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“Soul Stirrin'” is a great album from a great trombone player, Bennie Green. It was recorded in 1958 and when hundreds of legendary Jazz recordings were being produced. Unfortunately because of this, he was not mentioned as much as he should have. He produced a smooth and clear rounded sound and with no effort involved. Not to mention, he could sing as well and does on this particular album. Great album, take a good look at the recordings he made as a leader and was a major part of as a sideman here. and find out more. ENJOY!

About the album:

Soul Stirrin’ is an invigorating, exciting date from trombonist Bennie Green, showcasing his wide range of skills. His tone is alternately boisterous and reflective — the juxtaposition of the wildly swinging “We Wanna Cook” (complete with shouted vocals) and the gentle “That’s All” is startling, demonstrating that Green can vary his robust sound according to the occasion. Green’s fluid trombone is at the center stage throughout most of Soul Stirrin’, but he also steps aside to shine some light on his extraordinary support group — saxophonists Gene Ammons and Billy Root, pianist Sonny Clark, bassist Ike Isaacs and drummer Elvin Jones. Each musician plays….Read More

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Biography of Bennie Green (Jazz.com):

Trombonist Bennie Green kept pace with the innovations of bebop while maintaining a deep closeness to the blues and popular song. His style combines a bright, full sound with sharp articulation and clarity in the upper register, reminiscent of his idol, Trummy Young, with the bebop phrasing and chromaticism later perfected by J.J. Johnson.

As his style matured, Green strayed from his fellow beboppers in that his repertoire maintained a relative harmonic simplicity, considered by some to be closer to rhythm ‘n’ blues than the modern jazz played by many of his contemporaries in the late 1950s and early 1960s. Green was at his most effective playing medium and up-tempo pieces, where his bright sound and fluid articulation, always “in the pocket,” contributed to an infectious, hard-driving swing.

Bernard Green was born on April 16, 1923 in Chicago, to a family of musicians. His older brother Elbert had played with trumpeter Roy Eldridge in the local Chicago scene, and both attended DuSable High School, a hotspot for music education at the time. It was under the direction of his music teacher at DuSable where Bennie began to study trombone.

Green augmented what he learned in the school band by copying Trummy Young and Lawrence Brown and solos off of Jimmy Lunceford and Duke Ellington records. He later stated that in his formative years, “Trummy is one of the guys that used to impress me the most. He and Lawrence Brown and J. C. Higginbotham.”

Upon graduating from DuSable in 1941, Green made a name for himself playing locally in Chicago before Budd Freeman recommended him to fill a vacancy in the Earl Hines band in the summer of 1942. His arrival preceded that of two other important members, trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie and saxophonist Charlie Parker, by only a few months.

Sitting directly in front of Gillespie on the bandstand, Green couldn’t help but listen to the musical innovations Dizzy was working on at the time. Although he didn’t understand all of Dizzy’s new musical ideas, Green enjoyed listening to them and befriended Gillespie…Read More

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