From the monthly archives: "November 2014"

Jaki Byard was one of the best Jazz pianist ever but as rarely spoken of. He was a very intricate part of Mingus’ studio and live recordings during the 60’s. This made him a very key musician during the early Avant-Garde movement, he was in high demand and he was part of many classic albums. While all this was going on he formed his own groups and recorded great album including these two that are featured here. Here we have both the 1964 “Out Front” and the 1967 “On the Spot” albums. These two albums and any other album Jaki Byard has any association with are considered classics. To learn more about, please check his biography below his image at the bottom of this post. Enjoy!

OutFrontCover

About the album:

Digitally remastered by Phil De Lancie (1994, Fantasy Studios, Berkeley, California). Although Jaki Byard was a very eclectic pianist, this is a surprisingly conventional set. On most selections he is joined by bassist Bob Cranshaw and drummer Walter Perkins (in 1964) for fairly straight-ahead renditions of standards and obscurities. A few of the numbers add Booker Ervin on tenor and trumpeter Richard Williams, and of these by far the most original performance is the episodic “European Episode.” Rounding off the set is…..Read More

OnTheSpotCover

About the album:

Digitally remastered by Kirk Felton (1999, Fantasy Studios, Berkeley, California). This album mostly features pianist Jaki Byard (who plays alto on “A-Toodle-oo, Toodle-oo”) with a quartet comprised of trumpeter Jimmy Owens, bassist Paul Chambers and drummer Billy Higgins in 1967. With a repertoire stretching from “I Fall In Love Too Easily” and the boppish “Second Balcony Jump” to “GEB Piano Roll” and even “Alexander’s Ragtime Band,” the music serves as a perfect outlet for Jaki Byard’s eclectic talents; a highlight is the Byard-Chambers duet “P.C. Blues.” The recording is rounded off by a….Read More

JakiByardImageBio

Biography of Jaki Byard:

A musician that has spanned the generations of Jazz is Jaki Byard. Jaki Byard was born John Arthur Byard, Jr. on June 15, 1922 in Worcester, Massachusetts. His father was a member of the marching hands at the turn of the 20th century and played the trombone. His mother played the piano for the African Methodist Episcopalian Zion Church (AME). His maternal grandmother played the piano for the silent picture shows (visual movies without sound before “talking movies” were invented). It was on that piano that Jaki began his musical odyssey. When he was 8 years old, he started taking piano lessons from a piano teacher named Grace Johnson. The swing rhythm of the time and the lure of the big bands inspired Jaki throughout most of his career.

At the age of 16, he played his first professional engagement. During WW II, Jaki was drafted into the army, but with luck and circumstance, he was able to join the army along with Earl Bostic, with whom he would later form a musical alliance with.

By the time he was in his late-thirties, Jaki had a recording contract with Prestige records who engaged him in many recording sessions which allowed him the freedom to have his own compositions heard. It was also around this time that he performed with Charles Mingus as part of an ensemble that featured among its players many fabulous musicians: Eric Dolphy, Jack De Johnette, Johnny Coles and Bobby Jones, who toured Europe and made some great sounds and history. During the 1960’s, he saw great success, and all of his albums received mostly 3-4 star ratings in DownBeat magazine. In 1966, he won the Down Beat Jazz Poll Award for most promising musician of that year. In 1979, his 21-piece big band, The Apollo Stompers was voted the Best House Band in New York City while playing at Ali’s Alley, a club in downtown New York. On his own, Jaki was to win numerous awards and citations for his music and contributions to teaching and dance from many major academic institutions…….Read More

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Here’s an amazing album from Zoot Sims named “Americans Swinging in Paris” that was recorded in 1956 but released in 2005. Very enjoyable music and from musicians (besides Sims) that are among the best but not household names. If you have only heard Zoot Sims a few times, this album will help you pay more attention to the quality of playing from this man and will force you to hear him more often. If you already recognize the ability of Zoot Sims then you probably have already placed him high up there on your personal list of best jazz tenors ever! Here’s the lineup: Bass – Benoit Quersin, Drums – Charles Saudrais,  Piano – Henri Renaud, Tenor Saxophone – Zoot Sims Trumpet – Jon Eardley (tracks: 1 to 3, 5 to 7.) Find out more about this album from Discogs, great source! ENJOY!

About the album:

American Swinging In Paris album for sale by Zoot Sims was released May 17, 2002 on the EMI Music Distribution label. Subtitled – The Brother. American Swinging In Paris buy CD music Import exclusive compilation, ‘Americans Swinging in Paris’ is a seven track collection recorded in 1956 featuring various Read More

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More on Henri Renaud (From the Jazzwax Blog):

Clamart is a French town about five miles southwest of Paris. Each year since 1949, a jazz festival has been held there. In June 1951, soprano saxophonist Sidney Bechet was injured in a car accident on his way to the festival and was replaced by Don Byas. Also at the festival was French pianist Henri Renaud with his sextet.

Fortunately for us, the festival’s producer had invited the owner of Saturne Records. He dragged the group off to a studio and recorded them after their performance. Renaud’s band featured Bobby Jaspar (ts), Sandy Mosse (ts), Jimmy Gourley (g), Pierre Michelot (b) and Pierre Lemarchand (d). Saturne recorded them together and broke them up into small groups for the date……..Learn More

Final Update 11/17, 11 P.M. (EDT): Jazz Con Class Radio can be opened from iTunes Internet Radio Directory under the genre of “Jazz.” Please look at the others ways to connect to the stream in the prior updates, including inside the main iTunes Radio Directory. To get the full details go to this post of all the different ways to enjoy Jazz Con Class Radio. Thank you for your patience and  enjoy!

If you need help or have any questions email me through the FEEDBACK LINK.

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LATEST UPDATE 11/15 on 2A.M.(EDT) You can listen to Jazz Con Class Radio on your iTunes portal, JUST CLICK ON THIS LINK and/or  THIS LINK on image like the one above and choose “OPEN”  and choose “iTunes” to open it, These two link will open in your iTunes portal and the music will start playing, very simple! If you want to listen to the station directly through the iTunes portal and click on the “Jazz” genre, then you will have to wait a couple more days. I’m sorry but I have no control over the speed in which iTunes Internet Radio work

If you need help or have any questions email me through the FEEDBACK LINK.

UPDATE 11/12, 12:00 (EDT) Tunein Radio listeners can tune-in here. iTunes Internet Radio listeners still have to wait, I cannot do anything about it, they are SLOW to update. You have other alternatives, you can go directly to the Listen Now Link or/and you can tune in through both Android and iOS apps.

Original post:

I’m very sorry for the sudden stop of my SHOUTcast hosted server, I am working on the problem with them and trying to find out what exactly happened. Most importantly, I are trying to prevent it from happening any more. I the last 24 hours the server has gone down and back up again. These things happen in this environment all the times, the server temporarily goes down or breaks down completely.  I will be updating very frequently until broadcasted stream is resolved. Thank you for your patience and sorry for the inconvenience. Use the feedback link if you have any further questions concerning this issue. Thank you, Jose

ThePretidigitatorCover

Here’s a real “sleeper,” if you want to use that term. I prefer not to because this 1957 album was great when is was released back in 1957 but unfortunately was “overlooked.” “The Prestidigitator” is hard to find, not because it wasn’t available then and/or now but because George Wallington wasn’t a household name. The listeners on Jazz Con Class Radio have choice on where to hear the songs of this album because they can be found on this album, “J.R. Monterose Essential Jazz Masters” which is not available on Amazon at the moment. Great album, get it before its too late!

About the album:

Sicilian-born pianist “George Wallington” (his given name was Giacinto Figlia) had more than ethnicity in common with Dodo Marmarosa. Both men were active in the burgeoning bop scene of the early and mid-’40s, both made important contributions to the evolution of modern jazz, and both withdrew from public activity for protracted periods of time. Most importantly, both of these excellent pianists left enough great music in their wake to warrant a reappraisal of their legacies. Wallington named Mel Powell, Al Haig, and Bud Powell as his favorite contemporaries; primary influences were Art Tatum, Count Basie, and especially Earl Hines. He collaborated and consulted with Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie, Oscar Pettiford, and Max Roach during bop’s formative years; later he would befriend young Mose Allison and help him to get established as both recording artist and jazz essayist. Recorded in early April 1957 and released on the East West label the following year, Wallington’s album The Prestidigitator is an excellent example of his creative approach to the art of jazz. His quintet/quartet on this album consisted of bassist Teddy Kotick, drummer Nick Stabulas, Detroit-born tenor saxophonist J.R. Monterose, and bass trumpeter Jerry Lloyd, who sounds for all the world like a valve trombonist. Three of the seven pieces were composed by…..Read More

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Biography of George Wallington (From Scott Yanow- AllMusic.com):

George Wallington was one of the first and best bop pianists, ranking up there with Al Haig, just below Bud Powell. He was also the composer of two bop standards that caught on for a time: “Lemon Drop” and “Godchild.” Born in Sicily, Wallington and his family moved to the U.S. in 1925. He arrived in New York in the early ’40s and was a member of the first bop group to play on 52nd Street, Dizzy Gillespie’s combo of 1943-1944. After spending a year with Joe Marsala’s band, Wallington played with the who’s who of bop during 1946-1952, including Charlie Parker, Serge Chaloff, Allan Eager, Kai Winding, Terry Gibbs, Brew Moore, Al Cohn, Gerry Mulligan, Zoot Sims, and Red Rodney. He toured Europe with Lionel Hampton’s ill-fated big band of 1953, and during 1954-1960 he led groups in New York that….Read More

CrosstownCover

This album “Crosstown” is a compilation of recordings done in Van Gelder’s studio in 1955. They all took place on three separate dates, May 22nd, May 31st and September 1st and with Eddie Bert on Trombone, JR. Monterose on Tenor, Joe Puma on Guitar, Hank Jones on Piano, either Wendell Marshall or Clyde Lombardi on Bass and Kenny Clarke on Drums. A certain hit with all these greats on board! Enjoy!

About the album:

When trombonist Eddie Bert made these recordings he was at a point in his career where his playing was illustrative of all the eloquence that is representative of that many-dimensioned individual. Eddie had emerged as a major voice on his horn in 1954, when the Metronome Yearbook awarded him as one of the four “Musicians of the Year.” Eddie was one of those musicians on the Jazz scene……Read More

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Biography of Eddie Bert:

Eddie Bert had a long career in jazz and in the studios, managing to go almost unnoticed by all but his fellow musicians. A fine and flexible soloist, Bert also played a large part behind the scenes, performing his parts quite capably in orchestras. Among his early teachers were fellow trombonists Benny Morton and Trummy Young. In 1940, when he was 18, Bert joined Sam Donahue’s Orchestra, and two years later cut his first solo on record, “Jersey Bounce,” with Red Norvo’s band. Bert gigged with the orchestras of Charlie Barnet (1943) and Woody Herman, performed at a well-recorded Town Hall concert with Norvo in 1944, where he was extensively featured and, after a stint in the military, he worked during the next decade with such orchestras as Herbie Fields, Stan Kenton (1947-1948 and 1950-1951), Benny Goodman (1948-1949), Woody Herman again, and Les Elgart. From 1952-1955, Bert recorded several dates as a leader for Discovery, Savoy, Jazztone, and Trans-World, showing that he could be a personable bop-based improviser in small groups, too. He worked and recorded with Charles Mingus in late 1955, rejoined Goodman in 1957….. Learn More

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