Posts by: "Jose Reyes"

I want to introduce the Jazz Festival Project as a proposal to all the Jazz Con Class Radio listeners. The main goal of this project is to successfully organize the VERY FIRST Jazz Festival on Jazz Con Class Radio. It will be a lengthy process that will depend solely on the participation of all the listeners and their collaboration with me. Most of the work will be done by me, so don’t worry! The goal is to have at least 35 individuals involved, in order to begin the process. There will be three stages needed to be completed before any announcement of the festival date could be announced. Here are the three stages ( In order, no stage will begin until the previous one is completed):

Stage One: Have at least 35 individuals who are willing to participate and go all the way!

Stage Two: Gather a prepared introduction by each individual that I will be showcasing and 10 songs of their choice. (The music must totally reflect what broadcasts on Jazz Con Class Radio)

Stage Three: Create a weekly schedule for the festival.

As all the readers here can see, this Jazz Festival will be by and for the participants and benefit ALL the listeners! Its really not so difficult to prepare the playlists with the participants but only when they are totally devoted to making the Festival work. So if you would like to be part of it, PLEASE think it over well before you deciding to accept it, be 100% sure. Don’t worry, I will make it very simple for you. If anyone is interested or have any questions concerning this project, comment here or go to the FEEDBACK link.

This week’s “Saturday Jazz Show” (Tomorrow, 9/14) will feature all “LIVE” performances. That means that you will only hear live recordings for FIVE straight hours! A barrage of the best Jazz musicians that ever walked this planet and delivered to you by the most unique Jazz station on the internet, Jazz Con Class Radio! This show will air at 2 A.M. on Saturday morning and then will repeat again in the afternoon at 1 P.M. (All Times are New York standard times). Check the Schedule link here and/or tune in on your favorite medium here. Please note, depending on how many people will be available to tune it this week, will determine if I should replay it the following Saturday. I normally do this for special presentations like this because the listeners want it that way! Folks, I don’t want to tease you here but I  just finished preparing this playlist and it is very special indeed! Tune in, don’t miss it and ENJOY IT!!

Who would have thought that Joe Henderson would produce one of his best recordings in 1985? There’s nothing “shocking” for me or any other knowledgeable Joe Henderson fan to imagine that he was so called, “Over the Hill.” The only concern would rest on how “Sharp” he would be at the age of 48, would he be able to deliver that particular signature “Message” to the listeners? Further concern would be the “Live” setting, would he be as effective where there would be no place to hide, no place to disguise any sort of wear n’ tear. Well, there’s no doubt about it, he frankly knocks all the listeners on their ass with this performance, WOW!! Joe Henderson is a true master to all Jazz musicians and fans alike. He always had a modern “rebel” type of style that particularly flourished during the 60’s, he was a true improvisational force! The great thing about the Joe Henderson “sound” is how equally it is “understood” and admired by those who were simply too young and have recently become familiar to his music. He was truly very “Cool” when he broke into the scene in 1963 and is still considered to be a Jazz “Aficionado” to the new and more modern appreciating Jazz fan. There’s a place for him in all Jazz fans’ heart, what an “inspirational” individual he was! More on Joe Henderson (Wiki) here.  Read this article about this particular performance (Bluenote.com). You can purchase it here.

Here’s Isotope from this album:

Yes indeed! This is very early LEE Morgan and a perfect example of how talented he was and where how bright his future would be in the world of Jazz. Yes indeed, this album was recorded in 1956 and that made Lee Morgan only 18 years old. It was his official FIRST recording as a leader and features the “support” of 4 other great musicians who were much older than him, Horace Silver – piano,Clarence Sharpe – alto saxophone, Wilbur Ware – bass, Philly Joe Jones – drums. A great album and a must have if you are a Jazz collector!

Here’s “Little T”:

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Just to get an "Idea," this is the music that broadcasts on Jazz Con Class Radio and just played now, ENJOY IT!!!!!Horace Silver "The Outlaw'" Live at Newport '58 Louis Smith (trumpet) Junior Cook (tenor saxophone) Horace Silver (piano) Gene Taylor (bass) Louis Hayes (dru... ... See MoreSee Less

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I have created a Fundraiser Campaign to help keep Jazz Con Class Radio broadcasting 24 Hours a Day and 7 Days a Week WITHOUT ANY commercials. NEW broadcasting fees have been added to my already high expenses to keep this unique internet Jazz station alive. As of right now, I will be paying DOUBLE to keep the broadcast playing in a 24/7 basis. Learn more on how you can help HERE

Here’s a great vintage Freddie Hubbard recording that is not praised enough because of the year it was made. 1981 wasn’t a very “popular” year for Jazz and for three legendary Jazz musicians that specifically helped modernize Jazz 20 years prior, in the mid 60’s. This LIVE recording was an excellent example of how special they were and how they didn’t lose a single beat! We’re talking about Freddie Hubbard, Joe Henderson and Bobby Hutcherson in their 40’s and in a non-studio atmosphere, at Keystone Korner, San Francisco, California. This album was recorded on a weekend and released in two volumes. Volume One featured Sunday’s performances and Volume Two featured Friday and Saturday. These two albums are a must-have and an ideal investment for a Jazz collector, not to mention, it is a historical weekend, time will tell!

Here’s a great example here’s “Red Clay” (from the Friday/Saturday Session):

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By Greg Lehmann

“I Called Him Morgan” is a moving tribute to the legendary musician Lee Morgan. Documentary filmmaker Kasper Collin has given us the chance to finally get some idea as to what led up to the tragic killing of Lee Morgan at the hands of his (common-law) wife Helen back in Feb. 1972 at the now defunct jazz venue Slugs, then located on 3rd St. on the Lower East Side of Manhattan. With the help of a sound recordings made by an adult education teacher / radio host and jazz enthusiast who discovered inadvertently that one of his students had been married to a jazz musician, he then asked what his name was and was told that his name was Lee to which he replied – ” Lee Morgan ? ” Helen affirmed this to be true, which led to the educator – Mr.Larry Reni Thomas of Wilmington, N.C. requesting that he conduct an interview with Helen and she replied that she would think about it. She eventually did contact Mr. Thomas and proceeded to tell him on tape in a series of interviews about how the two met and how their relationship developed up to and including that fateful final day that ended Lee Morgan’s life. There were numerous noteworthy musicians who were interviewed for this documentary, including – Wayne Shorter, Jymie Merritt, Larry Ridley, Billy Harper, and Paul West. There is extensive use of the B & W photos of legendary Blue Note Records co-owner Francis Wolff, in addition to numerous clips featuring Lee Morgan along side his fellow musicians who performed with him in the Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers ensamble. The director Kasper Collin must be credited for including extended musical excerpts in his production. The film is a must see for any true lover of Lee Morgan’s trumpet playing, in addition to which it provides compelling insight to one of the jazz world’s greatest human tragedies. The film is currently being screened in N.Y.C. at the Lincoln Center Film Society venue on 65th St. bet. Broadway and Amsterdam Ave. (south side of the street). Starting on March 31, it will be screened at the Metrograph Theater at 7 Ludlow St. on the Lower East Side of Manhattan. Check their websites or call for further details. 

Here’s the trailer to the documentary “I Called Him Morgan.”:

Here’s the website for Film Society Lincoln Center and where you can learn more of the public screenings of “I Called Him Morgan.”

Here’s the homepage (Check Calendar link) for the Metrograph Theater, in case you cannot make it to Lincoln Center.

Greg Lehman- Is a multi-diciplinary artist and performer, who works as a teacher in NYC and has been an avid collector of (mostly Jazz) records for most of his adult life.

If you have any questions for Greg concerning the review, please use the comment section here.

As a promotional tool, I have created a podcast page on iTunes for the sole purpose of promoting Jazz Con Class Radio for those who are not aware of the station. I’m always trying to find a new path that would branch out the tree of Jazz music. This is not only important for this radio station but for all Jazz fans to be involved in, spreading the word about Jazz music and its importance is really our duty. Keeping it to yourself can be sort of self destructing for Classical/Traditional Jazz music in general, because it stops it from spreading out (branching out) to the upcoming generations. Here’s my official 1st podcast, I named it “A Bebop Teaser.” You can also check it out on my Jazz Con Class Radio on the  iTunes Podcast page and/or the Google Play Podcast Portal. Here’s my Podcast link on this website. ENJOY!

This is a fantastic album and one of “Seven” recordings that Lee Morgan released as a leader in a two years span 1956 and 1957, check his discography here. City Lights was another example of how the Jazz musicians of those times helped the up and coming stars. Lee Morgan at age 19 here, held his own but still needed the “support” from the established ones. As you will read in the article below, 3 of the 5 tunes on the album were written by Benny Golson and one by Gigi Gryce. The 50’s were historically a very special time for Jazz as many great composers emerged to help Jazz rejuvenate itself. Lee Morgan contributed with many great tunes of his own and passed on the torch. Great recording, get it!

More on the album (AllAboutJazz):

This album may not enjoy the same status as Charlie Chaplin’s revered movie of the same title, but it’s a session that evokes similar feelings. Like the beloved Tramp, Lee Morgan wins our respect with a performance of exceptional warmth and dignity, grace and beauty, sprinkled with moments of gentle humor. His playing on this session anticipates, more than do his immediately subsequent recordings, the composer of the sublimely poetic “Ceora” (Cornbread, 1965).

Also credit Benny Golson, who provided three of the five tunes and the arrangements for the sextet on this date. Beginning with Lee Morgan Sextet (December, 1956) to City Lights (August, 1957), Golson supplied four consecutive recordings’ worth of material for the developing session leader— compositions and textures that would showcase the young artist while lending form and focus to his creative energies……More Here

Here’s “Tempo de Waltz”:

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Just to get an "Idea," this is the music that broadcasts on Jazz Con Class Radio and just played now, ENJOY IT!!!!!Horace Silver "The Outlaw'" Live at Newport '58 Louis Smith (trumpet) Junior Cook (tenor saxophone) Horace Silver (piano) Gene Taylor (bass) Louis Hayes (dru... ... See MoreSee Less

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This is a very little spoken about album of Art Blakey which, in my mind, ranks right up there near the very top and to sort of create some controversy, could possibly be his best “Live” set ever recorded. This statement I’m making can be easily compared to piloting kamikaze plane because all of Art Blakey’s contributions to Jazz are considered to be over-the-top. I feel the reason why this recording is not mentioned enough simply lies on the unfamiliarity of the title, “Utgetsu.” So I did a quick search and found out that it was a highly acclaimed 1953  Japanese motion picture. Then I asked myself, why would Art Blakey name the album after this movie? The answer could be found in a very interesting and detailed article that I bumped into when connecting the word “Utgetsu” with this remarkable 1963 recording. It is on “Michael Doherty’s Music Log” where you can find it. To get to the exact article itself, just click here or the one below:

…………”Ugetsu

The title track opens with Art explaining that “ugetsu” is a Japanese word meaning “fantasy.” And what a fantasy. Fast-paced, upbeat, grooving – with some excellent work on horn, particularly by Freddie Hubbard on trumpet. Holy moly, some of those notes seem invented just for this song, and by his trumpet alone.

In the new liner notes written by Neil Tesser for this release, it says that “ugetsu” actually translates as “pale moon after the rain.” With that in mind, it’s easy to hear some of Cedar Walton’s piano playing as rain – or even a short burst of storm that catches folks unaware but happy. The sort of storm you want to get caught in. This track is tremendous. Cedar Walton wrote this one…….Read it all

Here’s the song “Ugetsu,” from the album (YouTube) what a beautiful song! Listen closely and listen Art Blakey introduction. Make sure you go ahead and buy this album ASAP! You will find yourself listening to it over and over, it is truly a “Fantasy,” ENJOY!:

More on the album (CDUniverse.com liner notes):

Ugetsu, a 1963 live set from the original Birdland, finds Art Blakey & His Jazz Messengers at the peak of their powers with one of their strongest lineups. The group primarily recorded sessions for Alfred Lion’s Blue Note label, but this Riverside date is as strong as any of their previous outings. Having acquired the services of trombonist Curtis Fuller in 1961, the Messengers’ front line was its most robust ever, with Wayne Shorter and Freddie Hubbard consistently turning in some of their best performances. Rounding out the rhythm section with Blakey are the equally powerful Reggie Workman and Cedar Walton. The Messengers’ set list finds the majority of tunes written by musical director Wayne Shorter, as well as a few choice numbers from Curtis Fuller and Cedar Walton’s title cut. The group is spurred on by a very receptive crowd, tempos and solos are spirited for the most part, and Blakey seems……Read More

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Please CLICK ON THE IMAGE to ENLARGE.

Jazz Con Class Radio is and has been broadcasting on iTunes in the conventional manner, in case you were puzzled why Jazz Con Class Radio would be off air. This change took me a total of 30 minutes to make but it took eternity for iTunes Internet Radio. It seems that the iTunes Internet Radio (Non)Support team takes its sweet time to make a simple change. Meanwhile, my chances of losing the listeners increases drastically everyday. This has happened before more than once, they have been true to their word ONLY once over numerous changes I had to make in the past. This latest incident (12/21/2016) took them “16 Days” to make the update, the message above was the confirmation message that I received after I initiated the update submission process on December 21, 2016! It was today, January 5th of the New Year, that the changes were made and they never sent me a confirmation email!

The great thing about Jazz is that it gives you “Freedom” of Choice” and I found “another way” to hear the broadcast on iTunes, so you don’t have to wait. (This only applies to those who tune in to Jazz Con Class Radio from their PC or MAC). Here’s how and ENJOY:

This way is a much more direct and easier way to listen in/with iTunes. Just click on this link/.pls file and open it with “iTunes.” If this way is giving you trouble, then read the simple instruction below with image support.

Read Instructions before clicking:

Click on the image BELOW and OPEN the .PLS file with iTunes when popup box opens:

Click on Image after reading INSTRUCTIONS

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Just to get an "Idea," this is the music that broadcasts on Jazz Con Class Radio and just played now, ENJOY IT!!!!!Horace Silver "The Outlaw'" Live at Newport '58 Louis Smith (trumpet) Junior Cook (tenor saxophone) Horace Silver (piano) Gene Taylor (bass) Louis Hayes (dru... ... See MoreSee Less

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I want to thank all the listeners who have been listening to Jazz Con Class Radio from the beginning and all the new loyal listeners who have joined throughout the FIVE years the station has existed. Have a Happy New Year and E N J O Y ! !

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Just to get an "Idea," this is the music that broadcasts on Jazz Con Class Radio and just played now, ENJOY IT!!!!!Horace Silver "The Outlaw'" Live at Newport '58 Louis Smith (trumpet) Junior Cook (tenor saxophone) Horace Silver (piano) Gene Taylor (bass) Louis Hayes (dru... ... See MoreSee Less

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2016endofyeardriveimage

Hello fellow loyal Jazz Con Class Radio listeners! This is the “2016 End Of Year Drive” and the time of year when the listeners can give back to my station, in order to further help the development and progress of this Jazz station this listening portal I have built for you. It will also help insure the station stays on the air. I will not proceed to emphasize and cry about all the expenses/costs to maintain the broadcast. All I need for you to understand is that Jazz Con Class Radio is a legitimate internet radio station with several services that need to be compensated. So of course, in order for me to keep the station “Live” and “Alive” these services need to be paid.  I have been able to keep the station going  for almost 4 years now and would like it to continue for many years to come. Unfortunately like everything else, the cost to maintain it always goes up and that’s why I need a little help from you. There will be two ways to contribute and make this drive a successful one, thank you for your help:
1. You can donate any amount by clicking on the “Donate” button:




 

2. Or you can purchase the “World Class” Jazz Con Class Radio” T-Shirt on the “Official T-Shirt ” link.

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Just to get an "Idea," this is the music that broadcasts on Jazz Con Class Radio and just played now, ENJOY IT!!!!!Horace Silver "The Outlaw'" Live at Newport '58 Louis Smith (trumpet) Junior Cook (tenor saxophone) Horace Silver (piano) Gene Taylor (bass) Louis Hayes (dru... ... See MoreSee Less

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If you simply ask any Charles Mingus fan which recording is his best, they would probably answer you with the obvious, “All his recording are great!” This would probably be my answer also, since I am a true fan of his work. This rationale, in my opinion, probably applies to all Mingus fans. I treat every recording of his, uniquely, they all have a different effect on me and they are all masterpieces! Now, if you ask a so-called “Jazz Aficionado” the same question, the answer would most likely be either this particular album or Mingus Ah Um. Both of these records would be the topic of conversation and discussed in detail. The other Mingus “masterpieces” would just get honorable mentions, with little said about them. We all know that Charles Mingus was a true genius, there’s no debating it but sadly he was given a “Raw Deal,” just as many other Jazz greats were. Being controversial was not accepted until the mid to late 60’s. Now, if Mingus was playing this now, he would flourish enormously and would most likely establish himself as an underground hero! His unique style of presenting and showcasing Jazz music in all sorts of improvisational moods, would make him an icon! This album here, “The Black Saint and the Sinner Lady” is a unique masterpiece but again, not anything different from the others. All Mingus recordings are masterpieces and they all have a life of their own! Here’s the discography for this album.

Here’s the first track of this album:

More on the album (AllAboutJazz.com):

Some Mingus albums are like a tremendous three-ring circus. You’ll laugh, you’ll cry, you’ll be struck with awe and delight. The music is absorbing, intense, harrowing, beautiful. Drop everything and run to the show, and don’t expect to get anything else done at the same time: this is about as far from background music as it gets. A great Mingus album is a totally involving experience. This is especially true of one of the only jazz albums to have liner notes written by a clinical psychologist: The Black Saint and the Sinner Lady. Mingus chimes in with a peroration of his own, too, including, “I feel no need to explain any further the music herewith other than to say throw all other records of mine away except maybe one….Read More

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Just to get an "Idea," this is the music that broadcasts on Jazz Con Class Radio and just played now, ENJOY IT!!!!!Horace Silver "The Outlaw'" Live at Newport '58 Louis Smith (trumpet) Junior Cook (tenor saxophone) Horace Silver (piano) Gene Taylor (bass) Louis Hayes (dru... ... See MoreSee Less

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heavysoulcover

Ike Quebec had an up and down career, from a promising tenor saxophone player with high demand in the 40’s to a bad drug problem throughout the 50’s. Fortunately, he was able to break away from this killer addiction and make a brief comeback that started in 1959. In that year he recorded a compilation album consisting of 45’s that were sold for jukeboxes during that year, “From Hackensack to Englewood Cliffs.Then Alfred Lion (Head Bluenote Records) recorded another compilation album that consisted of those tunes and more 45’s ( they ranged from 1959 to 1962). © Copyright 2010 CorbisCorporationBoth of these albums were not released until the years 2000 and 2005, respectively. A pretty raw deal for the fans but was probably done because of this  November 1961 recording here, “Heavy Soul” which was released almost immediately in March of 1962. Not to mention, so called “Soul Jazz” was coming into its own and this recording featured the great Freddie Roach on the organ. Unfortunately Ike Quebec passed away 3 years later in 1965 from lung cancer. Ike Quebec never was able to get his due, as many older Jazz musicians will tell you that he was one of the greatest! More on Ike Quebec here.

More on this album (from Smallromanceblog.com):

Many times, we overlook and we miss some great voices and artists in all music genres. When that happens, it’s a mixed feeling. On one hand, we’re glad for the discovery. On the other, we feel sorry for the musician who never got recognition during his life, and only thanks to the internet and the world getting smaller – he get the respect he deserves. Ike Quebec is a good example for that…..Read More

Here’s a great article on/about Ike Quebec and mentions “Heavy Soul.” (from Burning Ambulance.com):

Every so often, something you’ve been taking for granted hits you in the forehead like a thrown mallet, and you spend the next little while walking around wondering what you could possibly have been thinking—or not thinking—your whole life. The awesomeness of the Blue Note Records catalog of the 1960s is the kind of thing that’s so impossible to dispute that you can start to take it for granted. You can start to not really hear the music anymore, because you can put any random disc on, and even if it’s slightly less mind-warpingly beautiful than other titles by the same artist—if it’s only better than anything else you’ve heard that month, rather than the kind of thing that sends you staggering into traffic like Kevin McCarthy at the end of Invasion of the Body Snatchers, pounding on strangers’ car hoods and demanding “Have you heard Lee Morgan‘s Search for the New Land? Have you fucking heard this album?”—even if it’s not that life-altering, it’s still great. But that much greatness, so readily available, can numb you. You can start to take it for granted. Which is when it’s time to dip into the dustier corners and pull out stuff you may not have paid much attention to before.

Ike Quebec is not really in the pantheon of Blue Note players of the 1960s. That’s partly because he died in the earliest days of 1963, before the label’s sudden infusion of creativity and new blood (think about all the dudes who made their Blue Note…….. Read More

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informaljazzpost

Straight forward Hard Bop Jazz, could be the meaning behind the informality in the title of the album. Or maybe it could be the list of legendary individualists who makeup this sextet, WOW! Its a great testament to the unselfish gratitude these specific Jazz artists had towards each other during this golden Jazz age of the 50’s. Its so clearly evident to me, time after time, when searching for recordings (albums and songs) through discographies. They were all associated with each other and in so many helpful ways. One very important attribute was the quality behind the improvising and the endless inventiveness. It seems that by supporting each other so strongly the competitive level rose but in a positive manner which in turn, increased their creative level. This 1956 album, “Informal Jazz” is a perfect example, get it and treasure it! Learn more about the Prestige Records label, great stuff to know!

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This is a marvelous “Live” recording among many from Thelonious Monk. This gem consists of two recording dates, recorded on October 31, and November 1, 1964. This album was issued twice, the first was “18 years” after, in 1982 and was then reissued as a double CD in 1998 with extra tracks (Complete Version.) The recording took place in a Los Angeles Jazz club named the “It Club” as the album cover clearly states and has a different album cover image in the reissue version. As for any information about this Jazz club, I have run into a wall, no details anywhere? This quartet is easily Monk’s favorite and most notable, you have Monk on Piano, Charlie Rouse on Tenor Sax, Larry Gales on Bass and Ben Riley on Drums, quite a “Tight” band! This album could be Monk’s best or close to it.

liveattheitclubcover

More on album (1998 Reissue) (100 Greatest Jazz Albums.blogspot.com):

Thelonious Monk was one of Alfred Lion’s most difficult to launch performers at Blue Note. Sales of his albums were thin and did not improve much after he had left Blue Note for Riverside. Monk’s style and uncompromising approach was always going to be difficult to get across; a kind of lop sided stride piano infused with a deep blues commitment. A determination not to conform to accepted notions of polish and slickness of presentation. These were the hallmark’s of Monk’s take on jazz.

The French critics Charles and Comolli even want to say that Monk’s approach was a deliberate act of refusal. (“It’s well known that Monk’s creation seems to derive from refusal, from hard choices, and thus it resists all kinds of impulses, possibilities, openings, solutions: that special note is like a challenge to the other notes….. Monk’s music says more by saying less: the restrained, compressed……Read More

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Just to get an "Idea," this is the music that broadcasts on Jazz Con Class Radio and just played now, ENJOY IT!!!!!Horace Silver "The Outlaw'" Live at Newport '58 Louis Smith (trumpet) Junior Cook (tenor saxophone) Horace Silver (piano) Gene Taylor (bass) Louis Hayes (dru... ... See MoreSee Less

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SungSongCover

What can I say about Sun Ra and his inventive arrangements? Absolutely BRILLIANT! As weird as Sun Ra has been personally portrayed, his musical genius is unmatched. There are only a few Jazz cats that can produce these incredible works of art! This 1956 recording was renamed to “Sun Song” and the album cover was changed in 1967 to the likes of the image above, here’s more information (from Wiki). A true Classic recording!

Here’s a great song from this album:

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jazzbysunravol1cover

Original Album Cover from the Transition Label

More on the album:

The late pianist/bandleader/composer Sun Ra was one of the earliest musicians to embrace the jazz avant-garde, and some credit him as being a point of origin for it. Be that it may, SUN SONG is one of the Ra’s earliest and most accessible albums. Recorded in the mid-1950s and consisting mostly of Ra originals, SUN features….Read More

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Just to get an "Idea," this is the music that broadcasts on Jazz Con Class Radio and just played now, ENJOY IT!!!!!Horace Silver "The Outlaw'" Live at Newport '58 Louis Smith (trumpet) Junior Cook (tenor saxophone) Horace Silver (piano) Gene Taylor (bass) Louis Hayes (dru... ... See MoreSee Less

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BlueMitchellSonny RedBaltimore1966

There are great recording surfacing as late as now and this is definitely one of them. It’s a LIVE 1966 performance from Blue Mitchell with Sonny Red and became available early in February of this year. This album, “Blue Mitchell & Sonny Red Baltimore 1966 (Uptown Records)” took place in Baltimore on March 20th and was part of the Left Bank Jazz Society, an infamous organization that hosted a great number of Jazz greats from 1966 to 1984 and eventually closed its doors in the 90’s, here’s more. To learn more of this specific concert and Left Bank Jazz Society read this very detailed post by Marc Myers. Blue Mitchell has a tremendous resume, from being part of great historical Jazz recording to leader of great ensembles, check his discography. Sonny Red’s was a legend himself, learn more here. I have been trying to find a list of all the “performances” they sponsored but all I have found as of right now is from 8/16/64 to 5/7/67. There were a total of 350 concerts and most of them recorded but not enough of them remastered and released. If I find out more about this mysterious Jazz Society I will add it here and vice versa, if you find out more, please add it on the comment section.

More on the Album:

Baltimore 1966 album for sale by Blue Mitchell / Sonny Red was released Mar 18, 2016 on the Uptown Records (R&B) label. Liner Note Author: Bob Blumenthal. Baltimore 1966 CD music contains a single disc with 6 songs.

Here’s a tune from this concert:

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LouTakesOffCover

Lou Donaldson was a big force in the “Hard Bop” movement which evolved directly from Bebop in the very early 50’s. He was very much established as a premier alto saxophone player by 1957 and when this album was recorded. He apparently was very up-to-date with the surprise launch of of the historic Russian Sputnik satellite mission and used it on the album cover. “Sweet Lou” was certainly taking off and recorded a ton of albums afterwards, here’s his discography.

More on the Album:

When Lou Donaldson emerged in the early 1950s, virtually every young alto-saxophonist sounded like a close relative of Charlie Parker. While Bird would always be an influence on him, Donaldson (who is still playing very well these days at age 82) had his own approach to playing jazz, and he quickly became instantly recognizable as a more soulful and bluesy player, one who was nicknamed “Sweet Lou.” Donaldson could always play bebop with the best but he also loves to caress ballads and to really dig deep….Read More

LouDonaldsonCliffordBrown

Lou Donaldson’s Biography:

Jazz critics agree that “Sweet Poppa Lou” Donaldson is one of the greatest alto saxophonists of all time.  He began his career as a bandleader with Blue Note Records in 1952 and, already at age 25, he had found his sound, though it would continue to sweeten over the years — earning him his famed nickname –“Sweet Poppa Lou.”  He made a series of classic records for Blue Note in the 50’s, and takes pride in having showcased many musicians who made their first records as sidemen for him: Horace Silver, Clifford Brown, Grant Green, Blue Mitchell, Donald Byrd, Horace Parlan, and others.  After also making some excellent recordings for Cadet and Argo Records in the early 60s, Lou’s return to Blue Note in 1967 was marked by one of his most famous recordings, Alligator Boogaloo. Lou was awarded an honorary Doctorate of Letters by North Carolina A & T University and a scholarship was established in his name that is awarded to the most gifted jazz musician at North Carolina A & T University each year. He was inducted into the International Jazz Hall of Fame, is an NEA Jazz Master — the nation’s highest honor in jazz, and is the recipient of countless other honors and awards for his outstanding contributions to jazz, America’s “classical music.”

Lou was born in Badin, North Carolina on November 1, 1926 — the second of 4 children born to father Andrew, a minister and graduate of Livingstone College, and mother, Lucy, graduate of Cheney University who was a teacher, music director and concert pianist who recognized Lou’s expert ear for music and introduced him to the clarinet. He matriculated to North Carolina A& T College at age 15 where he received a Bachelor of Science degree and joined the marching band playing clarinet. After being drafted into the US Navy in 1945, Lou played in the Great Lakes Navy Band where, when playing for dances, he would also play the alto saxophone. After going into Chicago several times, he heard of Charlie Parker and, after checking him out, decided that this was the style of playing he would make…..Read More

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Just to get an "Idea," this is the music that broadcasts on Jazz Con Class Radio and just played now, ENJOY IT!!!!!Horace Silver "The Outlaw'" Live at Newport '58 Louis Smith (trumpet) Junior Cook (tenor saxophone) Horace Silver (piano) Gene Taylor (bass) Louis Hayes (dru... ... See MoreSee Less

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SaturdayJazzShowLogoThis here is an announcement for the Jazz Con Class Radio listeners and just another example/reason why this Jazz broadcast is internationally known! I will be adding another time slot for the five-hour “Saturday Jazz Show” which airs on Saturdays, New York Time, that is. The new added time slot will be 2 A.M. and will run until 7 A.M. I know, not the most convenient time for New Yorkers and the better half of the United States but perfect for other countries on the other side of this planet, in which we all live on. This Jazz presentation will repeat afterwards at 1 P.M. and end at 6 P.M. New York Time. This is a big PLUS for the listeners, they will really enjoy the concoctions of real quality Jazz music that I assemble for them to enjoy. I try to tie them all up together in a sort of theme and for the specific reason of keeping the listeners preoccupied and entertained. I change the playlist every week so the listeners never get bored and disinterested. Checkout the Playlist main page and also checkout the Schedule link where these playlists live. I want to thank all the listeners of Jazz Con Class Radio who tune in regularly and share its existence with other that would be interested in the great art form of Jazz music. Although I have a great selection of classic/traditional Jazz broadcasting at 24 hours a day, it is still very challenging. The listeners are are gourmet Jazz lovers with a considerable amount knowledge concerning these legendary musicians. Very challenging indeed and sure keeps me aware and alert as well. High quality is in constant demand, so the broadcast must deliver the goods! Enjoy and if you have any feedback, you can either use the comment section below or send me a message here. Thank you for listening!

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Just to get an "Idea," this is the music that broadcasts on Jazz Con Class Radio and just played now, ENJOY IT!!!!!Horace Silver "The Outlaw'" Live at Newport '58 Louis Smith (trumpet) Junior Cook (tenor saxophone) Horace Silver (piano) Gene Taylor (bass) Louis Hayes (dru... ... See MoreSee Less

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LesterYoungCoolArticle

It was Lester Young who first coined the word “Cool” into the world of music and it sure caught on! It was Lester’s way to express his approval and/or his appreciation to a particular tune and/or a particular artist. “The Pres,” as Lestor Young was also known, worked very hard along with his fellow Jazz musicians to set a high bar for those who followed. They established a concrete/solid representation of the word “Cool” and made it stick! Its all about originality and creativity, those are the main components of being “Cool.” Jazz musicians set the standard and responsibly backed it up with their uncanny ability to play their instruments in their own unique style

The power of improvisation clearly separates a great musician from an ordinary good musician, there’s simply no place to hide. Jazz musicians are allowed to, or to be more exact, they are encouraged to play as they feel, in their own individual manner and with no time limit place upon them. As a result of this, you get a scenario where multiple “Cool” musicians are playing a particular tune together but improvising on their own terms and with no time restraint. Its amazing to hear all the improvising between the musicians, how they do it without stepping on each other. Of course for this to work, the musicians must have the discipline and the utmost respect for each other in order to freely orchestrate their own version of any particular song. Jazz music actually had a difficult time when it began, as music aficionados did not consider it to be original music. You see, the Jazz musicians would take a standard song and improvise it in their own manner. This type of performing a song is called a “Jam Session” and as we all know, Jazz musicians invented this form of playing. This is what Jazz music is all about, so if you are a newcomer, this is what you must understand. You must give it a chance and you will love it!

Here’s Miles Davis with John Coltrane, Cannonball Adderley, Bill Evans, Paul Chambers and Jimmy Cobb , playing “All Blues.”:

A musical atmosphere of this magnitude puts enormous pressure on any musician involved, as they must be really talented to keep up. But in the same respect, if they are willing to adjust to a more free form technique of playing, then they will substantially improve to a point where they master their instrument to the fullest. The end result of recording music in a Jam Session styled manner is a “One-Time” unique version of a specific song and with no specific time restriction placed on it. This works as well for the listeners, as they are immensely rewarded with the highest quality of music, its a Win-Win situation! That’s what Jazz music brings to the table and no other genre of music can do so.

Here’s a great example of a “Live” recording that was made in 1964 by Charles Mingus and company:

What an honor to be exposed to such quality music, wow! Jazz musicians were very anti-establishment for the music industry and always will be. Listen to those Jazz “Cats” they’re playing a jam session and the song is 10 minutes long, lol! That’s why Jazz fanatics are so “Cool” themselves, they understand how privileged they are to have the opportunity to hear such innovative musicians. Not to mention, they can tell immediately how good a musician is because they heard the best! It doesn’t get any “Cooler” than this folks!

There is a troubling problem though and its having access to it. For this particular reason I started Jazz Con Class Radio, choose which way you would like to hear the broadcast and enjoy it!

ColtranePrestigeJazzIsTheCoolistPost

Although the word “Cool” has expanded outside of music, its level of gratification still remains “Cool.” By the way, “The Prez” also coined the words “Hip,” “Homeboy,” “Crib,” “Dig” and many more. Here’s more Jazz terminology which you probably use on a daily basis and probably were not aware of. Jazz is definitely the “Coolist!

PrezHomageToLesterYoung

Here a  “COOL” tribute to Lester Young by Jamie Reid and with poetic justice: “Prez: A Homage to Lester Young.”  Order it from the publisher, Oolichan Books, more:

P.O. Box 2278 (250) 423-6113
Fernie, B.C. VOB 1M0 info@oolichan.com

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The1954ParisSessionsCover

Here a great compilation album that contains three separate recordings, all featuring pianist Henri Renaud and from the Vogue Record Label. I purchased it through Amazon, check here.

There are 19 songs altogether, here’s the breakdown:

ParisSessions1954PostImages

Tracks 1-6 (The Roy Haynes Sextet):  Tracks 1 to 5 recorded in Paris on October 26, 1954
Track 6 recorded in Paris on October 28, 1954. One could get this album (Roy Haynes Modern Group) separately. It features Baritone Saxophone – Jay Cameron, Bass – Joe Benjamin, Drums – Roy Haynes, Guitar – Jimmy Gourley, Piano – Henri Renaud and on Tenor Saxophone – Barney Wilen. More on this album here.

Tracks 7-13 (The Rene Thomas Quintette): Recorded in Paris on May 5, 1954. Only the first seven tracks appear on this CD, you don’t get it all, sorry. You can get the whole album here (MP3, Euro). This album features,  Bass – Jean-Marie Ingrand, Drums – Jean-Louis Viale, Guitar – René Thomas, Piano – Henri Renaud, Trumpet – Buzz Gardner

Tracks 14-19 (Frank Foster Quartet): Recorded in Paris on April 4, 1954, here’s more on the album. The album features Frank Foster -Tenor, Henri Renaud – Piano, Jean-Louis Viale – Drums, Jean-Marie Ingrand – Bass.

Here are Liner Notes from the CD, translated into English:

ParisSessions1954AlbumExcerpt

By the way, if you are interested in purchasing the “Jazz On Vogue The Perfect Collection: 35 Original Albums,” check over here.

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