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BlueAndSentimentalCover

This 1961 album was a beautifully mellow and completely embraces its title. “Blue and Sentimental” should appropriately be heard in a relaxed environment or maybe when one is looking for a way to rest their mind after a long, crazy day. That’s the beauty of Jazz and I always said to those who asked me why I listen to this musical art form. I always answer with, “Jazz keeps me sane.” Ike Quebec played the saxophone in a straight forward gentle manner that does not, by any means, bother the ears. This album helps equip the Jazz Con Class listeners with even more of an advantage because of the addition of Grant Green, who is considered to many as the very best Jazz guitarist ever. There are a few upbeat songs in the album but Quebec and Grant keep it under control. After you listen to the whole album, you will confirm it to yourselves, it is truly, Blue and Sentimental! This album will be featured for a week or so, check the schedule link for play times, enjoy.

More on the Album:

Although not as well known as other big tenor men like John Coltrane, Hank Mobley, or Benny Golson, Ike Quebec was a major contributor to the classic era of jazz and this 1961 Blue Note date captures him in his prime. BLUE & SENTIMENTAL is indeed one of but a few discs that Quebec recorded for Blue Note, although he was involved with the legendary label as an A&R man and performed on many sessions by other artists. His huge, velvety tone and bluesy swagger are Quebec’s signature as he lopes and swings through several classic tunes like Count Basie’s lazy title track, the bouncing “That Old Black Magic,” and Cole Porter’s hauntingly melodic “It’s Alright With Me.” Filling out the quartet are no less than Grant Green, Paul Chambers, and Philly Joe Jones, Blue Note regulars all, who shine brightly as always……Read More

IkeQuebecImageBio

Biography of Ike Quebec:

“This incontestably superior musician has been almost totally ignored in the chronicling of the musical form to which he has contributed so much. Quebec was a tenor man of the Hawkins school with a big tone and firm, vigorous style. I hope this new perspective of the contribution Ike Quebec has made to jazz will help to bring a little lightness to his soul and much more recognition to his name.” Leonard Feather

An accomplished dancer and pianist, he switched to tenor sax as his primary instrument in his early 20s, and quickly earned a reputation as a promising player. His recording career started in 1940, with the Barons of Rhythm. He recorded or performed with Frankie Newton, Hot Lips Page, Roy Eldridge, Trummy Young, Ella Fitzgerald, Benny Carter and Coleman Hawkins. Between 1944 and 1951, he worked with Cab Calloway. He recorded for Blue Note records in this era, and also served as a talent scout for the label (helping pianists Thelonious Monk and Bud Powell come to wider attention) and, due to his exceptional sight reading skills, was an uncredited impromptu arranger for many Blue Note sessions……Read More

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