he taught music, learn more, enjoy!

About the album:

Trombonist Julian Priester sounds very much under the influence of J.J. Johnson during his debut as a leader, a Riverside date reissued on CD in the Original Jazz Classics series. The repertoire is comprised of four Priester originals, one apiece by Jimmy Heath (whose tenor makes the group a quintet on five of the eight songs) and baritonist Charles Davis, and two standards.…..Read More

JulianPriesterProfile

Photo of Julian Priester by Daniel Sheehan

Great profile article by Steve Griggs (Earshot.org):

Outside room 209, on the second floor of Kerry Hall at Cornish College, flattened cardboard boxes and a hand cart lean against the wall. They await Julian Priester, professor of trombone and jazz history. He retired on May 14 this year with an honorary doctorate of fine arts after thirty-two years of service. With the help of a student, the boxes will transport Priester’s teaching materials from his studio back to his south Seattle home.

Inside the studio, nine boxes full of scores, books, recordings, and trombone mutes clump in the far corner. Sun filters through two tall south facing windows that gaze over the corner of Roy and Boylston streets. Cracked and chipped white paint ornament the stark walls, high ceiling, and radiator. A crisp black Kawai baby grand piano rests atop utilitarian grey industrial carpet.

Silence hangs in the air. On a small chalk board, neatly written scales and rhythms hint at the sounds that filled this studio. Here, and in nearby rehearsal rooms, Priester shared his skills, stories, and studies. A quiet end to this chapter in his career belies the length of experience, depth of artistry, and breadth of creativity Priester carries forward into every situation.

Humility gained from Captain Walter Dyett at Chicago’s DuSable High School, the pit orchestra of New York’s Schubert Theater, and work as an on-call studio musician sets a positive model for students. Practical experience gleaned from Priester’s world travels with Sun Ra, Lionel Hampton, Dinah Washington, Max Roach, Thad Jones, Art Blakey, Duke Ellington, Herbie Hancock, and Dave Holland adds depth to his lessons. Recordings of his compositions by Ray Charles, Maria Muldaur, Patrice Rushen, Abbey Lincoln, Eddie Henderson, Philly Joe Jones, Sam Rivers, Reggie Workman, Stanley Turrentine, Bobby Timmons, Clifford Jordan, and Lee Morgan testify to the significance of studying his written music. An extensive discography……Read More

JulianPriesterProfile

Julian Priester’s biography (AllMusic.com):

Julian Priester was a versatile and highly advanced trombonist capable of playing hard bop, post-bop, R&B, fusion, or full-on avant-garde jazz; however, he remains under-appreciated due to the paucity of sessions he recorded under his own name. Priester was born in Chicago on June 29, 1935, and started out on the city’s thriving blues and R&B scene, playing with artists like Muddy Waters, Dinah Washington, and Bo Diddley; he also worked with Sun Ra’s early progressive big band outfits during the mid-’50s. In 1958, Priester moved to New York and joined Max Roach’s band, appearing on classics like Freedom Now Suite. In 1960, Priester also recorded two hard bop sessions as a leader, Keep Swingin’ and Spiritsville. After leaving Roach in 1961, Priester appeared often as a sideman on Blue Note dates, recording with the likes of……Learn More

QuietAsItsKeptCover

Here’s a great 1959 recording of Max Roach with the Turrentine brothers and as mentioned below in the description, without a piano player to be found. Very interesting approach and in a time where there were so many great jazz pianist available to fill in. Nevertheless, it worked just great as Julian Priester (Trombone) and Bob Boswell (Bass) made up for the missing intricate sounds. Max Roach was in the middle of a tremendous album recording streak at the time, with 9 recordings in 1958, 5 including this one in 1959 and 3 more in 1960. One must note, these recordings are as a band leader, he participated and was part of several other recordings in this three year period, incredible! Max was a very hard working passionate man and never failed to deliver! “Quiet As It’s Kept” is a highly innovative album with quite a bit of “coolness” behind it. I real gem that everyone should own, great stuff!!

About the album:

This is an interesting 1959 date with Max Roach leading a piano-less quintet. The airy voicings for the horns, which include the Turrentine brothers (Tommy on trumpet and Stanley, of course, on tenor saxophone) and Julian Priester on trombone, approach a West Coast cool jazz-like texture, the kind of jazz abstractions which have worn very well over the years.….Read More

PatternsOfJazzCover

Cecil Payne is outstanding here in this straight forward early hard bop recording. He leads throughout and gives Kenny Dorham long breaks as he joins in occasionally with sweet little solos. Tommy Potter plays a loud sounding bass as Art Taylor follows along with short low quick spurts of his own. Duke Jordan is generally on the background end but successfully helps the music flow in a graceful manner. “Patterns of Jazz” is a great album to sit back and relax, not to mention, its a collectible!

About the album:

This 1956 set partners baritone saxophonist Cecil Payne with the superb rhythm section of pianist Duke Jordan, drummer Art Taylor, and bassist Tommy Potter. Their performances of originals, standards, and a pair of Randy Weston compositions are unpretentious bop artistry of a high caliber. Jordan and Potter played together in Charlie Parker’s quintet of the late ’40s and are well-equipped to meet the demands of bebop. The pianist’s economical, swinging style falls somewhere between Count Basie’s and Thelonious Monk’s. Like them, Jordan is supremely skilled at saying a lot with a little. His open approach leaves plenty of space for the unassuming virtuosity of Potter and Taylor….. Read more

CecilPayneImageBio

Cecil Payne Biography (Wikipedia):

Acclaimed by peers and critics among the finest baritone saxophonists of the bebop era, Cecil Payne remains best remembered for his three-year stint with Dizzy Gillespie’s seminal postwar big band. Born in Brooklyn, NY, on December 14, 1922, Payne began playing saxophone at age 13, gravitating to the instrument after hearing Lester Young’s work on Count Basie’s “Honeysuckle Rose.” Young’s supple, lilting tone remained a profound influence throughout Payne’s career. After learning to play under the tutelage of local altoist Pete Brown, Payne gigged in a series of local groups before receiving his draft papers in 1942. He spent the four years playing with a U.S. Army band, and upon returning to civilian life made his recorded debut for Savoy in support of J.J. Johnson. During a brief stint with Roy Eldridge, Payne put down his alto and first adopted the baritone. Later that year he joined the Gillespie orchestra, earning renown for his unusually graceful approach to a historically unwieldy instrument. Payne appears on most of Gillespie’s key recordings from this period, including “Cubano-Be/Cubano-Bop,” and solos on cuts like “Ow!” and “Stay on It,” but despite near-universal respect among the jazz cognoscenti, he remained a little-known and even neglected figure throughout his career.

After exiting the Gillespie ranks in 1949, Payne headlined a session for Decca backed by pianist Duke Jordan and trumpeter Kenny Dorham. Following tenures with Tadd Dameron and Coleman Hawkins, in 1952 Payne launched a two-year stint with Illinois Jacquet, and in 1956, he toured Sweden alongside childhood friend Randy Weston. That same year, Payne also headlined the Savoy LP Patterns of Jazz. In 1957, he and fellow baritonist Pepper Adams backed the legendary John Coltrane on Dakar…….Read More

New Music Podcasts with Classic Jazz Talk on BlogTalkRadio

Alan (Giants of Jazz Radio) and Jose (Jazz Con Class Radio) are very honored to have with us jazz historian, jazz journalist and author Scott Yanow. We will cover his biography in detail and then concentrate on “West Coast Jazz.” We will decipher this sub-genre of “Cool Jazz” by discussing its roots and its history. We will also touch on the 60’s Jazz scene in both the Los Angeles and San Francisco areas. Join us, listen and/or call in!

ScottYanowInterviewBlogtalkradio

Scott Yanow (Bio):

…..Jazz Journalist and historian. Since then, I have been involved in many projects. Being the Senior Editor for the 3rd edition of the All Music Guide For Jazz resulted in a countless number of my CD reviews and biographies being utilized throughout the internet including Pandora Radio. In addition to having written ten books so far (most recently The Jazz Singers) and writing for the Jazz Heritage Club, I have written several episodes for the popular jazz radio series Jim Cullum’s Riverwalk – Live At The Landing.

I have written over 750 liner notes, hundreds of press biographies and press releases, and it has been said that I have reviewed more jazz recordings than anyone in history.  I have contributed to virtually all of the major jazz magazines including Downbeat, Jazz Times, Jazziz, Cadence, Coda, The Mississippi Rag, Jazz Forum, Jazz News, The Jazz Report, Planet Jazz, Jazz Now and Jazz
Improv. These days I write regularly for Jazz Inside, Downbeat, Jazziz, Los Angeles Jazz Scene and The Jazz Rag…..Learn More

OnTheTrailCover

Jimmy Heath is not spoken of and even compared to the artists of his time. He was overlooked and this album shows it as he was a great part of the great 60’s jazz  movement that only helped solidify its presence and its importance to society. Jazz was more inventive and more responsive to reflect the hardships the country was going through. This album “On the trail” was recorded in 1964 and once again as most albums in those days, was supported by an all-star band. There’s Wynton Kelly on piano, Kenny Burrell on guitar, Paul Chambers on bass and brother Albert on drums. Outstanding albumthat every jazz fan should own.

About the album:

Digitally remastered by Phil De Lancie (1994, Fantasy Studios, Berkeley, California). Unlike some of his other Riverside recordings, the accent on this Jimmy Heath CD reissue is very much on his tenor playing (rather than his arrangements). Heath is in excellent form with a quintet that also includes pianist Wynton Kelly, guitarist Kenny Burrell, bassist Paul Chambers, and drummer Albert “Tootie” Heath. …..Read More

JimmyHeathBioImage

Jimmy Heath biography:

Jimmy Heath has long been recognized as a brilliant instrumentalist and a magnificent composer and arranger.  Jimmy is the middle brother of the legendary Heath Brothers (Percy Heath/bass and Tootie Heath/drums), and is the father of Mtume.   He has performed with nearly all the jazz greats of the last 50 years, from Howard McGhee, Dizzy Gillespie, and Miles Davis to Wynton Marsalis.  In 1948 at the age of 21, he performed in the First International Jazz Festival in Paris with McGhee, sharing the stage with Coleman Hawkins, Slam Stewart, and Erroll Garner.  One of Heath’s earliest big bands (1947-1948) in Philadelphia included John Coltrane, Benny Golson, Specs Wright, Cal Massey, Johnny Coles, Ray Bryant, and Nelson Boyd.  Charlie Parker and Max Roach sat in on one occasion.

During his career, Jimmy Heath has performed on more than 100 record albums including seven with The Heath Brothers and twelve as a leader.  Jimmy has also written more than 125 compositions, many of which have become jazz standards and have been recorded by other artists including Art Farmer, Cannonball Adderley, Clark Terry, Chet Baker, Miles Davis, James Moody, Milt Jackson, Ahmad Jamal, Ray Charles, Dizzy Gillespie J.J Johnson and Dexter Gordon.  Jimmy has also composed extended works – seven suites and two string quartets – and he premiered his first symphonic work, “Three Ears,” in 1988 at Queens College (CUNY) with Maurice Peress conducting….Read More

MilesSmilesJeremyYudkinBookCover

Alan Bramwell (Giants of Jazz Radio) and I we be conducting a LIVE interviewing with Jeremy Yudkin, author of “Miles Smiles, and the Invention of Post Bop.” The co-hosts will mostly concentrate on the book but there will be much more covered with Jeremy, he is very qualified in the field of music.The listeners will have a golden opportunity to ask Jeremy specific questions about jazz and music in general. Listen in and/or call in with your questions. The official name is “Classic Jazz Talk” and the link to our main page is here. Here’s a description to this particular show:

Checkout the official show’s page here listen-in and/or call-in

More on the book:

Focusing on one of the legendary musicians in jazz, this book examines Miles Davis’s often overlooked music of the mid-1960s with a close examination of the evolution of a new style: post bop. Jeremy Yudkin traces Davis’s life and work during a period when the trumpeter was struggling with personal and musical challenges only to emerge once again as the artistic leader of his generation…..Learn More

 

TheBookCooks

There’s almost no information about this particular recording and its a crying shame! In fact, “The Book Cooks” is Booker Ervin’s debut album and most debut recordings are celebrated with much fanfare. Typical treatment and very upsetting for one of the best jazz tenor saxophonist ever. Booker Ervin had a very distinctive sound and no other great tenor in his time sounded like him. The closest to sounding like him would be Jackie McLean and he played the alto. Teaming “The Book” up with Zoot Simms surely worked, as they played off each other and spontaneously without a hitch. Tommy Turrentine, older brother of tenor saxophonist Stanley Turrentine,and another unappreciated jazz trumpeter (biography below) is outstanding in this recording also. Completing the sextet, you have Tommy Flanagan on piano, Dannie Richmond on drums and George Tucker on bass. A classic hard bop album that includes some of the best played ballads.

TommyTurrentineBio

Biography of Tommy Turrentine (Curt’s Jazz Cafe):

As a trumpet soloist Turrentine had all the qualities necessary for greatness. He had a full, warm tone throughout the range of the instrument and possessed the ability to create solos using long unbroken lines. His flair for melodic improvisation using long climaxes often contrasted sharply with the more disjointed creations of younger men who seemed anxious to brush aside convention. – Alun Morgan

He was the older brother of one of the most famous jazz musicians of the ‘60’s and ‘70’s. His kid brother recorded dozens of albums, including a few that are fondly remembered as classics. He was every bit the musician that baby brother was. Yet Stanley Turrentine is a bona fide jazz legend, while Tommy Turrentine, who recorded only one album as a leader in his entire career, is unknown to all but ardent jazz fans and the many musicians who still marvel at his gifts, both as a trumpet player and as a composer…….Read More

 

MingusSpeaksBookInterview

The Jazz Con Class Radio listeners should be very happy to know that I, along with Alan Bramwell, who also has a classic jazz radio station (Giants of Jazz Radio) will be conducting our debut show on Blogtalkradio.com. The official name is “Classic Jazz Talk” and the link to our main page is here. Here’s a description to this particular show:

MINGUS SPEAKS is a book of extended interviews which allowed the man to explain himself. He was assisted by me, the interviewer, and by a number of close associates who commented on aspects of his life, behavior and music.

We did the interviews in 1972 and 1974, five years before Mingus died. It was a contentious and wonderful period in his life and for his music….Learn More

WahooCover

Duke Pearson was quite an innovator and this recording is a great example, as mentioned below in the description, he wrote and composed all but the last song on this album. This album “Wahoo!” was recorded in 1964 and released the year after on the Blue Note label. The personnel and fellow musicians that accompany Duke Pearson in this recording is why it was awarded 5 stars by many so-called “jazz critics.” An all star cast with Donald Byrd (Trumpet), James Spaulding on alto, Joe Henderson on tenor, Bob Cranshaw on bass and Mickey Roker on drums. This album is considered by Allmusic reviewer, Stephen Thomas Erlewine, as an “advance hard bop” album, someone please tell me what that means? Its different and has its own style but cannot really be categorize as hard bop. It seems to me that some jazz recording are a sort of daring experiments that end out helping a new style to develop and to the point where it could stand on its own. I feel this album helped aid Post Bop into existence but of course, would never be possible without the hard bop style before it. The evolution of jazz and how it slowly developed on its own. Great album, get it!!

About the album:

A truly wonderful advanced hard bop date, Wahoo captures pianist Duke Pearson at his most adventurous and creative. With the exception of Donald Byrd’s closing “Fly Little Bird Fly,” Pearson wrote all of the material on this six-song album, and his compositions are clever, melodic, and unpredictable without being cloying or inaccessible. He has assembled a first-rate sextet to perform the material, enlisting trumpeter Byrd, tenor saxophonist Joe Henderson, bassist Bob Cranshaw, alto saxophonist/flautist James Spaulding, and drummer Mickey Roker. Even the subdued “Wahoo” and “ESP” search out new territory with their subtle themes and exploratory solo sections. ……Read More

DukePearsonCover

Biography of Duke Pearson:

Duke Pearson (August 17, 1932 – August 4, 1980) was an American jazz pianist and composer. All Music Guide notes him as being a “big part in shaping the Blue Note label’s hard bop direction in the 1960s as a producer.

Born Columbus Calvin Pearson, Jr. in Atlanta, Georgia, Pearson first studied brass instruments at the early age of five, but dental issues forced him to pursue another instrument and he started to learn the piano. His budding talent moved his uncle to give him the nickname Duke, a reference to jazz legend Duke Ellington. He attended Clack College while also playing trumpet in groups in the Atlanta area before joining the United States Army in the early 1950s. Pearson continued to perform with different ensembles in Georgia and Florida, including with Tab Smith and Little Willie John, before he moved to New York, New York in January of 1959. After moving to New York, Pearson gained the attention of Donald Byrd who saw Pearson performing with the the Art Farmer/Benny Golson Sextet (also known as Jazztet). Shortly afterwards, Byrd asked him to join his newly formed band, the Donald Byrd-Pepper Adams Quintet. Pearson was also the accompanist for Nancy Wilson on tour in 1961. During that same year, Pearson became ill before a Byrd-Adams show when and a newcomer named Herbie Hancock took over for him. This eventually led to Hancock taking over the position permanently……..Read More

IntroducingCover

This is Johnny Griffin’s unofficial debut album and was recorded at Rudy Van Gelder’s Hackensack studio on April 17 of the year 1956. This reissued CD album has two extra tracks that did not appear in the original vinyl version. “J.G” actually was actually recorded beforehand and earlier in the same year and was issued with the Argo label but was released in 1958. This album “Introducing” is as good and like “all” Hard Bop records from the late 50’s, its another classic. There’s not much of a description for this album but I can tell you from listening to it numerous times, it really jams! You can hear the musicians who accompany him in the recording (Wynton Kelly on piano, Curly Russell on bass and Max Roach on the drums) talking in the background, urging on Johnny Griffin who is wailing and challenging his usual bluesy spontaneous pace. Nice and straight forward Hard Bop from one of the best, “Little Giant.” Enjoy!

 

SuperTuesdayLogoPost

This “Super Tuesday jazz presentation” will go to your head as it will feature SEVEN versions of the the song “You go to my head” and will play back to back. I do this every now and then to show the versatility of jazz musicians and the uniqueness of jazz music in general. Five of these versions will be featured with pianists leading their respected bands, they are Oscar Peterson, Bill Evans, Dave Brubeck, Lenny Tristano and Bud Powell. The rest of the this ever changing playlist will feature my hand pick combination of songs that will hopefully keep you tuned in completely for the three hours. More on the “Super Tuesday Jazz Presentation” and the play times it is featured every week go here. Check the “Schedule Link” for play times of all the special playlists that are featured here on Jazz Con Class Radio, enjoy!.

css.php