From the monthly archives: "March 2013"

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Here’s a very entertaining 1956 Hard Bop album named “After Hours.” It perfectly achieves the purpose of placing the listener in that familiar laid back, wee hours scenario, that only a Jazz club can offer. Listening and absorbing the special sounds from these very talented musicians. Four songs in total, two upbeat but sensually soft tunes with strong emphasis on the bass and drums. The other two songs, stylishly classy and with that certain relaxing swerving feeling of confidence behind them. You’re there, you can feel it, the mood is so ever present! That’s the beauty of Jazz, my fellow Jazz con Class listeners. Check the always reliable schedule link for play times, enjoy!

About the album:

After Hours album by Kenny Burrell / Thad Jones /Wess / Frank Wess was released Dec 05, 1991 on the Original Jazz Classics label. All tracks have been digitally remastered from original analog master tapes. After Hours songs Although Thad Jones’ name appears first on this CD reissue, pianist Mal Waldron is actually the session’s main force. After Hours album Waldron contributed all four selections (all of which are worthwhile, even if none caught on) and is a key soloist with the sextet, which also includes trumpeter Jones, Frank Wess on tenor and flute, guitarist Kenny Burrell, bassist Paul Chambers and drummer Art Taylor. After Hours CD music Fine straight-ahead music…..Read More

Photograph: Copyright of Terry Cryer

Photograph: Copyright of Terry Cryer

More on Frank Wess (Biography):

One of the first major jazz flutists, Frank Wess has also been a top Lester Young-influenced tenorman, an expert first altoist, and an occasional composer/arranger — certainly a valuable man to have around. Early on he toured with Blanche Calloway, served in the military, and had stints with Billy Eckstine Orchestra (1946), Eddie Heywood, Lucky Millinder, and R&B star Bull Moose Jackson. That was all just a prelude to Wess’ important period with Count Basie’s big band, from 1953-1964. His flute playing, so expertly utilized in Neal Hefti’s arrangements, gave the Basie Orchestra a fresh new sound, and his cool-toned tenor contrasted well with the more passionate sound of fellow tenor Frank Foster; Wess also had opportunities to play alto with the classic big band…….Learn More

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Here’s a great Hard Bop album recorded in 1956 with the Clifford Brown and Max Roach quintet. A memorable album by the dual because unknown to them at the time, it would be the last time the quintet recorded together. Clifford Brown, along with the pianist, Richie Powell (His wife also), were tragically killed in a car accident a couple of months later (June 26, 1956). This young quintet was already considered to be a heavyweight Jazz band at the time. They were shooting for the stars and were well on their way there until it abruptly ended. I wonder how they would have sounded together in the 60’s, very scary! The name of this album is “Clifford Brown and Max Roach at Basin Street” will be featured here for a week or so. It is also considered by Jazz experts, as one of the most essential Hard Bop albums ever recorded! Check the schedule link for play times, ENJOY!

About the album:

At Basin Street album by Clifford Brown / Max Roach Quintet / Max Roach was released Oct 25, 1990 on the Emarcy label. Recorded in New York, New York on January 4 and February 16, 1956. Recorded mere months before Clifford Brown died in a car crash, 1956’s AT BASIN STREET finds the revered trumpeter in top form, co-leading an ensemble with drummer Max Roach that included saxophonist Sonny Rollins and pianist Richie Powell (who was also killed in the accident). Morbid associations aside, this record is a vibrant hard-bop outing with Brown’s amazingly agile horn lines always commanding attention even when compared to Rollins’s robust sax work…..Read More

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Biography of Richie Powell:

Richie Powell (September 5, 1931 – June 26, 1956) was an American bebop jazz pianist. He was born into a musical family in New York City, and was the younger brother of Bud Powell, also a pianist. Although sometimes considered less gifted than his bebop-icon brother, he was a respected musician and was beginning to achieve recognition at the time of his death.

Richie Powell studied at City College of New York. He played in the bands of Paul Williams (1951–52) and Johnny Hodges (1952-54), and from 1954 to 1956 was a member of the group co-led by Clifford Brown and Max Roach.

In 1956, after an informal gig at a Philadelphia store called Music City, Powell and Brown were being driven overnight by Powell’s wife Nancy to an engagement in Chicago. During the dark rainy night Nancy lost control of the vehicle on the Pennsylvania Turnpike, heading for Cleveland, and in the early hours of 26 June all three occupants were killed…..Read More

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On this Tuesday March 26th there will be a Hard Bop dedicated Jazz Presentation. Normally, I create a mixed playlist that is consistent and flows together. But this one will concentrate strictly on Hard Bop and will feature Jazz from the mid to late 50’s. This treat will include Donald Byrd, Dexter Gordon, Miles, Monk, Sonny Stitt, Sonny Rollins, Lou Donaldson, Paul Gonsalves, Clark Terry and many more greats. From on now I will be covering a specific theme in my presentations. This and every “Super Tuesday Jazz Presentation” are always scheduled for three play times on every Tuesday, of course and reason being that it could be enjoyed on prime-time throughout the globe. Check the schedule link for play times. Enjoy!

Here’s Dexter Gordon:

And Sonny Rollins:

Rudy Van Gelder remastered two recording sessions with Sonny Rollins as the leader. The name of these two albums are “Sonny Rollins Volume 1” and “Sonny Rollins Volume 2.” I will feature both of these special albums but will not play all of the songs. I will take a few from each album and make sure it will be at least an hour long. After a week or so I will place all the songs from both volumes into the rotation and because of the nature of these albums, they will be placed into two separate playlists. Volume One will be in the Hard Bop and Volume 2 will be placed in the “G4” Playlist (Find out more). Volume one was organized as a complete band with members who played together with Sonny Rollins in the past. Volume two was more like a jam sessions and where you have two Jazz giant pianists, Horace Silver and Thelonious Monk, taking turns on different tunes. Sonny Rollins didn’t play with these artists regularly, it was more like a one-time occasion. Check the schedule link for play times, below are the songs I will feature and the order they will be played, ENJOY!

Tracks that will be featured:

1. (Vol. One) “Decision”  2. (Vol. One) “Plain Jane”  3. (Vol. One) “Sonnysphere”  4. (Vol. Two) “Why Don’t I”  5. (Vol. Two) “Misterioso” 6. Vol. Two) “Reflections”  7. (Vol. Two) “Poor Butterfly”

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About the Volume One album:

Sonny Rollins’ Blue Note years produced some of the quintessential recordings of the post-bop era. The simply titled VOLUME ONE is one such disc that exemplifies the classic swinging quintet format that defined small ensemble performance style from then on. Expertly recorded by the legendary Rudy Van Gelder, Rollins and his men–a young Donald Byrd (trumpet), the masterful Wynton Kelly (piano), Gene Ramey (bass) and bebop pioneer Max Roach (drums)–display expert improvisational skills on the bluesy opener “Decision” and the hard-swinging “Bluesnote.” Sounding very much like the famed Miles Davis quintet of the same period…..Read More

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About the Volume Two album:

The Rudy Van Gelder Edition of VOLUME 2 includes an essay by Bob Blumenthal. This is part of the Blue Note Rudy Van Gelder Editions series. Sonny Rollins’ VOLUME 2 for Blue Note is one of those timeless discs. It is a milestone in jazz history that gathered together some of the founding fathers of the post-bop era. Joining Rollins are Jazz Messengers Art Blakey (drums) and Horace Silver (piano), Miles Davis’ favorite bassist Paul Chambers, the quintessential trombonist J. J. Johnson and even Thelonious Monk himself. This is a swinging tour-de-force that begins with a bang and doesn’t let up until the last note has faded away. Sonny’s own up-tempo “Why Don’t I” kicks off the session with a rhythmic jolt before Rollins’ big tenor launches into a classic swinging solo followed by turns by Johnson, Silver and some heated exchanges with Blakey……Read More

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Most people who are just occasional Jazz fans do not dig in deeper into the song or album they are listening to. There’s absolutely nothing wrong with this, the love and respect for this unique brand of music, is still ever so present. It’s much different for me though and more of a challenge/necessity because of what Jazz Con Class stands for. It’s NOT Just “All that Jazz” means that you are not going to get bombarded with a mix of different eras (Example: Hard Bop Early, Jazz Funk and Free Jazz (Mixed Together) of Jazz music at the same time. I, by no means, feel that I am some kind of Jazz expert and for a matter of fact, am learning something new everyday. I enjoy this quite a bit, this investigative work and it never fails to fascinate me more, especially the musicianship behind Jazz. The more I learn, the more I have to offer here to the Jazz Con Class listeners. And this is how I learned about Horace Parlan and how much he has contributed to Jazz. This 1961 album “Up & Down” is a great example and if you read later below (Horace Parlan biography) you would see all this man has overcome to become an established Jazz pianist. This album is a great example of how Jazz derives from the Blues. Horace Parlan has a great supporting cast behind him, Booker Ervin (Tenor Saxophone), Grant Green (Guitar), George Tucker (Bass) and Al Harewood (Drums). Check the schedule link for play times, ENJOY!

About the album:

By adding guitarist Grant Green and tenor saxophonist Booker Ervin to his standard rhythm section of bassist George Tucker and drummer Al Harewood, pianist Horace Parlan opens up his sound and brings it closer to soul-jazz on 1961’s UP & DOWN. Green’s clean, graceful style meshes well with Parlan’s relaxed technique, while Ervin’s robust tone and virile attack provides a good contrast to the laid-back groove the rhythm section lays down. Stylistically, the music is balanced between hard bop and soul-jazz, tied together by the bluesy tint in the three soloists’ playing. All of the six original compositions give the band room to stretch out–not only to show off their chops, but move the music somewhat away from generic conventions and seek new territory. In other words, UP & DOWN finds Parlan at a peak and…..Read More

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Biography of Horace Parlan:

Horace Parlan (pianist) was born on January 19, 1931 in Pittsburg, Pennsylvannia.

As a child, Parlan was stricken with polio, resulting in the partial crippling of his right hand. The handicap, though, has contributed to his development of a particularly “pungent” left-hand chord voicing style, while comping with highly rhythmic phrases with the right.

Much of pianist Horace Parlan’s distinguished jazz life has been marked by an intriguing series of ebbs and flows. At times his artistry has received the attention and praise it deserves, while at others it has been curiously overlooked and neglected. All the more interesting is that amid these sometimes unnerving shifts, Parlan has remained a model of musical consistency.

Just flip through the pages of his accomplished career – between 1952 and 1957 he worked in Washington DC with Sonny Stitt and then spent two years with Charles Mingus’ Jazz Workshop, to his stellar ‘60s recordings for Blue Note, and on to his more recent work with Archie Shepp and Danish bassist Jimmi Pederson – and you’ll undoubtedly be struck by the singularity and cohesiveness of his approach.

Unlike most musicians, who study the fundamentals of their instrument before seeking out a distinctive sound and style, Parlan was compelled to address the piano from a unique direction all along. An early childhood bout with polio left his right hand partially paralyzed, forcing Parlan to compensate by developing a personal style largely reliant on the left -not only for the usual measures of accompaniment, but also to weave melodic phrases and swinging single-note runs.

Armed with this approach, Parlan left his hometown of Pittsburgh in 1957 to try his hand in the greener jazz pastures of New York. Almost immediately, he found a place in the Mingus Jazz Workshop – where he remained until 1959, playing on such seminal recordings as Blues & Roots and Mingus’ Ah Hum.

Between 1960 and 1963, Parlan went on lead a series of potent sessions for Blue Note (thankfully reissued by Mosaic Records as The Complete Blue Note Horace Parlan Sessions) – reinforcing his soulful, rhythmically inventive style…..Learn More

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Mal Waldron was an integral part of Hard Bop but later gravitated to Free Jazz. As you will read below this 1956 album “Mal-1” was the first of four with the similar title. He played with Mingus from 1954-56 and was very active throughout all the  New York City Jazz clubs.Very interesting career which ended in Munich, Germany (More on Bio below). The Jazz Con Class listeners will enjoy this very creative hard bop album, check the schedule link for play times, enjoy!

About the album:

Digitally remastered from the original analog master tapes by Phil De Lancie (1991, Fantasy Studios, Berkeley). This 1956 release was the first of Waldron’s four “Mal” titles (MAL-1, MAL-2, MAL-3, and MAL-4). At the time of these recordings Waldron was working as Billie Holiday’s accompanist–he was her piano player for the last two years of her life, and, like the legendary singer, he uses dramatic understatement rather than overt flash. This set is a mix of originals and standards. Jerome Kern’s “Yesterdays” is stripped to its core components, with the bass setting the pulse, as a solo trumpet starts the melody, slowly joined by sax and finally the whole ensemble. “Bud Study” is a perfect encapsulation…….Read More

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Biography of Mal Waldron:

Born in New York City, Waldron’s jazz work was chiefly in the hard bop, post-bop and free jazz genres. He is known for his distinctive chord voicings and adaptable style, which was originally inspired by the playing of Thelonious Monk.

After obtaining a B.A. in music from Queen’s College, New York, he worked in New York City in the early 1950s with Ike Quebec, “Big” Nick Nicholas, and rhythm and blues groups. He worked frequently with Charles Mingus from 1954 to 1956 and was Billie Holiday’s regular accompanist from 1957 until her death in 1959. He also supervised recording sessions

for Prestige Records, for which he provided arrangements and compositions (including the jazz standard “Soul Eyes”). After Holiday’s death he chiefly led his own groups……Learn More

 

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Howard McGhee was an intricate part of the Bebop movement but is hardly ever mentioned. Dizzy gets most of the recognition but McGhee along with Fats Navarro and Idrees Sulieman were equally as important. They were all a strong influence to the Hard Bop trumpeters that came afterwards. Miles was, of course, was a great part of the Bebop era but entered into the picture a few years later. As you will read later on below, McGhee was an absentee in the 50’s because of drug problems and missed most of the Hard Bop era but came back in the early 60’s. Maggie’s Back in Town!! was the first of his first return album was recorded in 1961. It will be featured here on Jazz Con Class so the listeners can learn more of how great McGhee was. There’s no way to avoid noticing how much influenced he had on the greats that came up in the early 50’s, enjoy!

About the album:

Trumpeter Howard McGhee, after spending much of the 1950s only partly active in music (due to drug problems), made a full-fledged comeback in the early ’60s only to find his bop-oriented music out of fashion. This Contemporary set (reissued on CD in the OJC series) was McGhee’s finest recording of the period, a quartet outing with brilliant pianist Phineas Newborn, bassist Leroy Vinnegar, and drummer Shelly Manne. Although tenor saxophonist Teddy Edwards is not on the date, two of his compositions (his famous “Sunset Eyes” and a tribute to the trumpeter…..Read More

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Howard McGhee biography:

6 March 1918, Tulsa, Oklahoma, USA, d. 17 July 1987, New York City, New York, USA. During the late 30s, McGhee played trumpet in several territory bands in the Midwest before moving to Detroit, where he became well known in that city’s lively jazz scene. He first enjoyed major success with Lionel Hampton in 1941; however, he quickly moved on, joining Andy Kirk, for whom he wrote arrangements and was featured soloist. Although he was to work in other big bands of the early 40s, including Charlie Barnet’s and Georgie Auld’s, McGhee soon became most closely associated with bebop. From the mid-40s he could be heard playing in clubs and on records with Charlie Parker, Fats Navarro and others. He was present on the notorious Parker recording session for Dial Records that produced ‘Lover Man’ and was, in fact, largely responsible for salvaging the session from potential disaster when Parker broke down…..Read More

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Horace Silver was a major contributor towards the Hard Bop movement in the early 5o’s. He was Art Blakey’s pianist for a couple of years before they came up with the actual name “The Jazz Messengers.” For a matter of fact, the very first album of these Jazz Messengers was actually named “Horace Silver and the Jazz Messengers” and which was previously featured here on Jazz Con Class (Check the Archives):

“A couple of years later I went into Birdland with Clifford Brown, Horace Silver, Curly Russell and Lou Donaldson for a few weeks. We made some live, unrehearsed records and they did pretty well. After that it was Horace who decided we should organize a group. He said, ‘We’ll call it the Jazz Messengers.’ So it was Horace who really put the name on it, and it stuck.” – Art Blakey, quoted by Herb Nolan in Down Beat, November 1979, p.21.

“I remember when I first met him. I used to call him ‘The Connecticut Yankee.’ We met at Birdland when he was with Stan Getz. I had broken up the 17 Messengers and when we formed the group with Horace, Hank Mobley, and Kenny Dorham, he said let’s call it the Jazz Messengers. It started out as a corporation. That didn’t work out too good. So we just went on with it. We just carried on and tried to get other musicians to play jazz and build names and get them out there because we need more groups out there to hold the joints open, the jazz joints throughout the United States. I wasn’t too successful at doing that but at least we tried and I had a ball doing it.” – Art Blakey, Radio Free Jazz, March 1977, pp.17-18

This album featured here “Horace Silver Live at Newport 58” was of course, afterwards and when he was well established already. He was in great demand, playing with many great but by 1956 was leading his own band. Silver alongside with Art Blakey followed through on the concept of discovering young talent, giving them the opportunity, increasing the demand for more talent and most importantly, continuing the tradition of Jazz. I encourage all the Jazz Con Class listeners to take some time out and learn more about Horace Silver. We all know how influential Art Blakey was but not much about Horace Silver’s enormous contributions. He was a great man, a great musician/composer and a major influence to Jazz! Checkout the schedule link for play times. This album will be placed afterwards on the “G4 Playlist”  and where almost all “Live” recordings are located, enjoy!

About the album:

The set opens with “Tippin’,” a hard swinger, then segues to “The Outlaw,” a composition in the classic Silver mode, incorporating exotic rhythms, complex melodic leads, and deep grooves. “Senor Blues,” a cool-toned blues, and “Cool Eyes,” a frenetic bop workout, are equally impressive. The tunes are extended, and feature plenty of top-flight improvisation from the musicians, making for a memorable live date worth picking up. Composer and pianist Horace Silver was one of the leading lights of the post-bop movement, and LIVE AT NEWPORT ’58 captures him in his prime. Leading a crack quintet (which includes trumpeter Louis Smith and saxophonist Junior Cook) through four slinking, swinging tunes, Silver turns in a wonderful set. Personnel: Horace Silver (piano); Junior Cook (tenor saxophone); Louis Smith (trumpet); Gene Taylor (acoustic bass); Louis Hayes (drums). Rolling Stone (p.58) – “[A] surprise from Silver’s early prime….[With] Silver leading a quintet in dynamic expansions of four tunes, including the cool brass glide and staccato-piano bite of ‘Senor Blues.'”…..Read More

As Jazz Con Class listeners already know, on every Saturday the “Contemporary Playlist” is showcased. The Jazz music on this playlist consists of mostly young aspiring artist and others who have been around but are still producing great Jazz. These artists have one thing in common in there style of play and it complies with the particular Jazz music that specifically plays here. They play traditional/classic Jazz and this playlist is named “Contemporary” because this music was recorded recently. These are a special breed of musicians who respect/admire classic/traditional Jazz and keep it current. Great music never gets old and these artists are proving it. This is a difficult task for them to prosper, in respect to the ideals of the few but very powerful music industries. It is a constant struggle for all these Jazz musicians, they need to take all sorts of different routes to obtain true recognition. Pop music dominates the billboard ratings and almost most of the times the great musicians are ignored. Maybe they are just too good or maybe they have more pride. This is why the “Contemporary Playlist” is featured here on Jazz Con Class, they belong right there with all the greats that came before them.

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This week I added Josh Maxey, a great Jazz guitarist from New York City. Here are some opinions of him:

“Josh Maxey is at the forefront of the continuing evolution of jazz and in particular the jazz guitar. In an era where there are so many truly gifted musicians, Josh stands out because of the feeling of his music and playing. His music reflects a deeper purpose and a more mature evolvement than many of the “Young Lion’s” of jazz today who garner so much media coverage. His music and playing reflect his awareness that it is not mechanics, or complexity that define great art, but the intent and awareness of the artist and the ability to reach the heart of the listener in a transformative way.”

Rodney Jones
Professional Guitarist
Professor of Jazz Guitar Studies – Juilliard School of Music
Professor of Jazz Guitar Studies – Manhattan School of Music

“Sophisticated yet demure…even sublime at times, Maxey has embodied the culture of his experiences into a captivating collection that reinvents the wheel, over and over again. This is one collection of beauty & art through jazz that will not disappoint. Even the most critical of ears will find that this is a must have.”

Cicily Janus

Author, The New Face of Jazz

Learn more about Josh by visiting his website here. Check the schedule link for play times of the “Contemporary Playlist” (Twice on Saturdays) and all the others featured playlists here on Jazz Con Class, ENJOY!

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Charles Mingus was amazing in my eyes. How ahead he was of everyone and how he stuck to his guns all his career, never giving in. Producing the Jazz he wanted and where the musicians would have total “liberty” to improvise on-the-fly. Here, in his own words, Mingus explains in great detail:

WHAT IS A JAZZ COMPOSER?

Each jazz musician when he takes a horn in his hand- trumpet, bass, saxophone, drums-whatever instrument he plays-each soloist, that is, when he begins to ad lib on a given composition with a title and improvise a new creative melody, this man is taking the place of a composer. He is saying, “listen, I am going to give you a new complete idea with a new set of chord changes. I am going to give you a new melodic conception on a tune you are familiar with. I am a composer.” That’s what he is saying.

I have noticed that there are many kinds of composers in this so-called jazz. For instance, there are musicians who simply take rhythmic patterns and very spare notes-very limited invention melodically-and play in a soulful swinging way. Some people in the audience, when asked what they think about jazz, say, “I just go by the feeling, I go by the feeling the guy gives me.” Now, whether there is feeling or not depends upon what your environment or your association is or whatever you may have in common with the player. If you feel empathy for his personal outlook, you naturally feel him musically more than some other environ-mental and musical opposite who is, in a way. beyond you.

I, myself, came to enjoy the players who didn’t only just swing but who invented new rhythmic patterns, along with new melodic concepts. And those people are: Art Tatum, Bud Powell, Max Roach, Sonny Rollins, Lester Young, Dizzy Gillespie and Charles Parker, who is the greatest genius of all to me because he changed the whole era around. But there is no need to compare composers. If you like Beethoven, Bach or Brahms, that’s okay. They were all pencil composers. I always wanted to be a spontaneous composer. I thought I was, although no one’s mentioned that. I mean critics or musicians. Now, what I’m getting at is that I know I’m a composer. I marvel at composition, at people who are able to take diatonic scales, chromatics, 12-tone scales, or even quarter-tone scales. I admire anyone who can come up with something original. But not originality alone, because there can be originality in stupidity, with no musical description of….Continue Here

The Jazz Con Class listeners should take note and probably knew already, this is the reason why I created this Internet Jazz Station. Mingus couldn’t have been any more accurate! These two albums will be featured together in order, Jazzical Moods Volume One (Tracks: What Is This Thing Called Love, Stormy Weather, Minor Intrusion, Abstractions) and then Jazzical Moods Volume Two (Tracks: Thrice Upon a Theme, Four Hands, Spur Of The Moment/Echonitus). Check the schedule link for play times, ENJOY!

About the Albums:

Jazzical Moods album by Charles Mingus was released Jan 25, 1995 on the Original Jazz Classics label. Digitally remastered by Phil De Lancie (1995, Fantasy Studios, Berkeley, California). Jazzical Moods songs Originally recorded for Period Records in 1954, this fairly obscure early Charles Mingus session is a collaboration with composer John LaPorta, who is heard on clarinet and alto saxophone. Jazzical Moods album It’s a fascinating effort that shows Mingus’ awareness of both modern European classical composition and cool jazz. The set includes a mix of Mingus and LaPorta originals, plus freshly arranged standards like……Read More

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Here’s another exploratory album by John Coltrane (Soprano and Tenor Sax) along with the invaluable Eric Dolphy (Alto Sax and Flute), two bassists (Reggie Workman and Art Davis), Freddie Hubbard (Trumpet) and Elvin Jones (Drums). Overall they produce a rather relax sound that doesn’t let up and keeps the listener interested from begging to end. “Ole Coltrane” was recorded, in studio, May 25, 1961 and will be featured for a couple weeks exclusively for the Jazz Con Class listeners. Check the schedule link for play times, enjoy!

About the album:

Having explored all sorts of country cousins of the blues, John Coltrane evokes the spirit of mother Africa and Moorish Spain on this, his final Atlantic recording. Fellow crusaders McCoy Tyner and Elvin Jones are joined by Reggie Workman as well as fellow bass virtuoso Art Davis, while Trane’s new front-line collaborator Eric Dolphy and trumpeter Freddie Hubbard give him an immense sonic canvas upon which to reinvent jazz. OLE COLTRANE extends the forms, anticipating the freedom and far reaching spiritual pilgrimages of the Impulse! years. Miles’ KIND OF BLUE and the music of Ornette Coleman suggested new improvisational possibilities. For Trane, they represented a way out of his harmonic labyrynth, a pursuit of simpler, more expressive modalities–offering even greater rhythmic/melodic complexity. “Ole” is electrifying, one of Coltrane’s greatest collective achievements. Elvin Jones’ hypnotic six-beat cymbal pulse, the strummed ostinatos of Workman and Davis, and Tyner’s murmuring chordal drone form a syncopated wall of sound–equal parts Iberian dance, desert sirocco and evening raga……..Read More

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