Posts by: "Jose Reyes"

CliffordBrownMaxRoachLiveBeeAndMoreHiveCovers
The Complete Live at the Bee Hive” and “More Live at Bee Hive, Chicago June 30, 1955,” are a must have if you are a dedicated Jazz collector. The Description below from FreshSounds Records is very complete and I really don’t need to add any more here but to get a hold of both recordings.

About both albums:

Live at the Bee Hive (from FreshSounds.com):

This 2-CD Set includes Brown’s first ever recording with Sonny Rollins and Max Roach recorded live at Chicago’s Bee Hive on November 7, 1955. The inimitable trio is joined here by pianists Billy Wallace or Chris Anderson and bassist George Morrow. The edition also includes an unofficial Quintet date at New York’s Basin Street Club from April 28, 1956; and a rare 10 minutes Bonus Track of Clifford Brown recorded at a hotel in Copenhagen on November 12, 1953 after a date with the Lionel Hampton band. “This astounding 135-minute release features the Brownie, Rollins and Roach group setting fire to the bandstand with their irrepressible hard bop sound. A must have for any jazz lover.” – Warren Misel, Jazz FM……Here’s the link

More Live at the Bee Hive (from FreshSounds.com):

Two disc set of rare and unreleased recordings by this legendary quintet. Disc One consists of a complete previously unissued performance by the Brown/Roach Quintet, recorded at the Bee Hive in Chicago in June of 1955. Disc Two features the remainder of that performance plus an extremely rare performance, previously only issued on LP as Pure Genius in 1982. 11 tracks total including inspired workouts of ‘After You’ve Gone’, ‘Jordu’, ‘What’s New’, ‘I’ll Remember April’ and more…..Here’s the link

JimmySmithHerbieHancockImageJazzBlueFunSpecial

This Saturday, May 23rd at 3P.M. Eastern New York Time the Jazz Con Class Radio listeners will be enjoying a Jazz Funk/Blues special that will last three hours in total and will end at 6PM. It will concentrate on Jazz music that from the mid 50’s, when the Hammond organ was introduced to Jazz and with the sole purpose of adding more Blues to the tunes. This special will also concentrate on the very beginning of what the music industry decided to name Jazz-Funk. This Jazz era began in the mid 60’s and lasted until the early 70’s and was more soulful. That’s as far in time that Jazz Con Class Radio will travel. Jazz Fusion was very exciting as well but this Jazz station is more traditional and will not play any Jazz that was recorded after the mid 70’s. There are two very important exceptions; one is if the recordings are from legendary older Jazz musicians and secondly, if they are young jazz musicians who record traditional Jazz music. Check the playlists and learn all the Jazz eras that broadcast here. Check the schedule link also to learn when these playlists play. Thank you for your attention and tune in!

If you are new here, check this link to find all the different ways to enjoy Jazz Con Class Radio.

74MilesAwayCover

74 Miles Away” is a great Cannonball Adderley album and the main reason why is because it was recorded live. All Cannonball albums are Jazz collector items but his live ones are extraordinary. Jazz musicians of this era were very talented and their best way of proving it was to evaluate them in a live setting. Its really the only way to judge a musician, of any genre, how good are they when they play live? I cannot stress it enough, this is a REAL CLASSIC!

About the album:

“Live,” whether used as an adjective or a verb, seems singularly appropriate when it is applied to Julian “Cannonball” Adderley and his Quintet. No jazz group presently active seems to come alive more buoyantly on the bandstand, and no other combo has benefited more fully from the advantages of recording live.

This latest session was a triply happy occasion for the Adderleys, since it marked a family reunion. Julian and Nat had brought their wives to Hollywood. Mr. & Mrs. Adderley Sr. were in town on a visit from Florida, visiting with their sons, and having a ball. Mr. Adderley, who used to be a cornetist, commented after one of Nat’s solos: “You sound almost as good as I used to.” During “I Remember Bird,” he said: “I remember me!” Their radiant pride was an additional incentive to the two sons, as the recording got under way before a hip and responsive crowd.

Cannonball, of course, is the orator supreme among jazz combo leaders. He neither ignores his listeners nor puts them on nor condescends to them; he addresses them as if they were new found friends. It is in this spirit that you hear the session start; after being presented to the audience by KBCA disc jockey Jay Rich, Julian introduces the opening number, “Do Do Do.”

All the way from the opening vamp by Joe Zawinul on electric piano, this Nat Adderley tune has the spirit of the blues, transmuted into 32-bar chorus form. As you might deduce from the subtitle (“What Now Is Next”), this beguilingly basic theme has been equipped with lyrics (by Gail Fisher, the prettiest songwriter in town), and will no doubt be heard as a vocal vehicle in due course, following a pattern established by Miss Fisher’s lyrics for “Mercy, Mercy, Mercy!”……Read More

EastCoastWestCoastMeet

This is an official announcement of a 10-Hour Hard Bop Jazz special. It will Start at 1P.M. and end at 11 P.M. (New York-Eastern Daylight Time). Check the Schedule Link  Here and/or learn all the different ways to enjoy Jazz Con Class Radio HERE. This special will include West Coast Jazz as well since it was part of this incredible Jazz movement. The Hard Bop Jazz Era started at about 1951 (Not Official) and evolved directly from Bebop, as it became more integrated with Gospel and Rhythm and Blues. Although Bebop had traces of this, it was very raw and very experimental. Hard Bop took it to another level and where its musicians, especially the pianist and saxophone players, became more creative/inventive. I call it the “Golden Age of Jazz” and where the best Jazz musicians existed and were at their prime, at the same time. West Coast Jazz is Hard Bop as well but began in a more European Classical/Sophisticated form and as many critics argued, lacked the Gospel, Rhythm and Blues feeling. I disagree with this evaluation and feel that west coast musicians just started a little late and slowly caught on. The East Coast Jazz musicians began collaborating with the West Coast in about 1953 when they began to travel to each others Jazz meccas, which was New York (Already striving with Jazz) and Los Angeles (In its infant stages). Let’s not forget, Charles Mingus, Dexter Gordon and many, many other greats were from the Los Angeles area. This is a very short description of Hard Bop, so if you want to learn any further, I placed a few links below so you can begin somewhere. Thank you for your attention and ENJOY!

Hard Bop Description Links (More To Come):

1. Wikipedia Description

2. JazzInAmerica.Org

TheFabulousThadJones

The 1955 album (Recorded in 1954),  named “The Fabulous Thad Jones” can be found, in its original form and also as “Thad Jones” and with four extra songs added to it.  The extra 4 songs were taken from this album, added to original and released, in 1956, as a compilation album and with a different album cover. “Thad Jones” was the name of this album, the image that shows on this was the new look. I recommend the Jazz Con Class Radio listeners to purchase this version, so you can get it all, in one (Available in MP3 version also). Great album, ENJOY!

About the album:

Jones’ playing on this 1954 release is distinct and exciting. His compelling tone and technique instinctively evoke the dense and brassy tone of predecessors such as Fats Navarro. On the Porter classic “Get out of Town,” Jones wastes no time. After a brief Harmon-muted introduction, he breaks into startlingly forceful phrases. Jones’ blistering soloing skill is even better displayed on “One More,” an uptempo barn burner that highlights his fleshy tone and his unique musical drive…..Read More

TheModernArtOfJazzCover

This 1956 album really reflects and is appropriately named “The Modern Art Of Jazz,” as Zoot Sims and company are more than qualified to represent the Hard Bop movement which began more or less 3 years before. The songs are mostly fast, with plenty of improvising taking place and of course, with great solos in between. I recommend this classic album to all Jazz fans and which in my opinion, could possibly be Zoot Sims’ best recording in a studio atmosphere with him being the leader. Either if you agree with me or not, it doesn’t really matter. There’s one thing for sure though, if you follow Zoot Sims or consider him a great inspiration, then you already have this album. Get this album people!

About the album:

These early 1956 sessions feature Zoot Sims in top form playing a pair of standards and originals by members of the quintet. Bob Brookmeyer is the perfect foil for the tenor saxophonist, as they seamless interweave intricate lines throughout the record, especially in an upbeat take of “September in the Rain.” Pianist John Williams contributed the cool “Down at the Loft” and solos brilliantly on every track. Brookmeyer penned the slinky “Our Pad” with drummer Gus Johnson, a track that would have fit a typical Gerry Mulligan date (with whom both Sims and Brookmeyer worked from time to time). Sims contributed three originals, but the hottest solos come in the closer, appropriately titled “One to Blow On.” Anchoring the……Read More

OneFootInTheGutterCover

The album description of this Dave Bailey 1960 album below, “One Foot in the Gutter,” is very well written and with sufficient detail except for its clarity concerning in which manner it was recorded. It was done“live” but not in a Jazz club as where most of these recording are done. It was a one shot deal and a 4 song, well organized jam session was the result. This is just another reason why Jazz rules, the important element that Jazz strongly possesses, Freedom of expression! This brings out the best of any musician and why these musicians were so talented. ENJOY!

Note: This was Dave Baily’s first recoding as a leader.

About the album:

Recorded on July 19 & 20, 1960. Originally released on Epic Records (17008). Includes liner notes by Dave Bailey and Dan Polletta.
Dave Bailey’s One Foot in the Gutter is the first of several dates which originally appeared on Epic in the early 1960s but has been hard to find until this CD reissue came out. The veteran drummer literally leads a blowing session in the studio without any prepared arrangements or set list, inspired by an invited audience of friends and jazz fans. The musicians include the outstanding front line of Clark Terry, Junior Cook and Curtis Fuller, along with Horace Parlan and Peck Morrison joining the leader in the rhythm section. The music is consistently loose, fresh and very inspired; egos have been checked at the door as everyone aspires to work together to produce the best results. Clark Terry’s sauntering bluesy “One Foot in the Gutter” gets….Read More

TwoFeetInTheGutterCover

Thia is another beauty that the listener here on Jazz Con Class Radio will admire! “Two Feet in the Gutter” was recorded 1961 and in the usual manner, in a studio and with no live audience (different takes). It has 5 songs; “Comin’ Home Baby,” “Two Feet in the Gutter, ” “Shiny Stockings,” “Lady Iris B” and “Coffee Walk.” Great stuff, ENJOY!

Note: This was Dave Bailey’s final recording as a leader.

About the album:

Drummer Dave Bailey’s third and final LP for Epic is a quintet session that is much like his earlier two sextet dates for the label, with an invited audience witnessing the studio recording. He has a completely new supporting cast, including two very underappreciated musicians: the tragically short-lived tenor saxophonist Frank Haynes and trumpeter Bill Hardman. Also on hand are the veteran bassist Ben Tucker and the somewhat-obscure pianist Billy Gardner. Tucker’s “Comin’ Home Baby” is probably better known for the vocal version with lyrics by singer Bob Dorough, but evidently the music came first, as this instrumental version swings hard and doesn’t have the rock flavor that Dorough’s (and other later vocal) versions have. Haynes’ big-toned tenor sax and Hardman’s muted trumpet are the highlights….Read More

SuperTuesdayMelMartinForum

This Tuesday’s Jazz presentation will be dedicated to Mel Martin and all the members of his famous saxophone forum located on Facebook. I consider myself a regular contributor and can imagine “all” the Jazz Con Class Radio listeners being part of it also. There is a high concentration of musicians that belong to Mel Martin’s Jazz Saxophone Forum and they are more than helpful to offer their valuable time to make it comfortable for all the non-musician Jazz fanatics. Their professional insights not only makes it a fun experience but also very educational one for those who are eager to learn more about Jazz. The forum happens to be public, as it should be and is very, very active! All the members follow the simple set rules just like all other forums demand from its members and everyone interacts and has fun! I look at it this way, “Don’t think you know so much, don’t assume, keep it real and by no means, don’t post any Smooth Jazz.” The best part of being part of this forum is the music that is posted there, WOW!  So, as a token to my appreciation, I have prepared and dedicated this week’s “Super Tuesday Jazz Presentation” to this magnificent forum and all of its members. The playlist that I have prepared here will play three times throughout the day so it can be heard in a global manner (From 3AM to 6AM, from 12PM to 3PM and from 8PM to 11PM (All Times are New York, Eastern Daylight Time) learn more here. There are many ways to hear the broadcast so there is no excuse. I want to personally thank Mel Martin for this forum and would like to add that this will not be the only time I will do this! Have fun and ENJOY!

PaulGonsalvesMeetsEarlHinesCover

This album was recorded in 1970 and released in 1974 on the Black Lion label. Information for this album, “Paul Gonsalves Meets Earl Hines” is not readily available but the description below gives a great insight of the musicians involved in this all-star quartet! A real classic recording that escaped the radar!

About the album:

Most of this CD was recorded at the earlier date. Duke Ellington’s longtime tenor, Paul Gonsalves, was a perfect match for the inventive pianist, Earl Hines, who (along with bassist Al Hall and drummer Jo Jones) is in top form on five standards, three by Ellington. The music swings hard and has its surprising moments. The one track from 1972 is a solo version of “Blue Sands” played by its composer Earl Hines. Although not essential…..Read More

BlackLionRecordsLogo

About Black Lion Records (Wikipedia.com):

Black Lion Records was a jazz record label based in London, England. Black Lion was founded by Alan Bates in 1968. The label had two series of releases, one for British jazz musicians and one for international musicians. It released a large amount of reissue material, including items by Art Tatum, Jay McShann, Ben Webster, Earl Hines, Bud Freeman, Bud Powell, Don Byas, Coleman Hawkins, Mal Waldron, and Duke Ellington. It had a subsidiary called Freedom Records, which concentrated on free jazz releases; this wing was bought by Arista Records in 1975.

The label was distributed by Polydor for part of its existence. It became part of the D. A. Music family in the 1980s, while Bates bought Candid Records in 1989 and shifted the focus of his activities there.

Here’s the Discography for Black Lion Records, most of their recordings were reissued albums, CD’s.

ParkerSavoyRecordImage

This article is about the term “Discography,” its importance and the enormous benefit it has on Jazz fans. A  discography is the most efficient process used to prove and give absolute credit to the particular individuals, by including the musicians, composers, arrangers and producers responsible for the creation of a musical album. That’s the end result but the process itself, is very painstaking and can take years to complete. The reason why is because decades passed before any data concerning any sound recordings was ever officially cataloged.

Here’s the dictionary definition of  the word “Discography” (Dictionary.com):

Noun, plural discographies:

1. a selective or complete list of phonograph recordings, typically of one composer, performer, or conductor.
2. the analysis, history, or classification of phonograph recordings.
3. the methods of analyzing or classifying phonograph recordings.

The best and most logical approach to learn about Jazz musicians and their contributions (records they made) is with a high quality Jazz Discography. If anyone would be interested in creating a discography of Jazz, they would have to start by learning of all the labels (Record Companies) used to physically produce the phonograph album. After obtaining the names of these companies, then they would be able to begin, in chronological order, to document a sort of database with the names of all the individuals responsible. In a discography the most important information posted and what counts the most is a detailed list of the names of the artists involved, the time and place of the recording, the title of the piece performed, release dates, type of format used (Vinyl, CD, etc.) Here are two examples to get an idea, first a Jazz discography of record label (Prestige) in chronological order (1933-1948.) In the second example you have the discography of John Coltrane only, in chronological order. These examples are from Jazzdisco.org. This website has devoted all their efforts in cataloging Jazz music. They are not completely done and are constantly adding more information from their sources, its an ongoing process but very beneficial for the Jazz fans out because it is in a computer based database. This website and several others, which I will mention at the end of this post, are very effective and very dependable but are not considered to be the indisputable “Official” and most accurate source of information. The record companies have hired certain Discography experts to catalog their records and they have documented it in books, here’s more on Discography and a great list of authors.

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Jazz fan can also go to the websites of these record companies (if they are available) and find the result of all the cataloging, here’s a look at the discography of artists that recorded for the the Verve Label. For real Jazz fans, this is a very cheap and very general manner of looking through a discography of a record label, the website is basically useless and is only trying lure the viewer to buy the music. Let’s Compare the Verve website results with the Discogs.org results. The best way for me to find Jazz recordings is to search for the artists and then find other artists through their recordings. A great way to start is to do a quick search on Wikipedia, I’ll use the great Cannonball Adderley as an example, here. There you can see the albums he recorded as a leader and the ones he was a part of it. That’s a great start but only the beginning, from their you can search through all the discographies available and find out about all the albums he recorded and search the discography of the members he played with. When it comes to Jazz, for example Bebop and Hard Bop, you will notice that most of these legendary Jazz musicians revolved from band to band and took turns leading their own bands. Believe me, you can find some incredible albums that you never heard of and by Jazz greats who are not considered household names. I personally thought I had a considerable Jazz collection but to my surprise, I wasn’t even close. Within the last three years since Jazz Con Class Radio began to broadcast, I have found hundreds of more recordings. This Jazz station concentrates only on Jazz music from the very late 40’s to the early 70’s and I would like to think that there will be a point when my search for great recordings would end but there is absolutely no ending in sight. I can’t even imagine it because Jazz musicians from these years are the greatest musicians that ever lived! Every single song they recorded is a classic! That’s great news for my listeners, they are certainly spoiled and they deserve it! ENJOY!

Here are some helpful links to search/obtain “Complete” discographies (Date of recording, all the Band Members, Record Labels used, all the releases of album and type of format used):

Search Online:

1. JazzDisco.org (Great Source, recommendable!)

2. Discogs.com (Great Source, recommendable!)

3. Lordisco.com (Must pay $9.99/Monthly for full access to the database. (Great Source, recommendable)

4. J-Disc: (Great Discography, recomendable!)

5. Attictoys.com (Discography list of Hard Bop Musicians, information concerning the subject of Discography itself and much more recommendable!)

6. Names & Numbers: (Great Information on Book and CD-ROM Publications on Discographies, You can  order from there also, recommendable!)

6Wikipedia Search (Jazz Record Labels A to Z, recommendable!)

7. BRIAN (Free Software/Application to create your own Discography, recommendable!)

Search for Books:

1. Michel Ruppli on Amazon.

2. Tom Lord on Amazon.

3. Charles Delaunay on Amazon.

4. Brian Rust on Amazon.

5. Jorgen Grunnet Jepsen on Amazon.

6. Walter Bruyninckx on Amazon.

7. Erik Raben on Amazon.

8. Bruce Epperson on Amazon.

Note: I will add more links in the future, if necessary.

EvolutionCover

The Jazz musicians listed on the album cover of this album “Evolution” only relate two the last two songs on this album and was recorded in Los Angeles, California on August 31, 1953. The songs are “Free” and the title track, “Evolution.” Teddy Charles then moved across the country and recorded the other 6 songs in Van Gelder Studio, Hackensack, N.J. on January 6, 1955. Here he was joined by J.R. Monterose (Tenor), Charles Mingus (Bass) and  Jerry Segal on Drums. Jimmy Giuffre (Tenor), Shorty Rodgers (Trumpet) and Shelly Manne stayed home. So in reality, it is two albums in one, why they titled cover in this manner and excluded those particular artists is a mystery to me. Either way its a great album to own, ENJOY!

About the album:

Although somewhat overlooked in the jazz history books, vibraphonist Teddy Charles was for a period an important participant in the early Third Stream movement, using aspects of classical music to revitalize West Coast-style jazz. This CD reissue features trumpeter Shorty Rogers, tenor saxophonist Jimmy Giuffre, bassist Curtis Counce and drummer Shelly Manne on a couple of advanced originals (one apiece by Giuffre and Rogers) from 1953. After moving to New York, Charles teamed up…..Read More

TeddyCharlesBioImagePost

Biography of Teddy Charles (Teddy-Charles.com):

Captain Ted Charles, owner of the Skipjack Pilgrim, is considered by many to be the most experienced owner-operator of commercial sailing charters on the east coast, sailing extensively from Martha’s Vineyard to the Caribbean. Since the mid 1960s, Capt. Ted has owned and operated commercial charter vessels from ports such as New York’s City Island and South Street Seaport, Miami and Key West, and throughout the Leeward Islands in the Caribbean. Ted was formerly the owner and Captain of the Schooner Mary E.

Aside from his distinguished maritime experience, Teddy Charles is considered to be one of the great jazz vibraphonists and composers of all time, playing with such jazz legends as Charlie Mingus, Charlie Parker and Miles Davis. As a student at Julliard in the mid 40s, he haunted New York’s jazz clubs, occasionally sitting in with the bands on vibes or piano. His break came unexpectedly one night when he was asked to sit in on piano with Coleman Hawkin’s band for the overdue Thelonious Monk. Soon after, Charles began to appear regularly with the top jazz groups of the day…..Learn More

ShellyManne234Cover

This is an outstanding 1962 album consisting of two separate recordings and  put together by great Jazz drummer Shelly Manne. “2 – 3 – 4 is very rare in that it features the legendary tenor saxophonist Coleman Hawkins in 5 of the 6 tunes, There is a 7th and 8th tune on the reissue CD version . They are joined by Hank Jones and Eddie Costa on piano, depending on the tune. George

 

About the album:

This unusual set has five selections from a date featuring the great tenor Coleman Hawkins, pianist Hank Jones, bassist George Duvivier, and drummer Shelly Manne. 2-3-4 songs Both “Take the ‘A’ Train” and “Cherokee” find the group at times playing two tempos at once (Manne sticks to double-time throughout “Cherokee”), and showing that they’d heard some of the avant-garde players. 2-3-4 album for sale The most swinging piece, “Avalon,” was previously available only on a sampler…..Read More

ColtraneJazzCover

Here’s a not so mentioned recording sessions from 1959-60 and which took place in March 26, November 24, December 2nd of 1959 and October of 1960. “Coltrane Jazz” was released in 1961, learn more about the album and the reissues here. This album is a must-have and which contains many tunes that were not duplicated and/or improvised differently on other records. A great collection of outstanding classic songs that are, may I say, “leftovers” from other albums. Now there is no excuse, that the Jazz Con Class Radio listeners/readers know about it and are sort of forced to listen to it. Great album, buy it, you have to!

About the album:

Released shortly after the groundbreaking Giant Steps, Coltrane Jazz features a number of takes from the ‘Naima’ session, with Wynton Kelly, Paul Chambers and Jimmy Cobb, as well as a track with Cedar Walton and Lex Humphries and an early outing by his newly formed quartet featuring pianist McCoy Tyner, Steve Davis and Elvin Jones. While lacking the conceptual strength of many of Coltrane’s greatest works, Coltrane Jazz captures the saxophonist during one of his interesting periods of change, and includes some memorable original tunes. Particularly worth investigating…..Read More

SoulStirrinCover

“Soul Stirrin'” is a great album from a great trombone player, Bennie Green. It was recorded in 1958 and when hundreds of legendary Jazz recordings were being produced. Unfortunately because of this, he was not mentioned as much as he should have. He produced a smooth and clear rounded sound and with no effort involved. Not to mention, he could sing as well and does on this particular album. Great album, take a good look at the recordings he made as a leader and was a major part of as a sideman here. and find out more. ENJOY!

About the album:

Soul Stirrin’ is an invigorating, exciting date from trombonist Bennie Green, showcasing his wide range of skills. His tone is alternately boisterous and reflective — the juxtaposition of the wildly swinging “We Wanna Cook” (complete with shouted vocals) and the gentle “That’s All” is startling, demonstrating that Green can vary his robust sound according to the occasion. Green’s fluid trombone is at the center stage throughout most of Soul Stirrin’, but he also steps aside to shine some light on his extraordinary support group — saxophonists Gene Ammons and Billy Root, pianist Sonny Clark, bassist Ike Isaacs and drummer Elvin Jones. Each musician plays….Read More

BennieGreenBioImage

Biography of Bennie Green (Jazz.com):

Trombonist Bennie Green kept pace with the innovations of bebop while maintaining a deep closeness to the blues and popular song. His style combines a bright, full sound with sharp articulation and clarity in the upper register, reminiscent of his idol, Trummy Young, with the bebop phrasing and chromaticism later perfected by J.J. Johnson.

As his style matured, Green strayed from his fellow beboppers in that his repertoire maintained a relative harmonic simplicity, considered by some to be closer to rhythm ‘n’ blues than the modern jazz played by many of his contemporaries in the late 1950s and early 1960s. Green was at his most effective playing medium and up-tempo pieces, where his bright sound and fluid articulation, always “in the pocket,” contributed to an infectious, hard-driving swing.

Bernard Green was born on April 16, 1923 in Chicago, to a family of musicians. His older brother Elbert had played with trumpeter Roy Eldridge in the local Chicago scene, and both attended DuSable High School, a hotspot for music education at the time. It was under the direction of his music teacher at DuSable where Bennie began to study trombone.

Green augmented what he learned in the school band by copying Trummy Young and Lawrence Brown and solos off of Jimmy Lunceford and Duke Ellington records. He later stated that in his formative years, “Trummy is one of the guys that used to impress me the most. He and Lawrence Brown and J. C. Higginbotham.”

Upon graduating from DuSable in 1941, Green made a name for himself playing locally in Chicago before Budd Freeman recommended him to fill a vacancy in the Earl Hines band in the summer of 1942. His arrival preceded that of two other important members, trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie and saxophonist Charlie Parker, by only a few months.

Sitting directly in front of Gillespie on the bandstand, Green couldn’t help but listen to the musical innovations Dizzy was working on at the time. Although he didn’t understand all of Dizzy’s new musical ideas, Green enjoyed listening to them and befriended Gillespie…Read More

HopeMeetsFosterCover

Yes, this is truly a classic album featuring the great Jazz pianist Elmo Hope and the great tenor saxophonist Frank Foster. They are joined by John Ore on bass, Art Taylor on drums and Charles Freeman Lee on trumpet for only tracks 2, 3 & 5. “Hope Meets Foster” can cost a bit, but its sure worth it! You’ll find it to be one of your favorites in no time! This is a real classic, so get it and enjoy it!

About the album:

Hope Meets Foster album for sale by Elmo Hope was released Jul 16, 2013 on the Universal Japan label. Elmo Hope Quartet/Quintet: Elmo Hope (piano); Frank Foster (tenor saxophone); Freeman Lee (trumpet); John Ore (bass); Arthur Taylor (drums). Hope Meets Foster CD music contains a single disc.
Digitally remastered by Gary Hobish (1991, Fantasy Studios, Berkeley, California).

This decent bop session features tenor-saxophonist Frank Foster and pianist Elmo Hope in a quintet with the forgotten trumpeter Freeman Lee (who is on three of the six songs), bassist John Ore and drummer Art Taylor Hope Meets Foster songs. They perform three of Hope’s originals, two by Foster and an uptempo version of “Georgia on My Mind.”….Read More

FrankFosterBiography

Frank Foster biography:

“Although jazz has been officially declared a national treasure in recent years, far too few of its representative artists ever receive sufficient acknowledgement in the mass media.  In view of this unfortunate reality, it’s quite fitting and honorable that a prestigious entity such as the National Endowment for the Arts recognizes the artistic, aesthetic and spiritual value of this home-grown music through the American Jazz Masters Fellowship. Therefore, it is with extreme happiness and gratitude that I accept the fellowship award for the year 2002.”

Although best known for his work in the Count Basie Orchestra (and as the composer of the Count Basie hit, “Shiny Stockings”), Frank Foster’s saxophone playing owed more to the bebop of Charlie Parker and Sonny Stitt than the swing of Basie.

Foster began playing clarinet at 11 years old before taking up the alto saxophone and eventually the tenor. By the time he was a senior in high school, he was leading and writing the arrangements for a 12-piece band. Foster studied at Wilberforce University in Ohio before heading to Detroit in 1949 with trumpeter Snooky Young for six weeks, becoming captivated by its burgeoning music scene. Drafted into the Army, Foster left Detroit and headed off to basic training near San Francisco, where he would jam in the evenings at Jimbo’s Bop City.

After being discharged in 1953, two life-changing events happened to Foster: he sat in with Charlie Parker at Birdland and he was asked to join Count Basie’s band, where he stayed until 1964. Foster’s fiery solos contrasted nicely with Frank Wess‘ ballad work, providing Basie with an interesting saxophone combination. Foster, already an accomplished composer by this time, learned from Basie how to simplify….Learn More

Great article on Frank Foster (Marc Meyers of JazzWax):

Frank Foster, whose pouncing tenor sax and swinging arranging style helped update Count Basie’s New Testament Band with a seemingly endless stream of blues surprises from 1953 onward, died on July 26 in Chesapeake, VA. He was 82.

In a band crowded with saxophone talent, Foster and Frank Wess anchored the reed section like a pair of library lions, roaring with a sound so confident, moody and wily that no other orchestra could duplicate its natural feel and collective phrasing.

Foster’s great skill as an arranger rested with his ability to weave a call and response technique throughout entire pieces without ever seeming dull or repetitive. In many cases, Foster’s charts would have the saxes introduce and carry the melody line, while the trombones muttered or sneezed replies and the trumpets high-fived them for good measure.

The result was a modern conversational arranging technique that emulated banter heard in black barbershops rather than the church. With Foster, this salon was always humming, with roaring horns tempered by suede-smooth reeds and the sound of Basie’s “scissors” always snipping away. Foster’s arrangements didn’t sound complex but they were deceptive, requiring precise and emotional playing that seemed to hurtle forward, even when taken at mid-tempo.

When Foster soloed, he could charge ahead, drag a note or hit a high wail while producing miraculous ideas at high speed. In some ways, his solos sounded like he was making an elaborate sandwich while standing in the aisle of a fast moving train, without losing his balance or dropping a thing.

On his arrangement, while the reeds ran their lines, other instruments uttered their own blues statements that were variations on the melody line. What’s more, his charts always could be counted on to end with a big build up and a walloping crescendo, producing an emotional thrill for the listener…..Read more

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Nica’s Tempo” is considered to be a Jazz classic album and should be found in every Jazz lovers musical library. It offers a rare compilation of three 1955 recording sessions that took place on two dates, October 15, 1955 and October 22, 1955. All the sessions were lead by Gigi Gryce on his alto sax and featured a boat load of other greats! They assembled and created beautiful masters  , read more here for more on the album concerning the combination of musicians. them so many musicians names are listed on the album cover.  The one session on October 15 was a quartet consisting of Gigi with Thelonious Monk on piano, Percy Heath on bass and Art Blakey on drums. The songs recorded on were: “Shuffle Boil,” “Brakes Sake,” “Gallop’s Gallop” and “Nica’s Tempo.” The one session on October 22 featured Gigi with Art Farmer on trumpet, Jimmy Cleveland on trombone, Gunther Schuller on french horn, Bill Barber on tuba, Danny Bank on baritone sax, Horace Silver on piano, Oscar Pettiford on bass and Kenny Clarke on drums. ENJOY!

About the album:

Originally released on Savoy (12137). Includes liner notes by Ira Gitler.
Oh…if these sessions could have only been issued in separate long forms with the bands that are included. Nica’s Tempo comprises six tracks with Gigi Gryce’s groundbreaking big band, and another four ostensibly as a member of the Thelonious Monk quartet, all from 1955. Each band showcases the estimable compositional and arranging genius of Gryce, as well as his unique sound on the alto saxophone. In this CD format, the music serves a purpose in displaying Gryce’s many talents, but ultimately leaves the listener wanting more. What the orchestra tracks offer in terms of an advanced concept paired with extraordinary musicianship is indisputably brilliant. The combination of Gryce with Monk is unparalleled in another way, the brief but fruitful joining of jazz masters that helped both of them grow, while attaining a symbiosis that Monk only reached briefly with Coleman Hawkins, Sonny Rollins, John Coltrane, and later in extensia with Charlie Rouse. Gryce is perfectly situated in his element, able to not only exploit the individualism of his bandmates, but play his slightly tart alto sax in a manner that very few have ever imagined. His shining charts emphasize lower octave tones by baritone saxes, trombones, French horns, tuba, the lone trumpet of Art Farmer, and no extra woodwinds. This larger band, averaging ten pieces, is influenced by Duke Ellington during the fully flowered ballad “In a Meditating Mood,” or traditional Irish music on the short and sweet, perfectly layered, bluesy swinger “Kerry Dance.” Dizzy Gillespie’s complex bop visage is present for the nifty, sub-toned, dynamically controlled in mezzo piano, hard surfaced and simmering “Smoke Signal,” with clever meter switchings from 4/4, 3/4, or 2/4, while Bill Barber’s tuba lurks underneath. The opener “Speculation” reflects its title, with the composer Horace Silver’s piano solo intro nicely drawn out, merging into warm simple horn charts with off-minor flourishes — a great jazz composition — especially engaging….Read More

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All about Pannonica de Koenigswarter:

In the 19th century, the English branch of the powerful and immensely rich Rothschild family built the most famous of their country houses in the Vale of Aylesbury, which is why, one misty morning in late March, I find myself at Waddesdon Manor, a picture-perfect Victorian replica of a French chateau. “I think this house will give you a sense of how the family used to live,” says Hannah Rothschild, my host. “The blinds and curtains drawn to protect the art, the panelling and drapes creating a deadening effect. These were houses that killed noise, even the noise of children.” Overflowing with servants – at Tring Park, down the road, footmen were required to carry cherry trees to the table, that diners might pick their fruit straight from the branch – and run to a routine as immutable as marble, growing up in such a house was like living in a gilded cage…..Read More

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More links on Nica:

1. Wikipedia read here

2. The Jazz Baroness, read here

3. NPR.org, read here

4. Book: The Baroness: The Search for Nica, the Rebellious Rothschild

5. Book : Nica’s Dream

Great film on on Nica (Portuguese subtitles):

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As the title suggests, this is a very bluesy album and a great example of how down and dirty Jackie McLean can get. McLean’s “bitter-sweet”, “piercing”, or “searing”, a slightly sharp pitch sound makes him very bluesy but has a confusing effect on the ears of newcomers who have not heard him before. Its the sharp piercing that sort of surprises the listener at first but after a few tunes, one will understand the passion behind his playing. Great album, you need it!

About the album:

Alto saxophonist Jackie McLean was and remains one of the most distinctive of Charlie Parker’s acolytes, with a dissonant, bittersweet tone that was his alone. McLean was also among the 1950s hard boppers that favorably took to the avant-garde innovations of Ornette Coleman and Cecil Taylor. On 1961’s BLUESNIK, however, McLean is still tilling bop soil, though some small free influences were seeping in….Read More

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The cover of this 1964 Cannonball album, “Fiddler on the Roof” misrepresents its superior quality. This album can be one of Cannonball Adderley’s best. As you can read in the description below, Charles Lloyd is matched up with Cannonball either with the tenor sax or the flute. Lloyd was a big part of another classic hard-to-get album, “Cannonball Adderley Live” and a played on four songs (“Work Song”, “The Song My Lady Sings” and “Unit Seven”) on another Cannonball live album, “Radio Nights.” I’m suggesting the Jazz Con Class Radio listeners get a hold of this classic recording, enjoy!

About the album:

Personnel: Cannonball Adderley (alto saxophone); Charles Lloyd (tenor saxophone, flute); Nat Adderley (cornet); Joe Zawinul (piano); Sam Jones (bass); Louis Hayes (drums). Recorded at Capitol Studios, New York, New York and Capitol Studios, Los Angeles, California in September and October 1964. Includes liner notes by Donald Elfman. Personnel: Cannonball Adderley (alto saxophone); Charles Lloyd (flute, tenor saxophone); Nat Adderley (trumpet, cornet); Joe Zawinul (piano); Louis Hayes (drums). Liner Note Author: Donald Elfman. Recording information: Capitol studios, Los Angeles, CA (09/08/1964-10/21/1964); Capitol Studios, New York, NY (09/08/1964-10/21/1964)…..Read More

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This 1965 album, “Lucky Strikes” is probably Lucky Thompson’s most known album. A very interesting point that I would like to touch on about Lucky Thompson and have noticed many greats like him, is the under appreciation of his own talents. It seems that he, being a perfectionist, was never 100% satisfied with his playing and always questioned if he could have focused more on his performances. This strict self evaluating/critiquing is present in most great musicians and only helps them strive to greater heights. Its a thirst for more knowledge and experimentation that helps the great ones propel over the others. Its total devotion to their instrument and relentless practice that make them legends. This album is a perfect example as he perfects the art of playing both the tenor and soprano saxophones. Make sure you add this album to your library!

About the album:

Lucky Strikes album for sale by Lucky Thompson was released Jul 01, 1991 on the Original Jazz Classics label. Digitally remastered by Joe Tarantino (1987, Fantasy Studios, Berkeley California). Lucky Strikes buy CD music This CD reissue serves as a perfect introduction to the talents of the underrated saxophonist Lucky Thompson. Lucky Strikes songs Heard on four songs apiece on tenor and soprano (he was one of the first bop-oriented soprano players), Thompson plays two standards and six originals in a quartet with pianist Hank Jones, bassist Richard Davis, and drummer Connie Kay. Lucky Strikes album for sale The playing time on this straight reissue of an earlier LP is a bit brief (just over 38 minutes), but the quality is quite high. Lucky Strikes CD music Thompson’s soprano solos in particular are quite memorable……Read More

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Biography of Lucky Thompson (By Jason Ankeny-AllMusic.com):

Born in Columbia, SC, on June 16, 1924, tenor saxophonist Lucky Thompson bridged the gap between the physical dynamism of swing and the cerebral intricacies of bebop, emerging as one of his instrument’s foremost practitioners and a stylist par excellence. Eli Thompson’s lifelong nickname — the byproduct of a jersey, given him by his father, with the word “lucky” stitched across the chest — would prove bitterly inappropriate: when he was five, his mother died, and the remainder of his childhood, spent largely in Detroit, was devoted to helping raise his younger siblings. Thompson loved music, but without hope of acquiring an instrument of his own, he ran errands to earn enough money to purchase an instructional book on the saxophone, complete with fingering chart. He then carved imitation lines and keys into a broom handle, teaching himself to read music years before he ever played an actual sax. According to legend, Thompson finally received his own saxophone by accident — a delivery company mistakenly dropped one off at his home along with some furniture, and after graduating high school and working briefly as a barber, he signed on with Erskine Hawkins’ ‘Bama State Collegians, touring with the group until 1943, when he joined Lionel Hampton and settled in New York City.

Soon after his arrival in the Big Apple, Thompson was tapped to replace Ben Webster during his regular gig at the 52nd Street club the Three Deuces — Webster, Coleman Hawkins, Lester Young, and Art Tatum were all in attendance at Thompson’s debut gig, and while he deemed the performance a disaster (a notorious perfectionist, he was rarely if ever pleased with his work), he nevertheless quickly earned the respect of his peers and became a club fixture. After a stint with bassist Slam Stewart, Thompson again toured with Hampton before joining singer Billy Eckstine’s short-lived big band that included Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie, and Art Blakey — in other words, the crucible of bebop. But although he played on some of the earliest and most influential bop dates, Thompson never fit squarely within the movement’s paradigm — his playing boasted an elegance and formal power all his own, with an emotional depth rare among the tenor greats of his generation. He joined the Count Basie Orchestra in late 1944, exiting the following year while in Los Angeles and remaining there until 1946, in the interim playing on and arranging a series of dates for the Exclusive label. Thompson returned to the road when Gillespie hired him to replace Parker in their epochal…..Read More

Here’s a detailed discography of Lucky Thompson

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The Sun Ra Arkestra was an amazing band that didn’t have the same recognition as the other Jazz artists who were experimenting in the mid fifties. Some so-called Jazz fans didn’t take Sun Ra serious enough because of the interstellar approach that he and his Arkestra presented themselves. You can learn more about Sun Ra and his beliefs by doing a simple search, if you really care about his ideals. If you are open-minded and concentrate on his music, as most “True” Jazz fans do, then your focus would be more on the high quality arraignments Sun Ra produced and how he opened up more avenue to explore. This 1959 album, “Jazz in Silhouette” is a real masterpiece, get it, if you dare!

About the album:

A fascinating recording of Sun Ra and his Arkestra in an early incarnation, 1958’s JAZZ IN SILHOUETTE features Ra’s complex, adventurous compositions in traditional bop and swing contexts. The opening “Enlightenment” has edgy piano accompaniment from Ra, and a Cuban rhythm outro, but its breezy melody is reminiscent of Duke Ellington circa his Okeh period. “Blues at Midnight” is an up-tempo bop number with outstanding solos from all members of the Arkestra. Complex themes (“Saturn”) and fractured blues (“Horoscope”) show qualities integral to the style Ra would develop in the following years. In particular, the drawn-out ensemble explorations of “Ancient Aiethopia”–which are infused with tribal percussion, flute, and chant-like themes–serve as a blueprint for the artist’s signature sound. This album is an excellent, accessible introduction to the music of Sun Ra, ideal for those who may be intimidated by Ra’s more challenging later work. Now that his seminal, self-released Saturn albums are back in print, we thought we’d offer you this 1958 classic, which mixes the straight-ahead ( Enlightenment ) and spacey ( Ancient Aiethiopia ) as only the late Sun Ra could. “One of the most important jazz records since the war.” – Penguin Guide…..Read More

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Last Tuesday, I featured “Blues” Part One and where I gathered all the songs that specifically start with the word “Blues” and feature them on the “Super Tuesday Jazz Presentation.” I couldn’t fit them all into the three hours, so here you have Part Two, enjoy!

Note: (The “Super Tuesday Jazz Presentation broadcasts 3 Times every Tuesday): From 3AM to 6AM, from 12PM to 3PM and from 8PM to 11PM (All Times are New York EDT)

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