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Another great album comprised of superstars but what makes it even more interesting, is the combination of Herbie Mann and Charlie Rouse. They compliment each other very well, taking turns and advancing the song forward in a sweet fashion. This album, “Just Wailin’” was released in 1958 and sounds like something from the mid 60’s. Everyone does get a piece of the action but what glues it all together is when Mann and Rouse join in, outstanding! The listeners here at Jazz Con Class will have a blast with this album feature, check the schedule link for play times.

About the album:

This CD reissue of an earlier Prestige LP emphasizes (but does not stick exclusively to) the blues. The sextet has impressive players in flutist Herbie Mann, Charlie Rouse on tenor, guitarist Kenny Burrell, pianist Mal Waldron, bassist George Joyner and drummer Art Taylor. The material (originals by Waldron, Burrell and Calvin Massey, in addition to a brief “Jumpin’ With Symphony Sid”) is reasonably challenging…The straight-ahead jam session has its strong moments, and as long as one doesn’t let their expectations get out of hand, the music…..Read More

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More on Herbie Mann (Biography):

Herbie Mann played a wide variety of music throughout his career. He became quite popular in the 1960s, but in the ’70s became so immersed in pop and various types of world music that he seemed lost to jazz. However, Mann never lost his ability to improvise creatively as his later recordings attest. Herbie Mann began on clarinet when he was nine but was soon also playing flute and tenor. After serving in the Army, he was with Mat Mathews’ Quintet (1953-1954) and then started working and recording as a leader. During 1954-1958 Mann stuck mostly to playing bop, sometimes collaborating with such players as Phil Woods, Buddy Collette, Sam Most, Bobby Jaspar, and Charlie Rouse. He doubled on cool-toned tenor and was one of the few jazz musicians in the ’50s who recorded on bass clarinet; he also recorded a full album in 1957 (for Savoy) of unaccompanied flute. After spending time playing and writing music for television, Mann formed his Afro-Jazz Sextet, in 1959, a group using several percussionists, vibes (either Johnny Rae, Hagood Hardy, or Dave Pike) and the leader’s flute. He toured Africa (1960) and Brazil (1961), had a hit with “Comin’ Home Baby,” and recorded with Bill Evans. The most popular jazz flutist during the era, Mann explored bossa nova (even recording in Brazil in 1962), incorporated music from many cultures (plus current pop tunes) into his repertoire, and had among his sidemen such top young musicians as Willie Bobo, Chick Corea (1965), Attila Zoller, and Roy Ayers; at the 1972 Newport Festival his sextet included David Newman and Sonny Sharrock. By then Mann had been a producer at Embroyo (a subsidiary of Atlantic) for three years and was frequently stretching his music outside of jazz. As the ’70s advanced, Mann became much more involved in rock, pop, reggae, and even disco. After leaving Atlantic at the end of the ’70s, Mann had his own label for awhile and gradually came back to jazz……Learn More

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