From the monthly archives: "June 2013"

BandwidthStatExampleImage

I would like to apologize to the Jazz Con Class Radio listeners for the short interruption of the broadcast stream this mourning (New York City Time Zone). The purpose for restarting the server was so the listeners could further benefit. Since Apple announced the revamping of iTune Radio and its integration with iMatch, the amount of listeners have increased and Jazz Con Class Radio has been exposed to 50% more Jazz enthusiasts/curious music lovers. The bandwidth has been stretched from 1-50 concurrent listeners to 1-100 concurrent listeners. Which means that up to 100 unique listeners could clearly be listening to the broadcast at the “same time.” This is great news for me especially and rectifies all the hard work I have done for the past 18 months but most importantly, it helps keep the great music of Jazz alive for the world to listen. This expansion will benefit all the current regular listeners and all the future followers, the least I want  to do is stop anyone from listening. It’s not easy to achieve instant success with a Jazz station of this type on the internet but I rather work my way up slowly and at the same time, take advantage of all the new technology that is emerging constantly. There sure is plenty of work ahead of me but the future looks great!! As long as I continue to provide the Jazz Con Class Radio listeners with the best traditional/classic Jazz available, then WE will all win! I want to thank all the current regular listeners that have supported this Jazz station from the beginning and gladly will stretch the bandwidth as much as it takes for all future listeners to enjoy!

This section of my listener stats is the most important to me and which prompted me to add more bandwidth:

JazzConClassListenersGraph

First of all, these numbers are based on a 30-day period (the Last 30 days).

That’s a total of 8626 sessions (Connections to the broadcast). Divided by 30 day equals 287 connections to the broadcast/day. An average of ONE hour per session (60.6) means the listeners are enjoying the music.

5792 Unique listeners, means that out of the 8626 connections to the broadcast, about 67% are new listeners, the other 33% (2,834 listeners) are repeat listeners in the last 30 days.

As for total unique countries (116 countries), this shows the range of potential Jazz Con Class Radio has and its possibility to improve further. Not to mention, 116 unique countries also shows the interest of Jazz music around the world.

Note: These numbers are increasing on a daily basis.

TraneingInCover

John Coltrane is almost never mentioned concerning his involvement with Red Garland and his trio. Coltrane recorded 5 albums with Red Garland and they were all great. All of these albums were on the mellow side and this one is no exception. All these albums are scattered throughout the Jazz Con Class Radio rotation and located in their respective playlist. I have actually featured one of the albums completely before, “Soul Junction.” This particular album here, “Traneing In” will be featured also in its entirety and for a couple of weeks, check the schedule link for play times, enjoy!

About the album:

With this session, recorded in the summer of 1957, John Coltrane came out from behind the harmonic safety net of a three-horn frontline to focus on his own imposing gifts as an improviser. As the only horn on TRANEING IN, the young tenor giant revels in the spotlight, demonstrating some of the hard-won lessons from his long apprenticeship with Thelonious Monk’s group that very summer at New York’s Five Spot club. Red Garland basks in the cruise-control cool of the Art Taylor/Paul Chambers rhythm team on the title tune, and his jaunty opening chords serve to italicize this blues’ deep, deep groove. When Coltrane enters, the rhythm section ups the ante, from Basie-esque tippling to a driving testimonial. Coltrane’s dense harmonic variations unwind in nervous, compulsive layers of sound. Yet for all his complexity, a fervent preacher’s cry remains at the heart of his every utterance. After a stunning Chambers solo, Garland returns with intricate Bud Powell-like variations and stately, driving block chords which incite Coltrane to further melodic delirium. Typical of his other Prestige dates, Coltrane carefully contrasts edgy moments of tension……Learn More

ListenLiveForPosts

SweetsCover

How Sweets it is! This complete album feature is all about Harry “Sweets” and his orchestra. This 1956 recording was Sweets 2nd album and features the great Ben Webster on tenor. A great album to introduce a novice Jazz Con Class listener to Sweets bluesy trumpet sound. “Sweets” will be featured for a week or so, check the schedule link for play times.

About the album:

Neither an innovator nor an iconoclast, trumpeter Harry “Sweets” Edison is simply one of the bluesiest, hardest-swinging, and downright tastiest jazz musicians of the 20th century. A consummate sideman who worked steadily throughout his career (even getting gigs recording soundtracks in the ’50s), Edison created music that always reflected his journeyman aesthetic and unerring sense of swing. Recorded in 1956, Sweets is one of the quintessential Edison albums showcasing the former Count Basie bandmember at the height of his abilities with a stellar ensemble of other Basie-ites, including tenor saxophonist Ben Webster, guitarist Barney Kessel, pianist Jimmy Rowles, bassist Joe Mondragon, and drummer Alvin Stoller. Rolling from blues to standards and back to blues, the album is a…Read More

HarrySweetsEdisonImageBio

Biography of Harry “Sweets” Edison:

Harry “Sweets” Edison got the most mileage out of a single note, like his former boss Count Basie. Edison, immediately recognizable within a note or two, long used repetition and simplicity to his advantage while always swinging. He played in local bands in Columbus and then in 1933 joined the Jeter-Pillars Orchestra. After a couple years in St. Louis, Edison moved to New York where he joined Lucky Millinder and then in June 1938, Count Basie, remaining with that classic orchestra until it broke up in 1950. During that period, he was featured on many records, appeared in the 1944 short Jammin’ the Blues and gained his nickname “Sweets” (due to his tone) from Lester Young. In the 1950s, Edison toured with……..Read More

ListenLiveForPosts

JiveAtFiveCover

Here’s a great album of Joe Newman with Frank Wess in a “showcase” manner so the Jazz Con Class listeners can get an idea of the talent behind these two Jazz musicians. The name of this 1960 album is “Jive at Five” and includes the great pianist Tommy Flanagan. I featured an album of Thad Jones, After Hours” here before and Frank Wess was on his primary instrument, the flute but he could play the Alto just as well as this album proves it. I will feature more of Joe Newman in the near future, meanwhile, check the schedule link for play times, enjoy!

About the album:

Originally put out on the Swingville label, this CD reissue is very much in the Count Basie vein. That fact is not too surprising when one considers that the quintet includes three members of Basie’s men: trumpeter Joe Newman, tenor saxophonist Frank Wess and bassist Eddie Jones. Joined by the complementary pianist Tommy Flanagan and drummer Oliver Jackson, Newman and his friends swing their way….Read More

JoeNewmanBioImage

Biography of Joe Newman:

Joe Newman was a superb, exciting trumpeter whose style echoed the best of Harry Edison, Dizzy Gillespie, and Thad Jones, seasoned with his own flavoring. He was among a select corps who not only enjoyed playing, but communicated that joy and exuberance in every solo. He provided high-note and upper-register antics, but functioned best doing soft, enticing melodies or engaging in mildly combative jam sessions. He was also an accomplished player in the traditional New Orleans style. Newman began his professional career with Lionel Hampton in 1942 and 1943, joining him after touring with the Alabama State Teachers College band. Newman became a member of the Count Basie orchestra in 1943, remaining until 1947…..Learn More

ListenLiveForPosts

MainStemCover

Here’s a well constructed energetic album by Oliver Nelson and company. Nelson again and he does in many of his album, plays both the Tenor and Flute. “Main Stem” will excite all the Jazz Con Class listeners and will put a smile on their face. I recommend to raise the volume of your speakers to get the full effect. Joe Newman is great on the trumpet and my next featured album will be one of his. Check the schedule link for play times, enjoy!

About the album:

Unlike most of Oliver Nelson’s recordings, this one has the feel of a jam session. A CD reissue of a Prestige set, Nelson (on tenor and alto) teams up with trumpeter Joe Newman (in exciting form), pianist Hank Jones, bassist George Duvivier, drummer Charlie Persip and Ray Barretto on congas for two superior standards (“Mainstem” and “Tangerine”) and four of Nelson’s more basic originals. The spirited solos of Nelson and Newman are strong reasons to get this colorful session……..Read More

ListenLiveForPosts

HubTonesCover

The early 60’s is where you could hear tiny little hints of Avant-Garde in Hard Bop and most often when Herbie Hancock was behind the piano. Hard Bop was still in full swing and this album is certainly no exception but different elements were slowly being introduced. Let’s not forget Free Jazz was in full swing also (since 1958), so something was trickling in from somewhere already. “Hub-Tones” is considered Freddie Hubbard’s signature album as you will read below and will prove itself to the Jazz Con Class listeners. Personally, I feel “Ready for Freddie” (1961) was where he proved to me that he can be an ultimate band leader. Either way, you can’t lose! Check the schedule link for play times, enjoy!

About the Album:

The Rudy Van Gelder Edition of HUB-TONES includes an essay by Bob Digitally remastered using 24-bit technology by Rudy Van Gelder (1998, Van Gelder Studio, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey). This is part of the Blue Note Rudy Van Gelder Editions series. Freddie Hubbard’s HUB-TONES, a consummate Blue Note date from the early ’60s, is the trumpeter’s most highly acclaimed disc. Hubbard fronts a standard quintet here, with fine support from James Spaulding, Herbie Hancock, Reggie Workman, and Clifford Jarvis. The trumpeter’s style is more clearly defined than on past efforts with a signature approach that Hubbard would continue throughout the remainder of the hard bop era. Indeed, this particular session signaled Hubbard’s arrival as one of the giants of the trumpet and a leader of modern jazz. Significantly, HUB-TONES establishes Hubbard as a masterful composer as well as an interpreter of standards. The opening “You’re My Everything” is one of the latter, but the remainder of the cuts are Hubbard’s. The lightly swinging “Prophet Jennings” features a muted melody accompanied by Spaulding’s delicate flute. The classic title track……Read More

ListenLiveForPosts

GoneWithGolson

The Jazz Con Class Radio listeners will literally “be gone” with Benny Golson after listening to this downright superb album. The greatness lies within this unmatchable combination of Curtis Fuller and Golson as they play together in perfect unison. Great take on all the songs, including a great version of  “Autumn Leaves. Gone with Golson” will be featured for a week or so, check the schedule link for play times.

About the album:

Digitally remastered by Phil De Lancie (1994, Fantasy Studios, Berkeley, California). Like its same-year companion GROOVIN’ WITH GOLSON, 1959’s GONE WITH GOLSON pairs composer/arranger/saxophonist Benny Golson with trombonist Curtis Fuller (shortly after this release, the two formed the Jazztet with Art Farmer). Like GROOVIN’, GONE offers solid hard-bop fare with an aura of elegance and relaxation. Golson’s breathy tone on the tenor qualifies the mellow, in-the-cut vibe here, which is not to say the set doesn’t cook. Both Golson and Fuller (whose extremely precise trombone technique distinguishes him from most players) blow mightily through rhythmically and harmonically complex lines, yet manage keep the whole at a sophisticated reserve. Fuller contributes one of his own compositions (the smoothly swinging “A Bit of Heaven”), which fits nicely alongside Golson’s three originals (the smoky “Blues After Dark,” “Soul Me,” which pushes beyond standard gospel-derived soul-jazz, and the up-tempo “Jam for Bobbie”)……Read More

BennyGolsonImage

Biography of Benny Golson:

Benny Golson is a talented composer/arranger whose tenor playing has continued to evolve with time. After attending Howard University (1947-1950) he worked in Philadelphia with Bull Moose Jackson’s R&B band (1951) at a time when it included one of his writing influences, Tadd Dameron on piano. Golson played with Dameron for a period in 1953, followed by stints with Lionel Hampton (1953-1954), and Johnny Hodges and Earl Bostic (1954-1956). He came to prominence while with Dizzy Gillespie’s globetrotting big band (1956-1958), as much for his writing as for his tenor playing (the latter was most influenced by Don Byas and Lucky Thompson). Golson wrote such standards as “I Remember Clifford” (for the late Clifford Brown), “Killer Joe,” “Stablemates,” “Whisper Not,” “Along Came Betty,” and “Blues March” during 1956-1960. His stay with Art Blakey’s Jazz Messengers (1958-1959) was significant, and during 1959-1962 he co-led the Jazztet with Art Farmer. From that point on Golson gradually drifted away from jazz and concentrated more on working in the studios and with orchestras including spending a couple of years in Europe (1964-1966). When Golson returned to active playing in 1977, his tone had hardened and sounded much closer to Archie Shepp than to Don Byas…..Read More

ListenLiveForPosts

OutOfTheBlueCover

Blue Mitchell, another great unappreciated Jazz trumpeter is joined by an all-star cast of greats. This 1959 Hard Bop album was only Mitchell’s 2nd but first significant one because it featured the legendary Benny Golson and Art Blakey on drums. Golson added that unique soft flavor while Blakey pounding his distinctive signature beat. Its basically a mellow album for the Jazz Con Class listeners to enjoy in a comfortable atmosphere. It is only when Golson plays, that it picks up in volume but again, with that sweet tone which he and a few others (Coleman Hawkins, Johnny Hodges, Lester Young…etc) could only produce. “Out of the Blue” is a real classic that somehow got away. It will be featured for a week or so in its entirety, so don’t miss it! Check the schedule link for play times.

About the album:

Digitally remastered by Phil De Lancie (1991, Fantasy Studios, Berkeley, California). This early recording by Blue Mitchell finds the distinctive trumpeter in excellent form in a quintet also featuring tenor saxophonist Benny Golson (who contributed “Blues on My Mind”), either Wynton Kelly or Cedar Walton on piano, Paul Chambers or Sam Jones on bass and drummer Art Blakey. The consistently swinging repertoire includes a surprisingly effective version of “When the Saints Go Marching In.” “Studio B,” recorded in the same period but formerly available only in a sampler, has been added to the program…..Read More

BlueMitchellBioImage

Biography of Blue Mitchell:

Owner of a direct, lightly swinging, somewhat plain-wrapped tone that fit right in with the Blue Note label’s hard bop ethos of the 1960s, Blue Mitchell tends to be overlooked today perhaps because he never really stood out vividly from the crowd, despite his undeniable talent. After learning the trumpet in high school — where he got his nickname — he started touring in the early ’50s with the R&B bands of Paul Williams, Earl Bostic, and Chuck Willis before returning to Miami and jazz. There, he attracted the attention of Cannonball Adderley, with whom he recorded for Riverside in 1958. That year, he joined the Horace Silver Quintet, with whom he played and recorded until the band’s breakup in March 1964, polishing his hard bop skills. During his Silver days, Mitchell worked with tenor Junior Cook, bassist Gene Taylor, drummer Roy Brooks, and various pianists as a separate unit and continued recording as a leader for Riverside……Read More

css.php