Posts by: "Jose Reyes"

PresAndSweetsCover

This 1955 album brings together the legendary Lester “Pres” Young and Harry “Sweets” Addison. Lester Young was 45 years of age but in a physically deteriorating state, he passed away five years later at the age of 49. “Sweets” was 39 at the time and lived another 40 years after the Pres passed away. As for their ability to play, age was not a deterrent, they were absolutely great on this album, “Pres and Sweets.” They also had a great cast supporting them, with the likes of Buddy Rich (Drums), Ray Brown (Bass), Oscar Peterson (Piano) and Herb Ellis on guitar. The music throughout this recording is very soulful, very straightforward and of course, overwhelmingly bluesy. Lester Young leads throughout every song, jamming from beginning to end, in the only way that he could only do. He was so blessed with the ability of expressing his inner self and streaming all his emotions into the minds of the listeners through his tenor saxophone. There will never be another Lester Young, there’ll never be another musician with the ability to stop you completely in the middle of whatever you’re doing, important or non important and help you understand, about what life is all about! Classic album that everyone should own and listen to whenever they need a reality check.

About the album:

The two horn players perform a swinging, rousing version of The Count’s legendary “One O’Clock Jump,” which features superb solos by pianist Oscar Peterson and drummer Buddy Rich, both legends in their own right. Other highlights on PRES & SWEETS include the subtle “Pennies From Heaven” and the lovely ballad, “It’s the Talk Of the Town,” the latter of which displays Herb Ellis’ delicate guitar stylings and Pres’ beautiful light and airy tone. This 1955 session could really be termed a reunion date…..Read More

EarlyArtCover

This 1954 Art Farmer recording is an excellent example of how and when Bebop began to transitioned into Hard Bop. It was about this time when the amazing new bebop sound created by Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie, Kenny Clarke, Bud Powell, Miles, Monk and several others, had begun to change in its presentation. Bebop had placed its followers in a different type of atmosphere and taken them off the dance floor. The “No Dancing Allowed” sign was prevalent in all the jazz clubs now and the focus had become solely on these talented musicians. This brought more pressure onto the concept of jazz and its ability to produce/compose significant new songs. This proved to be perfect timing as Hard Bop flourished as countless masterpieces were composed and “Modern Jazz” was born. “Early Art” is historical classic! Look at the lineup and how young these talented musicians were; both Art Farmer, his twin brother Addison Farmer (Bass) and Horace Silver were 26 years of age. Sonny Rollins was 24, Wynton Kelly 23 and drummer Herbie Lavelle was the oldest at 28.

About the album:

Digitally remastered by Phil De Lancie (1996, Fantasy Studios, Berkeley, California). Two of trumpeter Art Farmer’s earlier sessions as a leader are reissued on this CD in the OJC series. Farmer teams up with an all-star quintet (which includes tenor-saxophonist Sonny Rollins, pianist Horace Silver, bassist Percy Heath and drummer Kenny Clarke) for four songs and dominates a quartet (with pianist Wynton Kelly, bassist Addison Farmer and drummer Herbie Lovelle) on six other tunes. Farmer’s sound is lyrical even on the uptempo pieces and he is heard throughout in his early prime. Highlights include “Soft Shoe,” “I’ll Take Romance,” “Autumn Nocturne” and an uptempo “Gone with the Wind.”…..Read More

JenkinsJordanAndTimmonsCover

If you are a listener/reader that keeps up with my album posts, then you might have questioned my use of the word “classic” in my descriptions and might even have some doubts concerning the authenticity. You might even feel that I am using this word in a sort of loose manner and with no responsibility. Well, I’m not, I am being as accurate as I can be. The readers/listeners must also understand, how I evaluate and come to certain conclusion. I research and evaluate each and every album I post on, very thoroughly. Not to mention, there’s plenty of  pressure resting on my judgement here, on my album posts, and with all the rest of the music I add and broadcast publicly, on Jazz Con Class Radio. They better be as “classic” as I make them out to be! I also use the word “unknown” on my posts and they certainly are also! These albums are, for one or more reasons, are totally discarded and eventually rarely talked about. This particular 1957 album I’m posting about here, “Jenkins, Jordan and Timmons” is an another “unknown classic” and features a great “unknown” alto saxophone player named John Jenkins (biography below). A real classic, get a hold of it!

About the album:

Digitally remastered by Phil De Lancie (1994, Fantasy Studios, Berkeley, California). Four of the five selections on this CD reissue (which also includes “Tenderly”) are obscure jazz originals by altoist John Jenkins, tenor saxophonist Clifford Jordan, or trombonist Julian Priester. Inspired by both Charlie Parker and Jackie McLean, Jenkins teams up with Jordan, pianist Bobby Timmons, bassist Wilbur Ware, and drummer Dannie Richmond for some bop-oriented improvising. Strange that this would be one of only two sets led by Jenkins. Although the Blue Note CD, recorded just……Read More

JohnJenkinsWithBurell

Biography of John Jenkins:

John Jenkins is from Chicago where he was born on January 3, 1931 and has been another pupil of the famous Capt. Walter Dyett of Du Sable High. Johnny Griffin, Clifford Jordan and John Gilmore were among his schoolmates. Jenkins began on clarinet and six month later switched to alto. His baptism of fire came in 1949 at the Roosevelt College sessions promoted by Joe Segal and he continued to play at these swinging affairs during his next seven years in Chicago. He also played at local clubs like the Bee Hive. In 1955, John did a week apiece in Chicago and Cleveland with Art Farmer

when Gigi Gryce was unable to be present. In December of that same year, he fronted his own quartet at Chicago’s Bee Hive during the Christmas holidays. Concerts and sessions for Joe Segal were the main items on the agenda in 1956; musicians as Ira Sullivan and Johnny Griffin were among the participants……Read More

SecialIconT-ShirtFrontAndBack

This is the NEW design that has been added to the Jazz Con Class Radio fans and it is available NOW! The “Special Icon” T-Shirt has this image (above) on the back now. The front of the T-shirt will be the same as “The Original” check both styles here. Both are made from the same 100% Ultra Cotton material and both with the same low price!

RandyWestonLiveAtTheFiveSpot

The surprise is not Randy Weston at the live Five Spot but its the addition of the great Coleman Hawkins! What a treat, having Coleman Hawkins teaming up with Kenny Dorham! Of course you have Randy Weston leading the live session and which almost didn’t take place (Read Below). “Randy Weston Live at the Five Spot” is a great classic and again, another live album. It was recorded in 1959 and when he was collaborating with young jazz musicians until his final recording in 1967, learn more here. Get this beauty!

About the album:

The scene for Randy Weston’s Open House was the Five Spot Cafe in Manhattan. The time, a rather dreary Monday in the Fall of 1959, and the setting about as wild a scene as you will ever make. The live performance recording was scheduled for that same evening, but Coleman Hawkins was somewhere high in the skies between Chicago and New York; Roy Haynes was taking a similar route through the sky from Boston, and Wilbur Little and his bass were last heard from in Washington, D.C. Finally, Melba Liston, hospitalized in California, had air-mailed her arrangements….Read More

FiveHourSpecialLogo

Starting on Wednesday March 26 the “The Wednesday Five Hour Special” will be played twice throughout the day. Now the Jazz Con Class Radio listeners who have a 12 hour time difference and are ready to go to sleep when it airs, examples (Japan, Australia, India, South Korea and many more) are going to enjoy it the same! The new addition will have this special, starting at 1AM and ending at 6AM (New York time), the other time slot stays the same, 3PM to 8PM (New York time). Basically, this almost covers the whole planet now, all the listeners will have a chance to listen to my well thought out, tailored-made presentation and which I change every single week. Enjoy!

ExtensionsCover

This extraordinary album “Extensions” was recorded in 1970 and released in 1972. It features a continuous stimulating theme, where if one were to connect all four songs together, the outcome would have no holes at all. McCoy Tyner’s continuous piano throughout the whole album is nothing more than genius and only explains how talented he is. Of course, he composed every single song and has composed so many significant others. Gary Bartz and Wayne Shorter are students of Coltrane and it shows in this epic avant Garde album. Simply beautiful, enjoy!

About the album:

This CD has an interesting combination of players. It may be the only recording to include both pianist McCoy Tyner and his successor with the John Coltrane Quartet, Alice Coltrane (who adds atmosphere with her harp). This set also matches the young altoist Gary Bartz with Wayne Shorter (doubling on tenor and soprano), who he succeeded in Miles Davis’ group, and has reunions between Shorter and bassist Ron Carter and between Tyner and drummer Elvin Jones. The all-star sextet stretches out on lengthy….Read More

WayningMomentsCover

Wow! Absolutely one of the sweetest sounding jazz albums I’ve ever heard. “Wayning Moments” was released in 1962 and features Wayne Shorter, Freddie Hubbard, pianist Eddie Higgins, bassist Jymie Merritt and drummer Marshall Thompson. The 15 songs ( 8 unique and 7 in different takes) are played with a constant smoothness, no real high pitch out-of the-ordinary swings at all. Truly sweet, enjoy!

About the album:

WAYNING MOMENTS is Wayne Shorter’s third and final release for Vee Jay, the label where he started his solo career. At this time, it was by far his most expansive release, covering a broad range of musical ground. It also expands further on Shorter’s gifts as a composer as he inches closer to the fully mature style for which he would become legendary. It is at this time, however, that we find Shorter, still a member of Art Blakey’s Jazz Messengers, coming into his own as a prime mover of the tenor saxophone in the hard bop era. Shorter is joined by fellow Messengers Freddie Hubbard and Jymie Merritt, both in excellent…..Read More

veejayrecordlabel

About Vee Jay Records:

Vee-Jay Records. In cold, hard facts, Vee-Jay was founded in Gary, Indiana in 1953 by Vivian Carter and James C. Bracken (later that year, Mr. & Mrs. Bracken), who used their first initials for the label’s name. The first song they ever recorded made it to the top ten of the national rhythm & blues charts. In a short time, Vee-Jay was the most successful black- owned record company in the United States. By 1963, they were charting records faster than some of the major labels. They were the first U.S. company to have the Beatles. In one month alone in early 1964, they sold 2.6 million Beatles singles. Two years later, the company was bankrupt.

So much for cold, hard facts. The trouble with these facts is that they really don’t tell the story. It’s not a story of a small business that becomes a giant corporation; rather, it’s the collective stories of the people involved. I talked to several of the key Vee-Jay people during January and February, 1981. What follows is their story…….Read More

TestimonialsJazzConClassRadio

I had a gentleman from Japan who sent me an email describing how much he loved the station and how he would listen to Jazz Con Class Radio when its bedtime and bath time with his newborn baby. This is the inspiration that satisfies me the most and only encourages/empowers me to push the listening experience forward onto a higher level. This is what this station is “ALL About.” If you have a testimonial please let me know and I will publish it, just go here for the simple instructions. Thank you all for tuning in!

GiantsOfJazzPosImaget

As all the Jazz Con Class Radio listeners know very well, on Tuesday I present a 3-hour jazz presentation and play it three times throughout the day. I also give the listeners the opportunity to create their own presentation so I could feature it for the world to hear. This offer is for any individual to take advantage of but also applies to a host of another jazz station to take advantage also and that’s even if that particular station plays the same vintage classic jazz you hear on Jazz Con Class Radio. I am not in competition with anyone, we all live in a big world with plenty of internet access for all of us classic jazz broadcasters to exist. For this reason and to further enrich true jazz listeners with more knowledge, I began to search the internet for other jazz stations which offer the same high quality of classic jazz that can be heard here. Not so easy as I thought, there just aren’t as many jazz stations as I thought but then again, I still need to search more. I did run into one particular station, “Giants of Jazz Radio,” that I found to be very well organized and that plays “real” classic jazz. I was also able to contact the Owner/Broadcaster of the station, Alan and became good friends with him immediately, it seems we have many things in common although we grew up in different countries, he in Ipswich, England and I in New York. That’s the great thing about jazz, it has a connoisseur type of following and passionately preserved throughout the world. Classic jazz fans understand the “pureness” in which the Blues uniquely offers. To understand JAZZ, is to be FREE and its a great feeling that nobody can take away from us! I asked Alan if he were interested in preparing a 3-hour jazz presentation for the “Super Tuesday Jazz Presentation” and he gladly agreed. So tune in and enjoy Alan’s show today, you’re going to love it!

NOTE: The “Super Tuesday Jazz Presentation” always airs on Tuesdays, from 3AM to 6AM, from 12PM to 3PM and from 8PM to 11PM (All Times are New York EDT)

JJIncCover

This classic album was recorded on on April 1st and 3rd of 1960 but was released in 1961. It features the great trombonist J.J. Johnson with legendary jazz musicians backing him up. This is a very bluesy album with plenty of soul but advanced the same time. Interesting enough and after searching around, this could be the only time that Freddie Hubbard and Clifford Jordan worked together but I could be completely off. Anyways, “J.J. Inc” is a great classic, get your hands on it, enjoy!

About the album:

Trombonist J.J. Johnson’s 1960 sextet is featured on this Columbia CD. Most notable among the sidemen is a rather young trumpeter named Freddie Hubbard on one of his first sessions; also helping out are tenor saxophonist Clifford Jordan, pianist Cedar Walton, bassist Arthur Harper and drummer Albert “Tootie” Heath. Seven of the compositions (which are joined by Dizzy Gillespie’s “Blue ‘N’ Boogie”) are Johnson’s and, although none caught on, “Mohawk,” “In Walked Horace” and “Fatback” (which is heard in two versions) are all fairly memorable. The six songs on the original LP are joined by three others from the same dates, two of which were released slightly earlier for the first time on a Johnson Mosaic box set….Read More

JJjohnson

Biography of J.J. Johnson:

J.J. Johnson was born James Louis in Indianapolis on January 22, 1924. At the age of 9, he studied piano with a church organist and became very interested in music during his second year at Crispus Attucks High School. The only school instrument available to him at the time was a baritone saxophone. J.J. played this instrument for a very short time and, at the age of fourteen, picked up the trombone, playing in the high school band as well as the brass marching band of the YMCA.
By the time he was eighteen, J.J. left home to play with Snookum Russel’s band, of which Fats Navarro was also a member. He went on to play with other legendary jazzers Benny Carter (from ’42-5), Count Basie (from ’45-6), and Illinois Jacquet (from ’47-9). The earliest recordings of J.J. are with the Benny Carter Orchestra, although he functioned only as a section player. Johnson’s first recorded solo, only twelve measures long, was with this group on the Capitol label on the track Love for Sale…..Read More

RedsGoodGrooveCover

Red’s Good Groove” is an enjoyable album in a sort of unconventional manner. I personally feel this way about of this 1962 recording because of the absence of a tenor or alto sax. I’m not saying it a rare occurrence but unusual for that era and where the availability of so many legendary tenor and alto saxophone players existed. In that respect it was kind of unusual but not at all when picking the Blue Mitchell-Pepper Adams duo on horns, this made it very workable. Not only workable but very logical by all means, because there was a similarity with Blue Mitchell and Donald Byrd’s sound. Donald Byrd was much more experienced in  working with Pepper Adams in 7 separate recordings, they compromised themselves perfectly. The Donald Byrd-Pepper Adams was the best trumpet-baritone sax combination ever in the history of jazz but Blue Mitchell filled in perfectly! This is just another excellent example of how talented jazz musicians are and how important it is to have the freedom to improvise whenever you like. As for Pepper Adams, his greatness was in how he managed to tame the rugged sound of the baritone sax. Although he always maintained the loudness level rather high, he had the gift of placing strong emphasis on the emotional feeling it took to make a balled honestly heartfelt and the great coolness it took to make a groove tune truly “groove.” Let’s not forget the rest of the band with of course, Red Garland on the piano and another great Bass-Drums combination, Sam Jones and Philly Jo Jones. This album should have the word great in its title, instead of good, enjoy!

About the album:

Although this is a one time studio blowing session, things obviously gelled quickly for everyone as they got underway on this 1962 recording by Red Garland, which features both Blue Mitchell and Pepper Adams in prominent supporting roles. The pianist gets things off on the right foot with his relaxed blues “Red’s Good Groove,” while Mitchell, who had already recorded a number of dates as a leader himself, delivers a confident yet understated trumpet solo. Baritone saxophonist Pepper Adams contributed the oddly named “Excerent!” (a title which somewhat puzzled the original liner note writer Peter Drew but likely refers to the tendency of some Orientals to substitute the letter “r” for “l,” long before such humor would be considered politically incorrect and unlikely to appear on a CD jacket), it’s a hard bop tune that isn’t the least bit reminiscent of the Far East. The core of the date consists of several….Read More

 

BlowinSessionVol2

“Little Giant” was his nickname and he sure lived up to it! Johnny Griffin was the real thing but somehow is left out in jazzy musical conversations concerning any sort of comparison with other great tenor saxophonists. He always kept a strong loyalty to Charlie Parker as his bebop style of improvising is ever present in all his work. This album is a perfect example, as he challenges John Coltrane, Hank Mobley and Lee Morgan to a wailing contest, outstanding! This album is known as Volume 2 but is by no means, the continuation Volume 1, they are both the same session that took place on April 6, 1957. Vol. 1 was recorded and released that same year and Vol. 2 was remastered and released in 1999, with the edition of an alternate take to the forth and final song “Smoke Stack.”  “A Blowin’ Session” is another no-brainer classic recording that every jazz enthusiast should own. Oh, by the way, the other musicians in this monumental jam session are Art Blakey on the drums, Paul Chambers on the bass and Wynton Kelly on the piano! Can you beat that? Enjoy!

About the album:

Recorded at the Van Gelder Studio, Hackensack, New Jersey on April 6, 1957. Originally released on Blue Note (1559). This is part of the Blue Note Rudy Van Gelder Editions series. This early date for saxophonist Johnny Griffin is one of his best. In addition to Griffin’s renowned skill and speed on the tenor sax–which is evident throughout 1957′s A BLOWING SESSION–the personnel here comprises an almost unbelievable all-star lineup. With Art Blakey’s hard-swinging thunder on the drums, Paul Chambers holding down delicate-yet-complex bass lines, and Wynton Kelly’s bluesy touch on the piano, the rhythm section is simply unbeatable. Add to this young firebrand Lee Morgan on trumpet, and the triple saxophone threat of Griffin, Hank Mobley, and John Coltrane, and you have one of the most talented bands of the hard-bop era. These musicians existed in the same general orbit–all had played with groups led by Dizzy Gillespie, Miles Davis, or Blakey himself….Read More

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Review from Al Campbell (Allmusic.com)

A Blowin’ Session is one of the greatest hard bop jam sessions ever recorded; it is filled with infectious passion and camaraderie. It’s also the only time tenor saxophonists Johnny Griffin and John Coltrane would play together on record. Initially Coltrane wasn’t scheduled to be on this date, but Griffin saw him on his way to Rudy Van Gelder’s studio and asked him to join the remaining musicians, third tenor Hank Mobley, trumpeter Lee Morgan, pianist Wynton Kelly, bassist Paul Chambers, and drummer Art Blakey. These musicians were all associates within the same East Coast hard bop scene of the time; they came from the Jazz Messengers and Miles Davis’ quintet….Learn More

JohnnyGriffinBioIamge

Biography of Johnny Griffin:

ohnny Arnold Griffin III (saxophonist) was born on April 24, 1928 in Chicago, Illinois and passed away on July 25, 2008 in Mauprevoir, France.

Griffin studied music at DuSable High School in Chicago under Walter Dyett, starting out on clarinet before moving on to oboe and then alto sax. While still at high school at age 15, Griffin was playing with T-Bone Walker in a band led by Walker’s brother.

Alto saxophone was still his instrument of choice when he joined Lionel Hampton’s big band three days after his high school graduation, but Hampton encouraged him to take up the tenor, playing alongside Arnett Cobb. He first appeared on a Los Angeles recording with Hampton’s band in 1945 at age 17.

By mid-1947, Griffin and fellow Hampton band member Joe Morris had formed a sextet made up of local musicians, including George Freeman,where he remained for the next two years. His playing can be heard on various early Rhythm and Blues recordings for Atlantic Records. By 1951 Griffin was playing baritone saxophone in an R&B sextet led by former bandmate Arnett Cobb……Read More

KellyGreatCover

The great thing about the Hard Bop era is the endless discovery of great recordings like this album, “Kelly Great.” I found it when searching for albums in which Lee Morgan had participated in. If you are fund of a particular jazz musician and would like to find albums that are not familiar (and there are many in the Hard bop era) then you should go to wikipedia or discogs. This 1959 Wynton Kelly album is a real gem, featuring my favorite trumpet and tenor sax duel ever, Lee Morgan and Wayne Shorter, joined by Philly Joe Jones on drums and Paul Chambers on bass. Can’t beat this combination, another unknown classic, enjoy!

About the album:

Pianist Wynton Kelly teams up with trumpeter Lee Morgan, tenor saxophonist Wayne Shorter, bassist Paul Chambers and drummer Philly Joe Jones for a fine, advanced hard bop date. There are four originals (all virtually forgotten decades later) by Kelly, Shorter and Morgan…….Read More

ModeForJoeCover

Wow! This album is actually one of my personal favorites! It has that late 60′s jazz sound I love but with that hard bopish grip that wouldn’t let go so easy and respected so much. All of the musicians in this 1966 album, “Mode for Joe” are hard bop greats (names listed on very top of album cover) and true believers of tradition but were in tune with the changing new variations of jazz. And because of their great improvisational ability, they were able to put their own spin and create music that reflected the social changes going on in America. Well played jazz can have a great impact on the listener in respect to projecting a “real” emotion that can aid or reenforce ones personal opinions. This album does it for me, does it do it for you? Enjoy!

About the album:

Given the recording date of Mode for Joe and the band lineup, it’s easy to assume this is a straight-up hard bop album. However, this 1966 Joe Henderson record — featuring trumpeter Lee Morgan, trombonist Curtis Fuller, vibraphonist Bobby Hutcherson, pianist Cedar Walton, bassist Ron Carter, and drummer Joe Chambers — is a great example of modern jazz at its best. It was recorded during a time of sweeping musical changes due to developments in free jazz, soul-jazz, and even early experiments with fusion. It was a time when the bluesy and funky leanings of hard boppers were giving way to more individualized contemporary approaches. One of the best examples of this shift, Mode for Joe sounds more like……Read More

TheSixthSenseCover

Every jazz fan knows how great of a special talent trumpet player Lee Morgan was and is very aware of all his enormous achievements, considering the short career he had. He managed to record 30 albums as a leader and was mostly known for the “Sidewinder” album but one that is almost never spoken about is “The Sixth Sense” album. This 1969 album was loaded with both healthy groovy improvising and strong spiritual bluesy songs. The first 6 songs are from the original recording and the last three bonus songs were recorded prior in November 7th of 1967. Every single song can stand on its own and has its special uniqueness to it, they are all very different in in every sense. All real jazz lovers should have this album in their collection, its a must! Not to mention, this precious album has a great historical importance that can be very beneficial for qualified teachers of late 1960′s American culture since it reflects the times and mood of the country in a critical point of its history, enjoy!

About the album:

Lee Morgan wrote music that is both enjoyable and intriguing. Hits such as “The Sidewinder” and “Ceora” contain catchy melodies that bounce and sway. It’s the kind of music that stays popular through many generations. Five of his originals appear on this reissue of the trumpeter’s 1968 album; three previously unissued tracks from another recording session have been added. Born in Philadelphia July 10, 1938, Lee Morgan was surrounded by good music. By the age of 18 he was working in Dizzy Gillespie’s big band. Two separate tenures with Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers extended his jazz education and armed the trumpeter/composer with the tools he needed to create music that would have a lasting impact. Sadly, he was murdered in 1972 by a girlfriend; Morgan was only 33. Over two dozen Blue Note albums and a handful on other labels remain as a testament to the trumpeter’s creative spirit.Remastering with a 24-bit resolution gives the album’s sound an excellent quality. The first six tracks were recorded November 10, 1967 at the Van Gelder Studio in Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, while the last three come from a September 13, 1968 session. Tenor saxophonist Frank Mitchell and drummer Billy Higgins appear on both recording dates. The first session finds three horns (Morgan, McLean, Mitchell) passing the solo torch from one to another while keeping the mood cool and applying a little tension as directed by the….Read More

BennyGolsonAndThePhiladelphiansCover

Benny Golson was a monster on the tenor sax and could match up with the likes of Coltrane when it came to improvising, incredible! Now match him up with Lee Morgan, who when this album came out was 20 years of age. This album contains 10 songs but the first 6 songs are from the original recording and has the musicians listed on the album cover. The final four songs (7 to 10) are bonus tracks and from a different date and place, Paris, France on December 12, 1958. None of the musicians listed on the cover were not there accompanying Golson, it was totally a different gig (more below).  The Blue Note album cover was different, image above is from the original album (United Artists), which cannot be purchased. Enjoy this great rare album, a must have!

About the Album:

The title of this 1998 CD reissue is a little inaccurate. This set does have a six-song session with the all-Philadelphia crew of tenor saxophonist Benny Golson, trumpeter Lee Morgan, pianist Ray Bryant, bassist Percy Heath and drummer Philly Joe Jones. But there are also four numbers from a month later in which Golson and pianist Bobby Timmons are joined by a trio of Frenchmen: trumpeter Roger Guerin (who was actually the date’s leader), bassist Pierre Michelot and drummer Christian Garros. Ironically, the previous Swing LP had the equally inaccurate title of Benny Golson In Paris; the first date was actually cut in New York. In any case, the music is quite enjoyable, and the two dates match well together. Golson, Morgan and Bryant take excellent solos on three Golson tunes and one apiece by Bryant, John Lewis (“Afternoon In Paris”) and Gigi Gryce. The French session finds the band performing four numbers from the Jazz Messengers……Read More

TheYoungBloodsCover

This is a classic album featuring Donald Byrd(trumpet) and Phil Woods (Alto Sax), along with Al Haig (Piano), Teddy Kotick (Bass) and Charlie Persip (Drums). It was recorded in 1956, so that would make Byrd 24, Woods 25, Kotick 28, Persip 27 and Al Haig as the older statesman at the age of 34. Legitimate enough to be named “The Young Bloods” and great enough to be considered a classic Hard Bop album. A must have, the back cover of album offers the best description, enjoy!

About the album (Click Image below & read back cover with detail PDF):

TheYoungBloodsDescriptionSmall

CLICK Image to EXPAND (PDF)

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