Posts by: "Jose Reyes"

New Music Podcasts with Classic Jazz Talk on BlogTalkRadio

Alan (Giants of Jazz Radio) and Jose (Jazz Con Class Radio) are very honored to have with us jazz historian, jazz journalist and author Scott Yanow. We will cover his biography in detail and then concentrate on “West Coast Jazz.” We will decipher this sub-genre of “Cool Jazz” by discussing its roots and its history. We will also touch on the 60′s Jazz scene in both the Los Angeles and San Francisco areas. Join us, listen and/or call in!

ScottYanowInterviewBlogtalkradio

Scott Yanow (Bio):

…..Jazz Journalist and historian. Since then, I have been involved in many projects. Being the Senior Editor for the 3rd edition of the All Music Guide For Jazz resulted in a countless number of my CD reviews and biographies being utilized throughout the internet including Pandora Radio. In addition to having written ten books so far (most recently The Jazz Singers) and writing for the Jazz Heritage Club, I have written several episodes for the popular jazz radio series Jim Cullum’s Riverwalk – Live At The Landing.

I have written over 750 liner notes, hundreds of press biographies and press releases, and it has been said that I have reviewed more jazz recordings than anyone in history.  I have contributed to virtually all of the major jazz magazines including Downbeat, Jazz Times, Jazziz, Cadence, Coda, The Mississippi Rag, Jazz Forum, Jazz News, The Jazz Report, Planet Jazz, Jazz Now and Jazz
Improv. These days I write regularly for Jazz Inside, Downbeat, Jazziz, Los Angeles Jazz Scene and The Jazz Rag…..Learn More

OnTheTrailCover

Jimmy Heath is not spoken of and even compared to the artists of his time. He was overlooked and this album shows it as he was a great part of the great 60′s jazz  movement that only helped solidify its presence and its importance to society. Jazz was more inventive and more responsive to reflect the hardships the country was going through. This album “On the trail” was recorded in 1964 and once again as most albums in those days, was supported by an all-star band. There’s Wynton Kelly on piano, Kenny Burrell on guitar, Paul Chambers on bass and brother Albert on drums. Outstanding albumthat every jazz fan should own.

About the album:

Digitally remastered by Phil De Lancie (1994, Fantasy Studios, Berkeley, California). Unlike some of his other Riverside recordings, the accent on this Jimmy Heath CD reissue is very much on his tenor playing (rather than his arrangements). Heath is in excellent form with a quintet that also includes pianist Wynton Kelly, guitarist Kenny Burrell, bassist Paul Chambers, and drummer Albert “Tootie” Heath. …..Read More

JimmyHeathBioImage

Jimmy Heath biography:

Jimmy Heath has long been recognized as a brilliant instrumentalist and a magnificent composer and arranger.  Jimmy is the middle brother of the legendary Heath Brothers (Percy Heath/bass and Tootie Heath/drums), and is the father of Mtume.   He has performed with nearly all the jazz greats of the last 50 years, from Howard McGhee, Dizzy Gillespie, and Miles Davis to Wynton Marsalis.  In 1948 at the age of 21, he performed in the First International Jazz Festival in Paris with McGhee, sharing the stage with Coleman Hawkins, Slam Stewart, and Erroll Garner.  One of Heath’s earliest big bands (1947-1948) in Philadelphia included John Coltrane, Benny Golson, Specs Wright, Cal Massey, Johnny Coles, Ray Bryant, and Nelson Boyd.  Charlie Parker and Max Roach sat in on one occasion.

During his career, Jimmy Heath has performed on more than 100 record albums including seven with The Heath Brothers and twelve as a leader.  Jimmy has also written more than 125 compositions, many of which have become jazz standards and have been recorded by other artists including Art Farmer, Cannonball Adderley, Clark Terry, Chet Baker, Miles Davis, James Moody, Milt Jackson, Ahmad Jamal, Ray Charles, Dizzy Gillespie J.J Johnson and Dexter Gordon.  Jimmy has also composed extended works – seven suites and two string quartets – and he premiered his first symphonic work, “Three Ears,” in 1988 at Queens College (CUNY) with Maurice Peress conducting….Read More

MilesSmilesJeremyYudkinBookCover

Alan Bramwell (Giants of Jazz Radio) and I we be conducting a LIVE interviewing with Jeremy Yudkin, author of “Miles Smiles, and the Invention of Post Bop.” The co-hosts will mostly concentrate on the book but there will be much more covered with Jeremy, he is very qualified in the field of music.The listeners will have a golden opportunity to ask Jeremy specific questions about jazz and music in general. Listen in and/or call in with your questions. The official name is “Classic Jazz Talk” and the link to our main page is here. Here’s a description to this particular show:

Checkout the official show’s page here listen-in and/or call-in

More on the book:

Focusing on one of the legendary musicians in jazz, this book examines Miles Davis’s often overlooked music of the mid-1960s with a close examination of the evolution of a new style: post bop. Jeremy Yudkin traces Davis’s life and work during a period when the trumpeter was struggling with personal and musical challenges only to emerge once again as the artistic leader of his generation…..Learn More

 

TheBookCooks

There’s almost no information about this particular recording and its a crying shame! In fact, “The Book Cooks” is Booker Ervin’s debut album and most debut recordings are celebrated with much fanfare. Typical treatment and very upsetting for one of the best jazz tenor saxophonist ever. Booker Ervin had a very distinctive sound and no other great tenor in his time sounded like him. The closest to sounding like him would be Jackie McLean and he played the alto. Teaming “The Book” up with Zoot Simms surely worked, as they played off each other and spontaneously without a hitch. Tommy Turrentine, older brother of tenor saxophonist Stanley Turrentine,and another unappreciated jazz trumpeter (biography below) is outstanding in this recording also. Completing the sextet, you have Tommy Flanagan on piano, Dannie Richmond on drums and George Tucker on bass. A classic hard bop album that includes some of the best played ballads.

TommyTurrentineBio

Biography of Tommy Turrentine (Curt’s Jazz Cafe):

As a trumpet soloist Turrentine had all the qualities necessary for greatness. He had a full, warm tone throughout the range of the instrument and possessed the ability to create solos using long unbroken lines. His flair for melodic improvisation using long climaxes often contrasted sharply with the more disjointed creations of younger men who seemed anxious to brush aside convention. – Alun Morgan

He was the older brother of one of the most famous jazz musicians of the ‘60’s and ‘70’s. His kid brother recorded dozens of albums, including a few that are fondly remembered as classics. He was every bit the musician that baby brother was. Yet Stanley Turrentine is a bona fide jazz legend, while Tommy Turrentine, who recorded only one album as a leader in his entire career, is unknown to all but ardent jazz fans and the many musicians who still marvel at his gifts, both as a trumpet player and as a composer…….Read More

 

MingusSpeaksBookInterview

The Jazz Con Class Radio listeners should be very happy to know that I, along with Alan Bramwell, who also has a classic jazz radio station (Giants of Jazz Radio) will be conducting our debut show on Blogtalkradio.com. The official name is “Classic Jazz Talk” and the link to our main page is here. Here’s a description to this particular show:

MINGUS SPEAKS is a book of extended interviews which allowed the man to explain himself. He was assisted by me, the interviewer, and by a number of close associates who commented on aspects of his life, behavior and music.

We did the interviews in 1972 and 1974, five years before Mingus died. It was a contentious and wonderful period in his life and for his music….Learn More

WahooCover

Duke Pearson was quite an innovator and this recording is a great example, as mentioned below in the description, he wrote and composed all but the last song on this album. This album “Wahoo!” was recorded in 1964 and released the year after on the Blue Note label. The personnel and fellow musicians that accompany Duke Pearson in this recording is why it was awarded 5 stars by many so-called “jazz critics.” An all star cast with Donald Byrd (Trumpet), James Spaulding on alto, Joe Henderson on tenor, Bob Cranshaw on bass and Mickey Roker on drums. This album is considered by Allmusic reviewer, Stephen Thomas Erlewine, as an “advance hard bop” album, someone please tell me what that means? Its different and has its own style but cannot really be categorize as hard bop. It seems to me that some jazz recording are a sort of daring experiments that end out helping a new style to develop and to the point where it could stand on its own. I feel this album helped aid Post Bop into existence but of course, would never be possible without the hard bop style before it. The evolution of jazz and how it slowly developed on its own. Great album, get it!!

About the album:

A truly wonderful advanced hard bop date, Wahoo captures pianist Duke Pearson at his most adventurous and creative. With the exception of Donald Byrd’s closing “Fly Little Bird Fly,” Pearson wrote all of the material on this six-song album, and his compositions are clever, melodic, and unpredictable without being cloying or inaccessible. He has assembled a first-rate sextet to perform the material, enlisting trumpeter Byrd, tenor saxophonist Joe Henderson, bassist Bob Cranshaw, alto saxophonist/flautist James Spaulding, and drummer Mickey Roker. Even the subdued “Wahoo” and “ESP” search out new territory with their subtle themes and exploratory solo sections. ……Read More

DukePearsonCover

Biography of Duke Pearson:

Duke Pearson (August 17, 1932 – August 4, 1980) was an American jazz pianist and composer. All Music Guide notes him as being a “big part in shaping the Blue Note label’s hard bop direction in the 1960s as a producer.

Born Columbus Calvin Pearson, Jr. in Atlanta, Georgia, Pearson first studied brass instruments at the early age of five, but dental issues forced him to pursue another instrument and he started to learn the piano. His budding talent moved his uncle to give him the nickname Duke, a reference to jazz legend Duke Ellington. He attended Clack College while also playing trumpet in groups in the Atlanta area before joining the United States Army in the early 1950s. Pearson continued to perform with different ensembles in Georgia and Florida, including with Tab Smith and Little Willie John, before he moved to New York, New York in January of 1959. After moving to New York, Pearson gained the attention of Donald Byrd who saw Pearson performing with the the Art Farmer/Benny Golson Sextet (also known as Jazztet). Shortly afterwards, Byrd asked him to join his newly formed band, the Donald Byrd-Pepper Adams Quintet. Pearson was also the accompanist for Nancy Wilson on tour in 1961. During that same year, Pearson became ill before a Byrd-Adams show when and a newcomer named Herbie Hancock took over for him. This eventually led to Hancock taking over the position permanently……..Read More

IntroducingCover

This is Johnny Griffin’s unofficial debut album and was recorded at Rudy Van Gelder’s Hackensack studio on April 17 of the year 1956. This reissued CD album has two extra tracks that did not appear in the original vinyl version. “J.G” actually was actually recorded beforehand and earlier in the same year and was issued with the Argo label but was released in 1958. This album “Introducing” is as good and like “all” Hard Bop records from the late 50′s, its another classic. There’s not much of a description for this album but I can tell you from listening to it numerous times, it really jams! You can hear the musicians who accompany him in the recording (Wynton Kelly on piano, Curly Russell on bass and Max Roach on the drums) talking in the background, urging on Johnny Griffin who is wailing and challenging his usual bluesy spontaneous pace. Nice and straight forward Hard Bop from one of the best, “Little Giant.” Enjoy!

 

SuperTuesdayLogoPost

This “Super Tuesday jazz presentation” will go to your head as it will feature SEVEN versions of the the song “You go to my head” and will play back to back. I do this every now and then to show the versatility of jazz musicians and the uniqueness of jazz music in general. Five of these versions will be featured with pianists leading their respected bands, they are Oscar Peterson, Bill Evans, Dave Brubeck, Lenny Tristano and Bud Powell. The rest of the this ever changing playlist will feature my hand pick combination of songs that will hopefully keep you tuned in completely for the three hours. More on the “Super Tuesday Jazz Presentation” and the play times it is featured every week go here. Check the “Schedule Link” for play times of all the special playlists that are featured here on Jazz Con Class Radio, enjoy!.

SomethingNewSomethingBlueCover

Four young composer/arrangers and musicians, working and creating a classic jazz. All were innovators and key components of the modern jazz movement in the late 50′s. Here they are with the support of other greats like Phil Woods, Donald Byrd, Eddie Costa Al Cohn and more. “Something New, Something Blue” was recorded in 1959, here’s more on the main four characters of this exceptionally unique piece of work:

Teo Macero: Teo Macero (October 30, 1925 – February 19, 2008), born Attilio Joseph Macero, was an Americanjazzsaxophonist, composer, and record producer. He was a producer at Columbia Records for twenty years, and most notably produced Kind of Blue, the Miles Davis album which at No. 12 is the highest-ranked jazz album on Rolling Stone’s500 Greatest Albums of All Time, and according to the RIAA, is the best-selling jazz album of all time. Macero also produced Davis’ Bitches Brew, and…Read More

Bill Russo: A former student of the jazz pianist Lennie Tristano, Russo wrote ground-breaking orchestral scores for the Stan Kenton Orchestra in the 1950s, including 23 Degrees N 82 Degrees W, Frank Speaking, and Portrait of a Count. One of the more famous works he wrote for the Kenton Orchestra is Halls Of Brass, specially composed for the brass section, without woodwinds or percussion. The section recording this piece, featured such jazz artists as Buddy Childers, Maynard Ferguson and Milt Bernhart, was much-respected by symphony brass musicians…..Read More

Manny Albam: The son of Lithuanian immigrants, who was born in the Dominican Republic when his mother went into labour en route to the United States, Albam grew up in New York City.[2] He became interested in jazz on hearing Bix Beiderbecke and at sixteen dropped out of school to play for Dixieland trumpeter-leader Muggsy Spanier, but it was his membership in a group led by Georgie Auld that turned Albam’s career around…..Read More

Teddy Charles: Born Theodore Charles Cohen in Chicopee Falls, Massachusetts, he studied at the Juilliard School of Music as a percussionist. Later he began to record and made personal appearances as Teddy Cohen with bands[2] as a vibraphonist, writing, arranging and producing records, in 1951 changing his last name to Charles.

Charles was one of many jazz musicians who hung out at an apartment building at 821 Sixth Avenue in New York City known as the Jazz Loft rented by photographer and artist David X. Young, who in turn sublet two apartments to Hall Overton (Charles’s mentor) and Dick Cary. Known as an innovator…..Read More

About the album:

Teo Macero was the A&R who conceived the two albums on this CD. SOMETHING NEW, SOMETHING BLUE was designed to demonstrate the talents of four young composer-arrangers—Manny Albam, Teddy Charles, Bill Russo, and Macero himself—working in that still undefined area of modern music in which jazz meets the more traditional “concert” forms.

Each one was commissioned to write an original composition and a new arrangement of a blues or a blues-oriented standard, and to make both blue in feeling. The blues provides an effective bridge from the most primitive………Read More

BullsEyeCover

Here’s another great example of a “solid” Hard Bop recording that was done in the late 60′s. “Bull’s Eye” was recorded in 1968 and reflects Barry Harris’ originality and wittiness to follow and also create, with his fellow band members (read description below). There is another factor which involves my favorite jazz drummer, Billy Higgins and arguably the reason why Harris is able to achieve all his goals in this album. If one listens well to this album, they could hear Harris and Higgins playing together in harmony as they create all the mood changes together. Of course, one cannot ignore a great bass (Paul Chambers) backing them up in perfect rhythm. Also, it doesn’t hurt either to have a trio of legends on the horns, Kenny Dorham (trumpet), Pepper Adams (baritone sax) and Charles McPhearson on tenor, LOL!! A real killer, top-notch, true classic jazz recording! This really never ends, what a treasure of jazz, stemming from the mid 50′s to the late 60′s. All these outstanding jazz musicians, existing and recording together at the same time period. Enjoy!

About the album:

In the liner notes that he wrote for Bull’s Eye in 1968, Mark Gardner quotes pianist Walter Bishop as calling Barry Harris “one of the very last of the bebop purists that we have on the piano.” Bishop knew what he was talking about; back in 1968, many acoustic pianists were choosing modal post-bop or avant-garde jazz over bop — and some were taking up electric keyboards and starting to explore a fascinating new jazz-rock-funk amalgam that came to be called fusion. But Harris, who was 38 when he recorded Bull’s Eye, was still a hardcore bebopper along the lines of Bud Powell and Thelonious Monk. On this 1968 session, the Detroit native offers no acknowledgment of ’60s trends in jazz piano — he doesn’t acknowledge McCoy Tyner’s modal post-bop any more than he acknowledges Cecil Taylor’s free jazz. And that’s just as well, because Harris is great at what he does. Unlike Tyner, Taylor, Bill Evans, Chick Corea, or Andrew Hill, Harris was always a follower rather than a leader. But again, he’s great at what he does, and on Bull’s Eye, Harris excels whether he is embracing Monk’s “Off Minor” or providing original tunes that range…..Learn More

SMakeItCover

If any jazz fans were curious about the level of impact Art Blakey and his Jazz Messengers had during 1965, then they should listen to this album. “‘S Make It” which stands for “Let’s make it” was recorded in 1964 and released in 1965. The messenger band members that were with him from 1961 to 1964 (Wayne Shorter, Freddie Hubbard and Cedar Walton) had left. Art picked up some familiar musicians that worked with him in the past and added a legend tenor saxophonist and recorded this beauty. Who were they? Well, on trumpet it was Lee Morgan, on trombone it was Curtis Fuller, the Pianist was John Hicks, Victor Sproles on bass and the new addition on tenor was the one and only John Gilmore! Another classic from Blakey and with that soulful modern mid-60′s sound, sweet stuff!

About the album:

Art Blakey & the Jazz Messengers: John Gilmore (tenor saxophone); Lee Morgan (trumpet); Curtis Fuller (trombone); John Hicks (piano); Victor Sproles (bass instrument); Art Blakey (drums). Drummer and bandleader Art Blakey was a leading practitioner of hard bop, a sub-genre of bebop that emphasized the blues and hard-swinging, usually mid-tempo, grooves. This 1964 session presents classic performances by one of Blakey’s most accomplished Jazz Messengers line-ups. (The personnel changed often over the years.) Inspired solos are heard here by legends in their own right, including trumpeter Lee Morgan, trombonist Curtis Fuller, and pianist John Hicks.…….Read More

ScheduleJazzConClassRadio

The new and official “Schedule Link” is back in order to keep all the Jazz Con Class Radio listeners informed concerning the programing. It is a monthly based schedule that lists all the playlists and the times they start. It’s more of a general view of the programing but it gives me the opportunity to add special events and there will be many of them in the future. Although I will announce it beforehand, the listeners should take a look at the schedule every day in case they miss any changes. The Jazz Con Class Radio library is hugely impressive, the daily regular’s wouldn’t tune in every day if they were hearing the same songs over and over. All the jazz on this internet radio station is high quality and there are more classic/traditional jazz tunes being added everyday. The schedule link, according to the licensing agreement, cannot announce the songs names or artists names that will be playing ahead of time and that’s why it is so general. The schedule link greatly benefit those who are interested in a certain type of playlist and helps them coordinate both the Jazz Con Class radio schedule with their own. Take a look at it here.

BebopRevisitedCover

This 1964 recording was Charles McPhearson’s debut album as a leader. It was a memorable showing by this practically unknown alto saxophonist who managed to bring back bebop to life when hard bop and avant-garde was in full swing. A small reminder from McPhearson, in case somebody had forgotten the strong foundation that bebop had provided. “Bebop Revisited” is a very nostalgic type of album that serves as a rectifiable example to prove how immensely talented Charles McPhearson is. Using Bebop as the thematic approach for his debut, only helps the listener compare and easily confirm his extraordinary abilities, as he brings Charlie Parker back to life (There’s more, read biography below). Great album, get it!

About the album:

Bebop is the thing on this excellent outing as altoist Charles McPherson and pianist Barry Harris do their interpretations of Charlie Parker and Bud Powell. With trumpeter Carmell Jones, bassist Nelson Boyd and drummer Al “Tootie” Heath completing the quintet, the band romps through such bop classics as…….Read More

CharlesMcPhearsonBio

Biography of Charles McPhearson:

Charles McPherson was born in Joplin, Missouri and moved to Detroit at age nine. After growing up in Detroit, he studied with the renowned pianist Barry Harris and started playing jazz professionally at age 19. He moved from Detroit to New York in 1959 and
performed with Charles Mingus from 1960 to 1972. While performing with Mingus, he collaborated frequently with Harris, Lonnie Hillyer (trumpet), and George Coleman (tenorsax).

McPherson has performed at concerts and festivals with his own orchestra.

McPherson was recently featured at Lincoln Center showcasing his original compositions and arrangements with a seven piece ensemble. He has toured the US, Europe, Japan, Africa and South America with his own group, as well as with jazz greats Billy Eckstine, Lionel Hampton, Nat Adderly, Jay McShann and others. McPherson has recorded as guest artist with Charlie Mingus, Barry Harris, Art Farmer, Kenny Drew, Toshiko Akiyoshi, the Carnegie Hall Jazz Orchestra, and the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis. He has recorded as leader on Prestige, Fantasy, Mainstream, Discovery, Xanadu, and most recently Arabesque. His most recent recording is the highly acclaimed “Manhattan Nocturne”.

Charles was also the featured alto saxophonist in the Clint Eastwood film “Bird,” a biography about Charlie Parker.

McPherson remains a strong, viable force on the jazz scene today. He is at the height of his powers. His playing combines passionate feeling with intricate patterns of improvisation. Throughout his four decade s of being an integral performer of the music, Charles has not merely remained true to his BOP origins, but has expanded on them. Stanley Crouch says in his New York Times article on Charles. “He is a singular voice who has never sacrificed the fluidity of his melody making, and is held in high esteem by musicians both long seasoned and young.”…..Learn More

HaroldLandInNewYorkCover

Harold Land was not known too much on the east coast, so to make his presence known he came over to New York in 1960 and recorded this album at the Plaza Sound Studio. There was no better way to express his value than to team up with the great Kenny Dorham and they made the best out of it. “Eastward Ho!” was their end product and it was a total success. Harald Land has a very distinctive sound on the tenor, a very clear and strong sound but with a soft bluesy/intimate touch to it. He could successfully matched up with the very best of them (read biography below). Great album that can rank with many other classics.

About the album:

Tenor saxophonist Harold Land and trumpeter Kenny Dorham make for a potent front line on this CD reissue, a superior hard bop set. With an obscure and quietly boppish rhythm section (pianist Amos Trice, bassist Clarence Jones, and drummer Joe Peters) giving suitable backup, Land and Dorham stretch out ……..Read More

HaroldLandBioImage

Harold Land Biography:

Harold de Vance Land (tenor saxophonist) was born on December 18, 1928 in Houston, Texas and passed away on July 27, 2001 in California.

Land was born in Houston and grew up in San Diego. He started playing the saxophone at the age of 16, and by age 21, had made his first recording as the leader of the Harold Land All-Stars for Savoy Records in 1949. In 1954 he moved to Los Angeles where trumpeter Clifford Brown spotted him, and invited him to join the Brown-Roach band.

Land toured with the Brown-Roach Band extensively, and moved to Philadelphia to live with the groups pianist Richie Powell and his brother Bud Powell, but he got homesick, and moved back to Los Angeles a year before the car crash that killed both Brown and Richie Powell. He then became a regular member of another gracefully swinging west coast band, led by bassist Curtis Counce between 1956 and 1958, and with trumpeter Shorty Rogers Giants in 1961.

In 1961-62, he regularly worked with Red Mitchell, the bassist who did much to advance the early career of Ornette Coleman, and was a successful studio musician……Learn More

 

CiaoCityNuevaMantecaLiveComboCover

I have added two very exciting jazz bands to the “Contemporary” playlist which airs on every Saturday, learn more here. Tune in and listen to the Ben van den Dungen Quartet and Nueva Manteca, along with all the other great aspiring musicians that are featured every Saturday.

More on Ben van den Dungen Quartet:

BEN VAN DEN DUNGEN QUARTET
Art Blakey once said that Jazz has to be “danceable and have the Blues” and in many ways this could be Ben van den Dungen’s musical motto for his new quartet. This quartet contains a special combination of musical personality’s.
Nothing pretentious, just swinging, right up to date and with a “happy feel”. These characteristics makes this band so undeniably 100% pure Jazz.
The new album “Ciao City” was released in 2013 and will be followed by a second one in the fall of 2014. This album will be named ‘Walkin down Blues Lane’ and will be live recorded in Cafe Central in Madrid in May 2014……Learn More

More on Nueva Manteca:

The founder of Nueva Manteca is Jan L. Hartong who started the band in 1983. In the 90′s, journalist Raul Rico of the authoritative Latin Beat Magazine, praised the group as “Europe’s finest in Latin Jazz”. Many have followed him over the years, and not without reason. The group belongs to the top of the Latin scene as can be judged from USA radio playlists which regularly show a top ranking position for Nueva Manteca’s CD’s
Nueva Manteca creates a synergy between Cuban music and Jazz music “pur sang”. The group is not “just another good latin jazz band” as there are so many these last few years, they are unique in performance, style and repertoire……Learn More

The contemporary playlist airs on8AM to 11AM, 1PM to 4PM & 8PM to 11PM- All New York Time

 

MonkStraightNoChaserCover

As mentioned below in the description, this album was in 1967 but on Vinyl only. This 1996 version of the “Straight No Chaser” has restored several songs to their original length and added THREE bonus songs never released before (“This Is My Story, This Is My Song” is better known by the title “Blessed Assurance.” It is a classic album release that will become very rare as time goes by because of its originality. All the Jazz Con Class Radio listeners and readers here should purchase this album, it is very unique and could be his best, believe it or not.

About the album:

This CD reissue of one of Thelonious Monk’s most accessible (and commercially successful) albums differs greatly from the 1967 LP. Besides previously unavailable takes of Duke Ellington’s “I Didn’t Know About You,” Monk’s own “Green Chimneys” and the rare and exquisite piano solo “This Is My Story, This Is My Song,” the CD includes previously unheard takes of three of the album’s original six tracks. The time differences in these versions are substantial: the title track is lengthened by nearly a minute, the classic “We See” by 2:47 and “Japanese Folk Song (Kojo No Tsuki)” by a whopping 5:41. (For purists, Columbia reissued the original album on vinyl in 1998.) As always, the more Monk the better, but the added material is particularly welcome in this case……Read More

EasternRebellionCover

This album was recorded in 1975 and is actually known as “Volume One” of the Eastern Rebellion recordings. There was a Volume Two which was released in 1977 has the same musicians except for Bob Berg replacing George Coleman and the addition of Curtis Fuller. This album is considered to be a Post-Bop but I categorize it as Hard Bop, this needs to be clarified for the listeners of Jazz Con Class Radio that do not know the exact definition of this added jazz genre.

Post-Bop Jazz (Definition/Explanation):

AllMusic.com: It has become increasingly difficult to categorize modern jazz. A large segment of the music does not fit into any historical style; it is not as rock-oriented as fusion or as free as avant garde. Starting with the rise of Wynton Marsalis in 1979, a whole generation of younger players chose to play an updated variety of hard bop that was also influenced by the mid-’60s’ Miles Davis Quintet and aspects of free jazz. Since this music (which often features complex chordal improvisation) has become the norm for jazz in the 1990s, the terms modern mainstream or Post-Bop are used for everything from Wallace Roney to John Scofield, and symbolize the eclectic scene as jazz enters its second century.

On Jeremy Yudkin (Via J.B Spins jazz blog) and his interpretation of Post-Bop and the “Miles Smiles” album:
Of all the various styles of jazz, “post bop” has been the slipperiest to define for my SCPS classes. I have often heard the term used in context with bop-based musicians of the late twentieth century, who have been largely inspired by the second great Miles Davis Quintet (1965-1968). Jeremy Yudkin offers a somewhat different definition of the sub-genre, but identifies Miles Davis as its originator in Miles Davis, Miles Smiles, and the Invention of Post Bop.

Yudkin in effect argues post bop is something of a hybrid between hard bop and avant-garde free jazz, identifying MilesSmiles as its inaugural recording. He sums up post bop in the following terms:

“an approach that incorporated modal and chordal harmonies, flexible form, structured choruses, melodic variation, and free improvisation. It was freedom anchored in form. We can call it post bop.” (p. 123)

I have not read this book but from the examples brought up on this blog post, concerning Mr. Yudkin’s in-depth explanation on the “Miles Smiles” album, I feel the genre Post-Bop is well represented. These are just a few excerpts from a book that totally dedicates itself on the concepts of Post-Bop jazz and acknowledges Miles Davis as being the creator of this jazz genre. I have a different opinion concerning the the post-bop genre and seemingly disagree with the the creation of this genre. I am not a musician but I have another interpretation concerning the “Mile Smiles” album and which I think many of the Jazz Con Class Radio listener will agree on. more to come…….

To return back to this album and to classify “Eastern Rebellion” as a post-Bop jazz style, would be wrong,  in my mind. I say it is border Hard Bop and Avant-Garde, very close. I will get to the bottom of this Post-Bop Jazz concept in the near future, so keep checking back. This particular album is great one, get it and enjoy!

About the album (Very general and brief, from AllMusic.com):

This CD reissue brings back a classic set featuring four giants of the modern mainstream: pianist/leader Cedar Walton, tenor-saxophonist George Coleman, bassist Sam Jones and drummer Billy Higgins. All five performances are noteworthy, particularly a definitive version of Walton’s most famous composition “Bolivia,” Coleman’s tricky “5/4 Thing” and Jones’s boppish “Bittersweet.” The veteran musicians all sound quite inspired on this advanced straightahead set. A gem.

BlueSoulCover

This is just another energetic album by Blue Mitchell to listen to that will only make you understand how talented he truly was. I am and have been appreciating it throughout, while typing this post here. It was recorded and released in 1959 and features an impressive Jimmy Heath on the tenor sax, Curtis Fuller on trombone, Wynton Kelley on piano, Sam Jones on bass and Philly Joe Jones on drums. “Blue Soul” will lift your spirits and help you cope with all sorts of difficult and/or confusing situations. This is the beauty of jazz and its unmatched power to put everything into perspective! This album is again, another classic that slipped by undetected, so don’t get fooled by the the price of the CD version (just over $5) this doesn’t reflect the quality of the music, by any means at all. For a matter of fact, you get 9 songs with each played to perfection and with a lot of soul, as the name of the album implies. Enjoy!

About the album:

Digitally remastered by Phil De Lancie (1992, Fantasy Studios, Berkeley, California). Though somewhat underrated, the late Blue Mitchell stands as one of the finest trumpeters in the 1960s and ’70s hard bop scene. His crisp, crackling, extroverted tone sparkled on the albums of Hank Mobley, Horace Silver, and even British blues avatar John Mayall. A session from 1959, BLUE SOUL finds Mitchell cooking in front of a band including bop aces Curtis Fuller, Jimmy Heath, and Philly Joe Jones, and Wynton Kelly of Miles Davis fame. The program mostly consists of……Read More

PresAndSweetsCover

This 1955 album brings together the legendary Lester “Pres” Young and Harry “Sweets” Addison. Lester Young was 45 years of age but in a physically deteriorating state, he passed away five years later at the age of 49. “Sweets” was 39 at the time and lived another 40 years after the Pres passed away. As for their ability to play, age was not a deterrent, they were absolutely great on this album, “Pres and Sweets.” They also had a great cast supporting them, with the likes of Buddy Rich (Drums), Ray Brown (Bass), Oscar Peterson (Piano) and Herb Ellis on guitar. The music throughout this recording is very soulful, very straightforward and of course, overwhelmingly bluesy. Lester Young leads throughout every song, jamming from beginning to end, in the only way that he could only do. He was so blessed with the ability of expressing his inner self and streaming all his emotions into the minds of the listeners through his tenor saxophone. There will never be another Lester Young, there’ll never be another musician with the ability to stop you completely in the middle of whatever you’re doing, important or non important and help you understand, about what life is all about! Classic album that everyone should own and listen to whenever they need a reality check.

About the album:

The two horn players perform a swinging, rousing version of The Count’s legendary “One O’Clock Jump,” which features superb solos by pianist Oscar Peterson and drummer Buddy Rich, both legends in their own right. Other highlights on PRES & SWEETS include the subtle “Pennies From Heaven” and the lovely ballad, “It’s the Talk Of the Town,” the latter of which displays Herb Ellis’ delicate guitar stylings and Pres’ beautiful light and airy tone. This 1955 session could really be termed a reunion date…..Read More

css.php