Posts by: "Jose Reyes"

JazzInSilouetteCover

The Sun Ra Arkestra was an amazing band that didn’t have the same recognition as the other Jazz artists who were experimenting in the mid fifties. Some so-called Jazz fans didn’t take Sun Ra serious enough because of the interstellar approach that he and his Arkestra presented themselves. You can learn more about Sun Ra and his beliefs by doing a simple search, if you really care about his ideals. If you are open-minded and concentrate on his music, as most “True” Jazz fans do, then your focus would be more on the high quality arraignments Sun Ra produced and how he opened up more avenue to explore. This 1959 album, “Jazz in Silhouette” is a real masterpiece, get it, if you dare!

About the album:

A fascinating recording of Sun Ra and his Arkestra in an early incarnation, 1958’s JAZZ IN SILHOUETTE features Ra’s complex, adventurous compositions in traditional bop and swing contexts. The opening “Enlightenment” has edgy piano accompaniment from Ra, and a Cuban rhythm outro, but its breezy melody is reminiscent of Duke Ellington circa his Okeh period. “Blues at Midnight” is an up-tempo bop number with outstanding solos from all members of the Arkestra. Complex themes (“Saturn”) and fractured blues (“Horoscope”) show qualities integral to the style Ra would develop in the following years. In particular, the drawn-out ensemble explorations of “Ancient Aiethopia”–which are infused with tribal percussion, flute, and chant-like themes–serve as a blueprint for the artist’s signature sound. This album is an excellent, accessible introduction to the music of Sun Ra, ideal for those who may be intimidated by Ra’s more challenging later work. Now that his seminal, self-released Saturn albums are back in print, we thought we’d offer you this 1958 classic, which mixes the straight-ahead ( Enlightenment ) and spacey ( Ancient Aiethiopia ) as only the late Sun Ra could. “One of the most important jazz records since the war.” – Penguin Guide…..Read More

JazzBluesPartTwoPost

Last Tuesday, I featured “Blues” Part One and where I gathered all the songs that specifically start with the word “Blues” and feature them on the “Super Tuesday Jazz Presentation.” I couldn’t fit them all into the three hours, so here you have Part Two, enjoy!

Note: (The “Super Tuesday Jazz Presentation broadcasts 3 Times every Tuesday): From 3AM to 6AM, from 12PM to 3PM and from 8PM to 11PM (All Times are New York EDT)

PepperAdamsPlaysMingusCover

Pepper Adams was a major part of Charles Mingus recordings, so he was given permission to record an album containing all Mingus tunes. This 1963 album was a tribute Mingus and was appropriately named “Pepper Adams Plays The Compositions Of Charlie Mingus.” Adams worked with Mingus in respect to which songs would be recorded. There’s much more to learn about this album in the descriptions below. Great album, enjoy!

About the album From FreshSounds.com:

The Charlie Mingus compositions that make up this album were carefully selected over a period of months by Mingus himself, Pepper Adams and Teddy Charles as being most representative of his music.

Recorded in New York in September 1963, they constitute an outstanding cross-section of passionate, unconfined jazz that runs from the blues, through ballads, and swing tunes on to more experimental sounds. Under the leadership of baritone saxophonist Pepper Adams, who assembled a group of outstanding jazzmen, including Thad Jones, Zoot Sims, Hank Jones, Benny Powell, Paul Chambers, Bob Cranshaw and the Mingus alumni, Dannie Richmond and Charles McPherson, the playing is strong, driven by their intense and creative responses to these emotionally –and, at times, politically- charged Mingus compositions…..Learn More

PepperAdamsPlaysMingusPost

From AllMusic.com:

Pepper Adams’ Plays Charlie Mingus is a watershed album in Adams’ long career. For starters, Mingus himself had a hand in the selection of material for the dates, along with Adams and vibist Teddy Charles. Next, the two dates here, September 9 and 12, 1963, were recorded with two different bands. Most of the material was taped on the earlier date with an octet comprised of Adams, Mingus’ own drummer, Danny Richmond, bassist Paul Chambers, and Thad Jones on trumpet and his brother Hank on piano.

The latter date added Charles McPherson on alto, Zoot Sims on tenor, Bennie Powell on trombone, and had Bob Cranshaw replacing Chambers on bass. Adams’ read of “Fables of Faubus,” by the quintet with its loping, rather than careening, pace, was arranged by Thad Jones approved by the composer. Historically, it is also the first recording of the work without vocals. “Incarnation,” also by the quintet, was arranged by Adams. Hank Jones leads the band in the piece’s difficult rhythmic and harmonic structures, and he edges Adams and Thad Jones on in the front line; Pepper’s solo and fills are among the most moving and knotty of his career. Of the octet session, “Haitian Fight Song” is as furious as the composer’s, as Cranshaw’s bass drives the band inexhaustibly into the spirit of righteous indignation and rage at its heart. On “Better Git It in Your Soul,” Sims and Powell’s solos are full of gut-bucket funk and stride the R&B line with aplomb and plenty of grease. This is one of those must-own recordings for fans of Adams; but it is also for those who revere Mingus’ work, because, as radical as some of these interpretations are, they were not only sanctioned by, but delighted in by the composer.”

Thom Jurek -All Music Guide

JazzAndBlues

Jazz comes from the Blues and there’s no better indicator than Jazz tunes that start with the word “Blues.” That’s why I decided to gather all the songs that specifically start with the word “Blues” and feature them on this weeks “Super Tuesday Jazz Presentation.” This would only be “Part One” and next week I will prepare the second part and of course, without repeating any songs. I’m not 100 percent sure but from looking through the enormous Jazz Con Class Radio library, there will probably be a “Part Three.” I hope all the listeners will enjoy it and they probably will!

Note (3 Times every Tuesday): From 3AM to 6AM, from 12PM to 3PM and from 8PM to 11PM (All Times are New York EDT)

A very interesting article by Greg Tivis (GregTivis.com):

Jazz and Blues—Who Knew!

Jazz and blues are often referred to as cousins. Many believe jazz came out of the blues, or that jazz has its roots in the blues. Actually jazz and blues are like brothers, they grew up side by side.

By definition, blues is both a musical form and a music genre, while jazz is defined as a musical art form. The blues refers to both a certain type of chord progression and a genre built on this form. Jazz is much harder to define because its range is so broad, encompassing everything from late 19th century ragtime to modern fusion music.

Jazz and blues may have different definitions, but they have a lot in common. Both jazz and blues originated in the deep south around the end of the 19th century. The blues came out of the African-American communities, from their work songs, spirituals, field chants and hollers. The blues is characterized by its chord progression, the use of flattened or bent notes or “blue notes”, and its sad and melancholy lyrics.

In the beginning the blues was purely the music of the black people of the south, had several forms, and was generally played slow and sad. But by the twenties, due to the popularity of African-American blues singers like Bessie Smith, the 12 bar blues became the standard form of the blues and sub-genres like “jumpin’ blues” began to emerge. Since that time many hybrid forms of the blues have developed including rock blues and even punk blues.

Jazz came out of those same southern African-American communities at the same time, but was the result of the combining of African and European music. From the beginning jazz has always incorporated popular music of the time, and it is characterized by the use of blue notes, improvisation, syncopation, and what was coined the “swung note.” The term jazz encompasses early New Orleans Dixieland jazz, the big band music of the swing era, bebop, Latin jazz, fusion, acid jazz, funk, hip hop, and of course, the blues.

In the early part of the 20th century jazz and blues quickly spread up the Mississippi and all across the country and became the popular music of the day. Cities like Chicago, St. Louis, Kansas City, and New York City became hotbeds of jazz and blues. As these African-American creations became popular with the general population, writers began to put these previously unwritten songs down on paper.

With the invention of the phonograph, this great and original music was captured for all time and broadcast across the land through another new medium called radio. The rising popularity of jazz and blues and its subsequent off springs led us quite naturally to the big band era, and overnight hundreds of dance orchestras popped up all over the land. Thanks to jazz and blues the Golden Era of Big Band music flourished and America had found its own voice.

Today there are more musical genres in the U.S. than one can count, and many if not all have been influenced in one way or another by jazz and blues…….Learn More

HappyNewYear

I want to thank all the listeners who have been listening to Jazz Con Class Radio from the beginning and all the new listeners throughout the the three years that the station has existed. Happy New Year for those who are in 2015 already and those who are about to join them soon. Like I always say, E N J O Y ! ! ! !

GeniusOfModernMusicVol1Cover

There really isn’t too much that I can add to the two descriptions below on each of both volumes. Here we have two albums that are a piece of music history, “Genius of Modern Music Vol. 1 was recorded as early as 1947 and “Genius of Modern Music Vol. 2” was recorded in 1952. There are many songs in these albums that were not released in any other Monk album, why you ask, great question! Every true Jazz fan and/or Jazz Aficionado should have these two Monk classics in their library, enjoy!

About the album Vol. 1:

The innovations of pianist/composer Thelonious Monk are often lumped together with those of Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie, as if his work was some kind of aesthetic footnote to their bebop revolution. In fact, this great composer established a parallel stream of modern jazz that is a universe unto itself. The music on these first Blue Note sessions is so brimming with joy and cosmic architecture, it’s difficult to believe people once viewed Thelonious Sphere Monk’s work as hopelesssly oblique. Born in Rocky Mount, NC on October 10, 1917, Monk was brought up in the San Juan Hill section of Manhattan. He began playing piano at eleven, and soon went on the road with a touring revivalist. Some writers have speculated that his acerbic voicings and angular melodic lines were influenced in part by traditional blues and church music (not to mention the rickety old upright pianos he encountered along the way). However, by the time his work was first documented with electric guitarist Charlie Christian, Monk was clearly emerging from the stride tradition of pianists such as James P. Johnson. By the time tenor saxophone patriarch Coleman Hawkins……Learn More

GeniusOfModernMusicVol2Cover

About Vol. 2:

The music of pianist/composer Thelonious Monk has always inspired profound devotion amongst the hippest fans and musicians. Swing ear stars such as Coleman Hawkins and Cootie Williams were among his earliest and most vocal admirers, while Monk’s influence on Bud Powell, Miles Davis, Sonny Rollins and John Coltrane (among others) was profound. As a result, his remarkable body of written work and recordings form an aesthetic cornerstone of modern jazz. And yet, because of the challenging nature of his music, his fabled personal eccentricities, and some trumped-up criminal charges which cost him his cabaret card (essentially denying him the opportunity to perform in any New York City establishment serving liquor, between 1951 and ’57), recognition and success were a long time coming for this American original. The works contained on GENIUS OF MODERN MUSIC, VOL. 2 are some of the most remarkable performances and compositions in the history of American music, featuring some of Monk’s greatest collaborations. With its bluesy outline, classic rhythmic breaks and superb melodic contours, “Straight No Chaser” has been a jazz standard since Monk first introduced it with this recording. Art Blakey’s animated 12-bar intro sets a perfect tempo with an implied triplet feeling, as Monk’s solo proceeds directly from Al McKibbon’s sturdy two-beat pulse and the drummer’s polyrhythmic proddings. Monk’s laid-back groove belies the fierce tension his rhythmic gamesmanship, percussive dissonances, pregnant pauses, horn-like phrases and bluesy bent tones impart. All Monk tunes are full of teasing interactive themes and startling structural contrasts. As an accompanist, Monk doesn’t simply feed vibraphone soloist Milt Jackson chordal backgrounds on the jagged “Criss Cross”–he enunciates a secondary theme of orchestral gravity. And few musicians are willing or able to take on the daunting melodic and rhythmic challenges……Learn More

ATDelightCover

Art Taylor was considered as one of the elite Jazz drummer of the 50’s and 60’s. This album is a real “Classic,” right from the first track (“Syeeda’s Song Flute”) you can hear its uniqueness and as only happens when an experience drummer is in charge, as in this case with Art Taylor calling the shots. As we have seen before this 1960 recording, drummers like Art Blakey, Kenny Clarke and Max Roach added another dimension to the output. In “A.T.’s Delight” Art Taylor has Cuban percussionist Carlos “Patato” Valdes providing his feedback with the conga, he appears in three of the six songs (“Epistrophy,” “Move” and “Cookoo and Fungi.” This album is rarely spoken about and for this reason I wrote this sort of reminder to the Jazz Con Class Radio listeners/readers. Enjoy!

About the album:

Despite being a mainstay on many a Prestige and Blue Note session in the 1950s and ’60s, jazz drummer Art Taylor didn’t get much of the spotlight. That makes albums like DELIGHT all the more valuable for lovers of the hard-bop drumming style (i.e., Philly Joe Jones, Max Roach). With the soulful tenor sax of Stanley Turrentine and the clean, spare swing of pianist Wynton Kelly coloring the ride……Read More

5ByMonkBy5Cover

Here’s an album that is not spoken about enough and could be considered as one of Monk’s finest. The title of this 1959 album, “5 by Monk by 5” is a very cool shortcut for Five Songs Composed By Monk and Played by a Quintet. Thad Jones (on Cornet) made this album stand alone from the others. The addition of a song that is rarely played on any medium, “Jackie-ing,” helps separate the album further, enjoy!!

About the album:

This is a Hybrid Super Audio CD playable on Super Audio CD players and regular CD players. The title of this 1959 album nicely mirrors some of what makes Thelonious Monk so magical. He took common, simple elements and made them resonate with his personality. (Note: the original five pieces have been expanded to seven with the inclusion of two alternate takes.) Monk brought Thad Jones on board for an extra harmonic line in the compositions, as well as his spirited soloing. “Jackie-ing,” named for his niece, opens the album like a national anthem being paraded through some country where we all ought to be living at least some of the time. And then 55 minutes later it all wraps up with “Ask Me Now”–surely one of the most beautiful pieces in jazz or any idiom. Recorded at Reeves Sound Studios, New York, New York on….Read More

KennyBurrellJohnColtraneCover

This album, “Kenny Burrell & John Coltrane,” was recorded on March 7, 1958, it was originally released on the New Jazz label as NJ 8276 in 1963, then reissued in 1967 on Prestige as PRLP 7532, with a different cover and retitled “The Kenny Burrell Quintet With John Coltrane.” This album is not just about Coltrane, as he doesn’t wonder off too much on his own. This is because the album is co-lead with Burrell, they share equal play. The supporting cast is another factor, you have Tommy Flanagan on Piano, Paul Chambers on Bass and Jimmy Cobb on Drums. This is an innovative album with a lot of character, a must-have!

About the album:

Digitally remastered by Kirk Felton (1987, Fantasy Studios, Berkeley, California). During his final months with Miles Davis’ group, John Coltrane participated in a number of recording sessions for Prestige independently of Davis. This album is but one such recording. In 1958, when this recording was made, Coltrane may have been at his creative peak. During this period, his work began to transcend “bebop” and “cool,” anticipating even more modern developments in jazz-changes that would affect a whole generation of musicians. On KENNY BURRELL WITH JOHN COLTRANE, we hear the two jazz masters creating time-honored renditions of tunes such as “Why Was I Born,” a duet that highlights the musicians’ ability to not only savor each note, but to take a rather plaintive composition and develop it organically. Burrell, Coltrane, and company swing “Freight Trane” with great authority, thanks to the drumming acumen of Jimmy Cobb. On this tune, Coltrane uses a variety of sudden flourishes and lyrical lines, while Burrell comps……Read More

JimmyCobbImageBio

Jimmy Cobb biography:

Legendary jazz drummer, Jimmy Cobb, was born in Washington, D.C. on January 20, 1929. A superb, mostly self-taught musician, Jimmy is the elder statesman of all of the incredible Miles Davis bands. Jimmy’s inspirational work with Miles, John Coltrane, Cannonball Adderly and Co. spanned 1957 until 1963, and included the masterpiece “Kind of Blue”, the most popular jazz recording in history. He also played on “Sketches of Spain”, Someday My Prince will Come”, “Live at Carnegie Hall, “Live at the Blackhawk”, “Porgy and Bess”, and many, many other watermark Miles Davis recordings.

The Miles recordings and live performances are not the only high points of Jimmy’s quiet, but truly outstanding career. Jimmy did his first recording with Earl Bostic. Known from an early age as a great accompanist, Jimmy played extensively with Dinah Washington, Billie Holiday, Pearl Bailey, Clark Terry, Dizzy Gillespie, Cannonball Adderly, before joining Miles in 1957. Tony Williams took over the Miles drum chair in 1963 and Jimmy left Miles to continue to work with Miles’ rhythm section, Winton Kelly and Paul Chambers behind Wes Montgomery. In addition to several Winton Kelly Trio Albums, the three did albums with Kenny Burrell, and J.J. Johnson, among others, before disbanding in the late 60’s. Mr. Cobb then worked with Sarah Vaughn for 9 years. Jimmy then continued to freelance……Read more

NewportRebels

This album was recorded as result of a growing concern towards Jazz musicians and their exclusion from the annual Newport Jazz Festival. Charles Mingus and Max Roach felt that it was their duty to protest the 1960 annual event by way of setting up a rival concert of their own in Freebody Park which was adjacent to the main event. The festival went unrecorded but Candid producer, Nat Hentoff was able to gather many of the participants at a Studio in New York in November 1960 and re-create the event. The “Charles Mingus and the Newport Rebels” album was the result of the recording. Although its not live, it is arguably one of the greatest gathering of Jazz greats in the history of music. Look who showed up: Alto Saxophone – Eric Dolphy, Bass – Charles Mingus, John “Peck” Morrison Drums – Jo Jones, Max Roach, Piano – Kenny Dorham, Tommy Flanagan, Tenor Saxophone – Walter Benton, Trombone – Jimmy Knepper,  Julian Priester, Trumpet – Benny Bailey,  Booker Little, Roy Eldridge, Vocals – Abbey Lincoln.

About the album:

The famous Newport Jazz Festival was inaugurated in 1954 in Newport, Rhode Island. Nothing like this had been seen before in jazz. It quickly became a huge success attracting bigger and bigger crowds and with the success came problems and finally in 1960, the bubble burst. A resentment was felt towards the Festival by a significant number of jazz musicians, which resulted in the setting up a rival event.

Max Roach and Charles Mingus, both displaying great fortitude, decided to organise their own ‘Rebel Festival, adjacent to the main event in the vast Freebody Park….Learn More

1960NewportJazzProgram

Click on Image to read the whole program

Here’s a great article from Marc Myers (JazzWax Blog):

George Wein on the Rebel Festival

Most people are unaware that in 1960, Newport, R.I., hosted not one but two jazz festivals. There was the big one that had been produced by George Wein since 1954. And there was a smaller, alternative festival put on by Charles Mingus. But after the riot of July 2, 1960, the smaller concert series known as the Rebel Jazz Festival was all but forgotten in the flurry of headlines.In Burt Goldblatt’s book, Newport Jazz Festival, Lorraine Lorillard, freshly divorced from her husband by 1960 and forced off the Newport Jazz Festival board, is quoted on the origin of the Rebel Jazz Festival:

“In 1960, Nat Hentoff called me from New York and said that Charlie Mingus and Max Roach were fed up with the Festival. They said they didn’t believe in the idea of it. I went to Cliff Walk Manor and spoke to the owner, Nicholas Cannarozzi [about having an independent festival there with Mingus and Roach]. He was delighted with the idea and very cooperative. “It was a lovely setting, right beside the ocean. We were going to have this marvelous publicity. All these musicians sleeping in tents, the way it really should be, except that Charlie Mingus and Max Roach slept in the hotel. They were photographed putting their own stakes in for the tents. It was beautiful.”
“There was a lot of intrigue, and they were suspicious that I was really only crossing them and going back and forth to George [Wein]. That was ridiculous. I was suing George and the Festival [after being voted off the board]. I wasn’t about to jeopardize that.”……Learn More

JamminWithGeneAmmonsInHiFiCover

Here’s an amazing album featuring to saxophone masters together, a combination rarely recorded. We have Gene Ammons on tenor and Jackie McLean, joining together along with an top-notch supporting cast. This 1957 album consists of only four songs but they are all over 11:58 minutes long, so you can call it a “Jam Session.” “Jammin’ with Gene Ammons” is a great example of music in its highest quality! This band’s version of the classic jazz songs “Four” and “Pennies From Heaven” are very unique from the others. Outstanding album, that should be in every Jazz enthusiast’s music library.

About the album:

Digitally remastered by Phil De Lancie (1992, Fantasy Studios, Berkley, California). JAMMIN’ IN HI FI finds Gene Ammons in a context familiar to many jazz players in the 1950’s–the Prestige Records jam session, where some ace musicians, most of whom were bandleaders as well, get together and get down on some familiar tunes. State the theme in unison, and wail. “Jug”–as Ammons was affectionately known–does just that on the opener “The Twister,” generating the kind of tenor-storm that blew from the Jazz At The Philharmonic concerts. Hot on his heels are the Gillespie/Brown-style trumpet of Idrees Sulieman, the tart…..Read More

Jaki Byard was one of the best Jazz pianist ever but as rarely spoken of. He was a very intricate part of Mingus’ studio and live recordings during the 60’s. This made him a very key musician during the early Avant-Garde movement, he was in high demand and he was part of many classic albums. While all this was going on he formed his own groups and recorded great album including these two that are featured here. Here we have both the 1964 “Out Front” and the 1967 “On the Spot” albums. These two albums and any other album Jaki Byard has any association with are considered classics. To learn more about, please check his biography below his image at the bottom of this post. Enjoy!

OutFrontCover

About the album:

Digitally remastered by Phil De Lancie (1994, Fantasy Studios, Berkeley, California). Although Jaki Byard was a very eclectic pianist, this is a surprisingly conventional set. On most selections he is joined by bassist Bob Cranshaw and drummer Walter Perkins (in 1964) for fairly straight-ahead renditions of standards and obscurities. A few of the numbers add Booker Ervin on tenor and trumpeter Richard Williams, and of these by far the most original performance is the episodic “European Episode.” Rounding off the set is…..Read More

OnTheSpotCover

About the album:

Digitally remastered by Kirk Felton (1999, Fantasy Studios, Berkeley, California). This album mostly features pianist Jaki Byard (who plays alto on “A-Toodle-oo, Toodle-oo”) with a quartet comprised of trumpeter Jimmy Owens, bassist Paul Chambers and drummer Billy Higgins in 1967. With a repertoire stretching from “I Fall In Love Too Easily” and the boppish “Second Balcony Jump” to “GEB Piano Roll” and even “Alexander’s Ragtime Band,” the music serves as a perfect outlet for Jaki Byard’s eclectic talents; a highlight is the Byard-Chambers duet “P.C. Blues.” The recording is rounded off by a….Read More

JakiByardImageBio

Biography of Jaki Byard:

A musician that has spanned the generations of Jazz is Jaki Byard. Jaki Byard was born John Arthur Byard, Jr. on June 15, 1922 in Worcester, Massachusetts. His father was a member of the marching hands at the turn of the 20th century and played the trombone. His mother played the piano for the African Methodist Episcopalian Zion Church (AME). His maternal grandmother played the piano for the silent picture shows (visual movies without sound before “talking movies” were invented). It was on that piano that Jaki began his musical odyssey. When he was 8 years old, he started taking piano lessons from a piano teacher named Grace Johnson. The swing rhythm of the time and the lure of the big bands inspired Jaki throughout most of his career.

At the age of 16, he played his first professional engagement. During WW II, Jaki was drafted into the army, but with luck and circumstance, he was able to join the army along with Earl Bostic, with whom he would later form a musical alliance with.

By the time he was in his late-thirties, Jaki had a recording contract with Prestige records who engaged him in many recording sessions which allowed him the freedom to have his own compositions heard. It was also around this time that he performed with Charles Mingus as part of an ensemble that featured among its players many fabulous musicians: Eric Dolphy, Jack De Johnette, Johnny Coles and Bobby Jones, who toured Europe and made some great sounds and history. During the 1960’s, he saw great success, and all of his albums received mostly 3-4 star ratings in DownBeat magazine. In 1966, he won the Down Beat Jazz Poll Award for most promising musician of that year. In 1979, his 21-piece big band, The Apollo Stompers was voted the Best House Band in New York City while playing at Ali’s Alley, a club in downtown New York. On his own, Jaki was to win numerous awards and citations for his music and contributions to teaching and dance from many major academic institutions…….Read More

AmericansSwingingInParisCover

Here’s an amazing album from Zoot Sims named “Americans Swinging in Paris” that was recorded in 1956 but released in 2005. Very enjoyable music and from musicians (besides Sims) that are among the best but not household names. If you have only heard Zoot Sims a few times, this album will help you pay more attention to the quality of playing from this man and will force you to hear him more often. If you already recognize the ability of Zoot Sims then you probably have already placed him high up there on your personal list of best jazz tenors ever! Here’s the lineup: Bass – Benoit Quersin, Drums – Charles Saudrais,  Piano – Henri Renaud, Tenor Saxophone – Zoot Sims Trumpet – Jon Eardley (tracks: 1 to 3, 5 to 7.) Find out more about this album from Discogs, great source! ENJOY!

About the album:

American Swinging In Paris album for sale by Zoot Sims was released May 17, 2002 on the EMI Music Distribution label. Subtitled – The Brother. American Swinging In Paris buy CD music Import exclusive compilation, ‘Americans Swinging in Paris’ is a seven track collection recorded in 1956 featuring various Read More

HenriRenaudBioImage

More on Henri Renaud (From the Jazzwax Blog):

Clamart is a French town about five miles southwest of Paris. Each year since 1949, a jazz festival has been held there. In June 1951, soprano saxophonist Sidney Bechet was injured in a car accident on his way to the festival and was replaced by Don Byas. Also at the festival was French pianist Henri Renaud with his sextet.

Fortunately for us, the festival’s producer had invited the owner of Saturne Records. He dragged the group off to a studio and recorded them after their performance. Renaud’s band featured Bobby Jaspar (ts), Sandy Mosse (ts), Jimmy Gourley (g), Pierre Michelot (b) and Pierre Lemarchand (d). Saturne recorded them together and broke them up into small groups for the date……..Learn More

Final Update 11/17, 11 P.M. (EDT): Jazz Con Class Radio can be opened from iTunes Internet Radio Directory under the genre of “Jazz.” Please look at the others ways to connect to the stream in the prior updates, including inside the main iTunes Radio Directory. To get the full details go to this post of all the different ways to enjoy Jazz Con Class Radio. Thank you for your patience and  enjoy!

If you need help or have any questions email me through the FEEDBACK LINK.

iTunesIconImage

LATEST UPDATE 11/15 on 2A.M.(EDT) You can listen to Jazz Con Class Radio on your iTunes portal, JUST CLICK ON THIS LINK and/or  THIS LINK on image like the one above and choose “OPEN”  and choose “iTunes” to open it, These two link will open in your iTunes portal and the music will start playing, very simple! If you want to listen to the station directly through the iTunes portal and click on the “Jazz” genre, then you will have to wait a couple more days. I’m sorry but I have no control over the speed in which iTunes Internet Radio work

If you need help or have any questions email me through the FEEDBACK LINK.

UPDATE 11/12, 12:00 (EDT) Tunein Radio listeners can tune-in here. iTunes Internet Radio listeners still have to wait, I cannot do anything about it, they are SLOW to update. You have other alternatives, you can go directly to the Listen Now Link or/and you can tune in through both Android and iOS apps.

Original post:

I’m very sorry for the sudden stop of my SHOUTcast hosted server, I am working on the problem with them and trying to find out what exactly happened. Most importantly, I are trying to prevent it from happening any more. I the last 24 hours the server has gone down and back up again. These things happen in this environment all the times, the server temporarily goes down or breaks down completely.  I will be updating very frequently until broadcasted stream is resolved. Thank you for your patience and sorry for the inconvenience. Use the feedback link if you have any further questions concerning this issue. Thank you, Jose

ThePretidigitatorCover

Here’s a real “sleeper,” if you want to use that term. I prefer not to because this 1957 album was great when is was released back in 1957 but unfortunately was “overlooked.” “The Prestidigitator” is hard to find, not because it wasn’t available then and/or now but because George Wallington wasn’t a household name. The listeners on Jazz Con Class Radio have choice on where to hear the songs of this album because they can be found on this album, “J.R. Monterose Essential Jazz Masters” which is not available on Amazon at the moment. Great album, get it before its too late!

About the album:

Sicilian-born pianist “George Wallington” (his given name was Giacinto Figlia) had more than ethnicity in common with Dodo Marmarosa. Both men were active in the burgeoning bop scene of the early and mid-’40s, both made important contributions to the evolution of modern jazz, and both withdrew from public activity for protracted periods of time. Most importantly, both of these excellent pianists left enough great music in their wake to warrant a reappraisal of their legacies. Wallington named Mel Powell, Al Haig, and Bud Powell as his favorite contemporaries; primary influences were Art Tatum, Count Basie, and especially Earl Hines. He collaborated and consulted with Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie, Oscar Pettiford, and Max Roach during bop’s formative years; later he would befriend young Mose Allison and help him to get established as both recording artist and jazz essayist. Recorded in early April 1957 and released on the East West label the following year, Wallington’s album The Prestidigitator is an excellent example of his creative approach to the art of jazz. His quintet/quartet on this album consisted of bassist Teddy Kotick, drummer Nick Stabulas, Detroit-born tenor saxophonist J.R. Monterose, and bass trumpeter Jerry Lloyd, who sounds for all the world like a valve trombonist. Three of the seven pieces were composed by…..Read More

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Biography of George Wallington (From Scott Yanow- AllMusic.com):

George Wallington was one of the first and best bop pianists, ranking up there with Al Haig, just below Bud Powell. He was also the composer of two bop standards that caught on for a time: “Lemon Drop” and “Godchild.” Born in Sicily, Wallington and his family moved to the U.S. in 1925. He arrived in New York in the early ’40s and was a member of the first bop group to play on 52nd Street, Dizzy Gillespie’s combo of 1943-1944. After spending a year with Joe Marsala’s band, Wallington played with the who’s who of bop during 1946-1952, including Charlie Parker, Serge Chaloff, Allan Eager, Kai Winding, Terry Gibbs, Brew Moore, Al Cohn, Gerry Mulligan, Zoot Sims, and Red Rodney. He toured Europe with Lionel Hampton’s ill-fated big band of 1953, and during 1954-1960 he led groups in New York that….Read More

CrosstownCover

This album “Crosstown” is a compilation of recordings done in Van Gelder’s studio in 1955. They all took place on three separate dates, May 22nd, May 31st and September 1st and with Eddie Bert on Trombone, JR. Monterose on Tenor, Joe Puma on Guitar, Hank Jones on Piano, either Wendell Marshall or Clyde Lombardi on Bass and Kenny Clarke on Drums. A certain hit with all these greats on board! Enjoy!

About the album:

When trombonist Eddie Bert made these recordings he was at a point in his career where his playing was illustrative of all the eloquence that is representative of that many-dimensioned individual. Eddie had emerged as a major voice on his horn in 1954, when the Metronome Yearbook awarded him as one of the four “Musicians of the Year.” Eddie was one of those musicians on the Jazz scene……Read More

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Biography of Eddie Bert:

Eddie Bert had a long career in jazz and in the studios, managing to go almost unnoticed by all but his fellow musicians. A fine and flexible soloist, Bert also played a large part behind the scenes, performing his parts quite capably in orchestras. Among his early teachers were fellow trombonists Benny Morton and Trummy Young. In 1940, when he was 18, Bert joined Sam Donahue’s Orchestra, and two years later cut his first solo on record, “Jersey Bounce,” with Red Norvo’s band. Bert gigged with the orchestras of Charlie Barnet (1943) and Woody Herman, performed at a well-recorded Town Hall concert with Norvo in 1944, where he was extensively featured and, after a stint in the military, he worked during the next decade with such orchestras as Herbie Fields, Stan Kenton (1947-1948 and 1950-1951), Benny Goodman (1948-1949), Woody Herman again, and Les Elgart. From 1952-1955, Bert recorded several dates as a leader for Discovery, Savoy, Jazztone, and Trans-World, showing that he could be a personable bop-based improviser in small groups, too. He worked and recorded with Charles Mingus in late 1955, rejoined Goodman in 1957….. Learn More

LeeKonitzLiveAtTheHalfNoteCover

This “Live” recorded 1959 album from the Verve label is a real classic and every jazz fan should have a copy at home. The description below is about the best general description that you can find online. The most disturbing thing about this album and many, many others is when it was released, that’s 1994! Very, very disturbing!

About the album:

The music on this two-CD set has a strange history. Pianist Lennie Tristano had a rare reunion with altoist Lee Konitz and tenor saxophonist Warne Marsh (his two greatest “students”) during an extended stay at the Half Note in 1959. Tristano took Tuesday nights off to teach and Bill Evans was his substitute, but the pianist had a couple of those performances recorded for posterity. While listening to his tapes years later, he was so impressed with Marsh’s playing that he sent edited versions (comprised entirely of the tenor man’s solos) to Marsh, and somehow they ended up being released in that form by the Revelation label. In 1994, the unedited music was finally issued by Verve; the consistently exciting playing by Konitz, Marsh, and Evans…..Read More

MatingCallCover

Mating Call” is primarily a Tadd Dameron album, all compositions are by him. Of course, having John Coltrane on board always  opens up the opportunity to create a masterpiece. Its important to note, this 1956 album was recorded prior to Coltrane’s groundbreaking “Blue Train.” This particular album is considered to be a classic example of hard bop and its limitless possibilities. Hard Bop, which blossomed from Bebop, is often misunderstood and labeled as not having the extended range to improvise enough to be categorized as Avant-Garde. Whom ever things in this manner is totally out of their rocker! Hard Bop is the root of ALL avant-Garde! Get this album, its a real sleeper!

About the album:

Digitally remastered by Phil De Lancie (1992, Fantasy Studios, Berkeley, California). This fine set, recorded on November 30, 1956, has been reissued several times, often as a John Coltrane date, but make no mistake, this is a Tadd Dameron session, and his elegant compositions are its key component. Coltrane was fresh off playing with Miles Davis in 1956 and was still a year away from heading his own sessions and three years away from recording Giant Steps, so it might be said that he was in transition, but then when was Coltrane not in transition?. Dameron wisely gives him plenty of…… Read More

JazzConClassLogo

There are a multitude of ways to enjoy Jazz Con Class Radio. I will start with all the physical devices (Output):

1. A computer (Microsoft Widows based or Apple iOS based.)

2. An Android based smart phone and/or tablet. An iOS based iPhone and/or iPad.

3. A streaming media device. You have Roku, Apple TV, Chromecast, Amazon Fire TV and more

4. Wireless Home Audio Systems: Sonos, Pioneer, Bose and many, many more.

5. Bluetooth Speakers: Logiteck Jawbone, JBL and many more.

Then you have many different ways to obtain the stream itself (Input):

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1. Directly from the website. (CLICK IMAGE TO TEST)

2. Download the latest version located on the official page of iTunes  through your PC or Mac. After you have downloaded it just click the Internet Radio link, click on the “Jazz” Genre and then choose “Jazz Con Class Radio.”

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3. By way of the .pls file:  JUST CLICK ON THIS LINK (or The iTunes Logo on the website image above, CLICK Image TO TEST) and choose “OPEN”  and then choose “iTunes” to open it. The link will open your iTunes portal and the music will start playing, very simple!

4. The Jazz Con Class Radio Android App.

5. The Jazz Con Class Radio iOS App.

6. Through Tunein Radio (On Computer or with their app)

7. There are many other streaming players out there that are not recommended and simply don’t work.

I will update this post as soon I find more dependable ways to listen to the Jazz Con Class Radio broadcast.

MelMartinJazzSaxophoneForum

Jazz Musician Mel Martin has establish an enormous following on his Saxophone Forum. It is located on Facebook and it is actually public! It is also important to note, Mel is rather serious to a point, concerning the rules of engagement. The members (940 and rapidly growing) are not subject to any strict restriction at all but need to follow a few simple rules. They are listed at the top of the forum and read as follows:

“This is a forum for fans and performers of real Jazz saxophone. Discussions are expected to be civil, intelligent and real. No smooth Jazz posts, Jam of the week posts or trolling. Looking forward to some great interaction about Jazz saxophone players and playing. Not a technical forum so please don’t go on about setups, reeds, m’pieces etc. NO ADS, LISTS or SPAM! Please avoid any “gossipy” or speculative posts discussing the personal or supposedly perceived emotional issues of any player, living or dead. This only leads to more speculation and personal opinion. Back stories, factual statements and personal insights are certainly welcome. Keep it real!”

“The spirit of the MMJSF – Great Music, Great Players!”

Simple enough to follow and actually represents the attitude and behavior for members of ANY forum to follow. Mel’s forum is rather specific though, since it concentrates on the saxophone and the talented jazz musicians who master it. Not only does it deal with the well known Tenor and Alto Saxophones but is equally represented with the Baratone and Soprano Sax also. By no means, does it eliminate the other instruments, they are equally admired as well since they are part of the music that broadcasts there. Oh yes, you will hear quite a bit of incredible recordings there, that’s actually what the forum is about! The atmosphere is very professional and at the same time, very educational. The conversations can range from interactions between two or more established jazz musicians conversing about other jazz greats, to interactions between new curious followers of jazz who are hungry to learn more about this thing called “Jazz.” Its a lot of fun and I recommend everyone of ALL ages to visit. You can’t go wrong and most importantly, will never feel intimidated, so go to Mel Martin’s Jazz Saxophone Forum (MMJSF) and have some real fun!

ShellyManneCompleteLiveAtTheBlackHawkCover

This album is a collection of all the live performances (4 CD Box Set) of Shelly Manne and his very talented band, consisting of Bass on Monty Budwig, Piano on Victor Feldman, Tenor Saxophone on Richie Kamuca, Trumpet on Joe Gordon, here’s the discography for this Box-Set. All the information needed  for the Jazz Con Class Radio to learn more about “Shelly Manne and His Men Complete Live at the Black Hawk” and about Shelly Manne himself, is found further down on this post. Enjoy!

About the album, article from Marc Myers (JazzWax):

When Shelly Manne agreed to play San Francisco’s Black  Hawk club in September 1959, he viewed the gig as a working vacation. For months, the West Coast drummer had endured a grueling schedule, spending days in Hollywood’s movie and TV studios and nights at Los Angeles-area clubs. Taking on the extended San Francisco engagement with his newly formed quintet meant a return to bop without the commercial distractions. No insistent studio contractors. No time-crazed producers. And no stress of first-take film dates.

But just a week after the Black Hawk engagement began, Manne picked up the phone and called Lester Koenig, the founder of Contemporary Records. Manne and Koenig had been close since Manne began recording extensively for the label in 1952. “I’ve never asked this before,” Manne reportedly said to Koenig during the call, “but we all feel you should come up and record the group at the club.” The next day, September 22d, Koenig arrived with recording equipment and remained at the club for three successive nights…..Read More

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About Shelly Manne (Wikipedia):

Shelly Manne (June 11, 1920 – September 26, 1984), born Sheldon Manne in New York City, was an American jazz drummer. Most frequently associated with West Coast jazz, he was known for his versatility and also played in a number of other styles, including Dixieland, swing, bebop, avant-garde jazz and fusion, as well as contributing to the musical background of hundreds of Hollywood films and television programs.

Family and origins:

Manne’s father and uncles were drummers. In his youth he admired many of the leading swing drummers of the day, especially Jo Jones and Dave Tough.[1] Billy Gladstone, a colleague of Manne’s father and the most admired percussionist on the New York theatrical scene, offered the teenage Shelly tips and encouragement.[2] From that time, Manne rapidly developed his style in the clubs of 52nd Street in New York in the late 1930s and 1940s.[3] His first professional job with a known big band was with the Bobby Byrne Orchestra in 1940.[4] In those years, as he became known, he recorded with jazz stars like Coleman Hawkins, Charlie Shavers, and Don Byas. He also worked with a number of musicians mainly associated with Duke Ellington, like Johnny Hodges, Harry Carney, Lawrence Brown, and Rex Stewart.[5]……Learn More

 

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