From the monthly archives: "March 2014"

RandyWestonLiveAtTheFiveSpot

The surprise is not Randy Weston at the live Five Spot but its the addition of the great Coleman Hawkins! What a treat, having Coleman Hawkins teaming up with Kenny Dorham! Of course you have Randy Weston leading the live session and which almost didn’t take place (Read Below). “Randy Weston Live at the Five Spot” is a great classic and again, another live album. It was recorded in 1959 and when he was collaborating with young jazz musicians until his final recording in 1967, learn more here. Get this beauty!

About the album:

The scene for Randy Weston’s Open House was the Five Spot Cafe in Manhattan. The time, a rather dreary Monday in the Fall of 1959, and the setting about as wild a scene as you will ever make. The live performance recording was scheduled for that same evening, but Coleman Hawkins was somewhere high in the skies between Chicago and New York; Roy Haynes was taking a similar route through the sky from Boston, and Wilbur Little and his bass were last heard from in Washington, D.C. Finally, Melba Liston, hospitalized in California, had air-mailed her arrangements….Read More

FiveHourSpecialLogo

Starting on Wednesday March 26 the “The Wednesday Five Hour Special” will be played twice throughout the day. Now the Jazz Con Class Radio listeners who have a 12 hour time difference and are ready to go to sleep when it airs, examples (Japan, Australia, India, South Korea and many more) are going to enjoy it the same! The new addition will have this special, starting at 1AM and ending at 6AM (New York time), the other time slot stays the same, 3PM to 8PM (New York time). Basically, this almost covers the whole planet now, all the listeners will have a chance to listen to my well thought out, tailored-made presentation and which I change every single week. Enjoy!

ExtensionsCover

This extraordinary album “Extensions” was recorded in 1970 and released in 1972. It features a continuous stimulating theme, where if one were to connect all four songs together, the outcome would have no holes at all. McCoy Tyner’s continuous piano throughout the whole album is nothing more than genius and only explains how talented he is. Of course, he composed every single song and has composed so many significant others. Gary Bartz and Wayne Shorter are students of Coltrane and it shows in this epic avant Garde album. Simply beautiful, enjoy!

About the album:

This CD has an interesting combination of players. It may be the only recording to include both pianist McCoy Tyner and his successor with the John Coltrane Quartet, Alice Coltrane (who adds atmosphere with her harp). This set also matches the young altoist Gary Bartz with Wayne Shorter (doubling on tenor and soprano), who he succeeded in Miles Davis’ group, and has reunions between Shorter and bassist Ron Carter and between Tyner and drummer Elvin Jones. The all-star sextet stretches out on lengthy….Read More

WayningMomentsCover

Wow! Absolutely one of the sweetest sounding jazz albums I’ve ever heard. “Wayning Moments” was released in 1962 and features Wayne Shorter, Freddie Hubbard, pianist Eddie Higgins, bassist Jymie Merritt and drummer Marshall Thompson. The 15 songs ( 8 unique and 7 in different takes) are played with a constant smoothness, no real high pitch out-of the-ordinary swings at all. Truly sweet, enjoy!

About the album:

WAYNING MOMENTS is Wayne Shorter’s third and final release for Vee Jay, the label where he started his solo career. At this time, it was by far his most expansive release, covering a broad range of musical ground. It also expands further on Shorter’s gifts as a composer as he inches closer to the fully mature style for which he would become legendary. It is at this time, however, that we find Shorter, still a member of Art Blakey’s Jazz Messengers, coming into his own as a prime mover of the tenor saxophone in the hard bop era. Shorter is joined by fellow Messengers Freddie Hubbard and Jymie Merritt, both in excellent…..Read More

veejayrecordlabel

About Vee Jay Records:

Vee-Jay Records. In cold, hard facts, Vee-Jay was founded in Gary, Indiana in 1953 by Vivian Carter and James C. Bracken (later that year, Mr. & Mrs. Bracken), who used their first initials for the label’s name. The first song they ever recorded made it to the top ten of the national rhythm & blues charts. In a short time, Vee-Jay was the most successful black- owned record company in the United States. By 1963, they were charting records faster than some of the major labels. They were the first U.S. company to have the Beatles. In one month alone in early 1964, they sold 2.6 million Beatles singles. Two years later, the company was bankrupt.

So much for cold, hard facts. The trouble with these facts is that they really don’t tell the story. It’s not a story of a small business that becomes a giant corporation; rather, it’s the collective stories of the people involved. I talked to several of the key Vee-Jay people during January and February, 1981. What follows is their story…….Read More

TestimonialsJazzConClassRadio

I had a gentleman from Japan who sent me an email describing how much he loved the station and how he would listen to Jazz Con Class Radio when its bedtime and bath time with his newborn baby. This is the inspiration that satisfies me the most and only encourages/empowers me to push the listening experience forward onto a higher level. This is what this station is “ALL About.” If you have a testimonial please let me know and I will publish it, just go here for the simple instructions. Thank you all for tuning in!

GiantsOfJazzPosImaget

As all the Jazz Con Class Radio listeners know very well, on Tuesday I present a 3-hour jazz presentation and play it three times throughout the day. I also give the listeners the opportunity to create their own presentation so I could feature it for the world to hear. This offer is for any individual to take advantage of but also applies to a host of another jazz station to take advantage also and that’s even if that particular station plays the same vintage classic jazz you hear on Jazz Con Class Radio. I am not in competition with anyone, we all live in a big world with plenty of internet access for all of us classic jazz broadcasters to exist. For this reason and to further enrich true jazz listeners with more knowledge, I began to search the internet for other jazz stations which offer the same high quality of classic jazz that can be heard here. Not so easy as I thought, there just aren’t as many jazz stations as I thought but then again, I still need to search more. I did run into one particular station, “Giants of Jazz Radio,” that I found to be very well organized and that plays “real” classic jazz. I was also able to contact the Owner/Broadcaster of the station, Alan and became good friends with him immediately, it seems we have many things in common although we grew up in different countries, he in Ipswich, England and I in New York. That’s the great thing about jazz, it has a connoisseur type of following and passionately preserved throughout the world. Classic jazz fans understand the “pureness” in which the Blues uniquely offers. To understand JAZZ, is to be FREE and its a great feeling that nobody can take away from us! I asked Alan if he were interested in preparing a 3-hour jazz presentation for the “Super Tuesday Jazz Presentation” and he gladly agreed. So tune in and enjoy Alan’s show today, you’re going to love it!

NOTE: The “Super Tuesday Jazz Presentation” always airs on Tuesdays, from 3AM to 6AM, from 12PM to 3PM and from 8PM to 11PM (All Times are New York EDT)

JJIncCover

This classic album was recorded on on April 1st and 3rd of 1960 but was released in 1961. It features the great trombonist J.J. Johnson with legendary jazz musicians backing him up. This is a very bluesy album with plenty of soul but advanced the same time. Interesting enough and after searching around, this could be the only time that Freddie Hubbard and Clifford Jordan worked together but I could be completely off. Anyways, “J.J. Inc” is a great classic, get your hands on it, enjoy!

About the album:

Trombonist J.J. Johnson’s 1960 sextet is featured on this Columbia CD. Most notable among the sidemen is a rather young trumpeter named Freddie Hubbard on one of his first sessions; also helping out are tenor saxophonist Clifford Jordan, pianist Cedar Walton, bassist Arthur Harper and drummer Albert “Tootie” Heath. Seven of the compositions (which are joined by Dizzy Gillespie’s “Blue ‘N’ Boogie”) are Johnson’s and, although none caught on, “Mohawk,” “In Walked Horace” and “Fatback” (which is heard in two versions) are all fairly memorable. The six songs on the original LP are joined by three others from the same dates, two of which were released slightly earlier for the first time on a Johnson Mosaic box set….Read More

JJjohnson

Biography of J.J. Johnson:

J.J. Johnson was born James Louis in Indianapolis on January 22, 1924. At the age of 9, he studied piano with a church organist and became very interested in music during his second year at Crispus Attucks High School. The only school instrument available to him at the time was a baritone saxophone. J.J. played this instrument for a very short time and, at the age of fourteen, picked up the trombone, playing in the high school band as well as the brass marching band of the YMCA.
By the time he was eighteen, J.J. left home to play with Snookum Russel’s band, of which Fats Navarro was also a member. He went on to play with other legendary jazzers Benny Carter (from ’42-5), Count Basie (from ’45-6), and Illinois Jacquet (from ’47-9). The earliest recordings of J.J. are with the Benny Carter Orchestra, although he functioned only as a section player. Johnson’s first recorded solo, only twelve measures long, was with this group on the Capitol label on the track Love for Sale…..Read More

RedsGoodGrooveCover

Red’s Good Groove” is an enjoyable album in a sort of unconventional manner. I personally feel this way about of this 1962 recording because of the absence of a tenor or alto sax. I’m not saying it a rare occurrence but unusual for that era and where the availability of so many legendary tenor and alto saxophone players existed. In that respect it was kind of unusual but not at all when picking the Blue Mitchell-Pepper Adams duo on horns, this made it very workable. Not only workable but very logical by all means, because there was a similarity with Blue Mitchell and Donald Byrd’s sound. Donald Byrd was much more experienced in  working with Pepper Adams in 7 separate recordings, they compromised themselves perfectly. The Donald Byrd-Pepper Adams was the best trumpet-baritone sax combination ever in the history of jazz but Blue Mitchell filled in perfectly! This is just another excellent example of how talented jazz musicians are and how important it is to have the freedom to improvise whenever you like. As for Pepper Adams, his greatness was in how he managed to tame the rugged sound of the baritone sax. Although he always maintained the loudness level rather high, he had the gift of placing strong emphasis on the emotional feeling it took to make a balled honestly heartfelt and the great coolness it took to make a groove tune truly “groove.” Let’s not forget the rest of the band with of course, Red Garland on the piano and another great Bass-Drums combination, Sam Jones and Philly Jo Jones. This album should have the word great in its title, instead of good, enjoy!

About the album:

Although this is a one time studio blowing session, things obviously gelled quickly for everyone as they got underway on this 1962 recording by Red Garland, which features both Blue Mitchell and Pepper Adams in prominent supporting roles. The pianist gets things off on the right foot with his relaxed blues “Red’s Good Groove,” while Mitchell, who had already recorded a number of dates as a leader himself, delivers a confident yet understated trumpet solo. Baritone saxophonist Pepper Adams contributed the oddly named “Excerent!” (a title which somewhat puzzled the original liner note writer Peter Drew but likely refers to the tendency of some Orientals to substitute the letter “r” for “l,” long before such humor would be considered politically incorrect and unlikely to appear on a CD jacket), it’s a hard bop tune that isn’t the least bit reminiscent of the Far East. The core of the date consists of several….Read More

 

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