From the monthly archives: "May 2012"

While searching through Youtube for Jazz videos to place on my right sidebar, I realized many real long “live” videos available. I figured by using Embedr to display them all in one place, it would be more beneficial for all to watch. I placed an image on the left sidebar like the one above and which is clickable. It will take you to all these outstanding public historical videos that I found to be very educational for all. So if any reader and/or listener of Jazz Con Class would like to visit this mini video library, just click on that image and you will be sent here. ENJOY!

In 1985 there was a memorable reunion of Jazz Masters and it was captured in its entirety on video. It featured 30 and took place in New York’s Town Hall on February 22 of the year 1985. The official name of this Movie/Documentary was “One Night With Blue Note: The Historic All-Star Reunion Concert (1985)

More about the DVD:

One Night With Blue Note CD discography. The Blue Note label is one of the most instantly recognizable labels in the world. Its combination of innovative jazz sounds with a unique sense of style (their album covers are works of art in their own right) has lead to it being the label of choice for several generations of jazz connoisseurs and hipsters. Revived in 1985, the label held a celebratory concert to coincide with their rebirth, hosted at New York’s Town Hall on February 22nd. Artists old and new were featured, including Freddie Hubbard, Herbie Hancock, McCoy Tyner, Cecil Taylor, and many more. This historic all-star reunion concert features top Blue Note label artists, live from New York’s Town Hall on Feb. 22, 1985…..Read More  

Here’s one small example from this historical video that I found on Youtube “Recorda-Me”:

 

Joe Henderson is one of my favorite tenor saxophone players and this 1968 release explains why. But really, the music he was a part of in his whole career as a musician was considered to be great. Either as a band leader or as a band member his contribution was always an innovative one. If I were a Jazz fan, I would purchase as much Joe Henderson as I could, you cannot go wrong. The sound he produced was and of course, is still absolutely inspiring. He was always a hip guy and this feeling transfers to the listener, as is, very hip  and very cool. A great musician for the young inspired Jazz students to follow in their learning experience. I will be featuring the “Tetragon” album for a week or so and then release it into the Avant-Garde Playlist. For airing times go the Schedule Link. ENJOY!

About the Album:

Joe Henderson has been a driving force in the jazz community since the early 1960s. Indeed, his skill and conceptual approach to music helped to define contemporary jazz. Certainly, he greatly influenced the “young lions” of the 1980s, who in turn brought renewed integrity to straight-ahead jazz. This 1968 album sees the tenor saxophonist in fine form. His composition “The Bead Game” is decades ahead of its time; jazz simply doesn’t get any more advanced than the soloing heard here by pianist Don Friedman and Henderson himself. Meanwhile, Jack DeJohnette’s driving eighth notes on the ride cymbal also add great urgency and gusto to this tune……Learn More

About Joe Henderson:

The tenor saxophonist Joe Henderson was born on April 24, 1937 in a small city called Lima Ohio midway between Dayton and Toledo. He spent his childhood and adolescence in Lima in a family of 15 children where he was exposed to a variety of musical styles. By the time he was a high school student he was already arranging and writing music for the school band and other local outfits. It was in high school that a music teacher introduced him to the tenor saxophone. After graduation he enrolled first at the Kentucky State College to study music and then moved on to Wayne State University in Detroit. There he had as classmates several future jazz greats such as Yusef Lateef and Donald Byrd. From 1960-1962 he enlisted in the US army where he led several small jazz groups and won first place in a musical competition and was sent on a tour to entertain the troops all over Japan and Europe where he met a few of the expatriate musicians.

Early career: the Blue Note years

After being discharged from the army he traveled to New York and sat in at Birdland with Dexter Gordon and other local musicians. During one of these sessions he was introduced to the trumpeter Kenny Dorham who was so impressed by his musicianship that he arranged for Joe Henderson’s first recording session as a leader with Blue Note Records. This resulted in the record Page One (1963) which to this day remains one of his most critically acclaimed albums. This recording also spawned the standard Blue Bossa. During the following four years he led 4 other sessions for Blue Note and recorded as sideman on over to 2 dozen albums for the same label. Some of these records are today classics of not only the label but also of jazz music. Andrew Hill’s Point of Departure, Larry Young’s Unity, Horace Silver’s Song For My Father and Lee Morgan’s Sidewinder are just a few examples of those

fruitful years. In addition to creating timeless music Joe Henderson’s style also evolved during this period to incorporate all genres of jazz from hard bop to avant garde from latin to soul-jazz…..Learn More

This is Wayne Shorter’s debut album and you will love it. It’s categorized as a Hard Bop Album and was released in 1959. It was titled “Introducing Wayne Shorter” and can be purchased here. I will later place it in the Hard Bop Playlist. For play times check here in the Schedule Link.

About the Album:

Also known as Blues A La Carte, this Vee Jay disc has tenor-saxophonist Wayne Shorter’s first session as a leader and it shows that, even at this early stage, Shorter was far along toward developing his own sound. Teamed up with trumpeter Lee Morgan, pianist Wynton Kelly, bassist Paul Chambers and drummer Jimmy Cobb, the six selections (five of which are Shorter originals) capture the young tenor shortly after he joined Art Blakey’s Jazz Messengers. The music is essentially hard bop and, although none of these Shorter tunes caught on, the music is quite enjoyable. A special treat is the one standard of the date, a swinging version of “Mack The Knife.”…..Learn More  

The legendary Wayne Shorter has his own website here.

Click to ENLARGE

This is a great story about one of the most important and most historic pictures taken on the subject of Jazz. It was shot in Harlem, New York City on August 12th of the year 1958. It was the most unique picture to see for all Jazz fans living at the time it was taken. For the Jazz fans of today and ones who were born immediately afterwards, it is a treasure. Learn more about this picture, purchase the documentary and grab the poster while you have the chance.

Here’s a great introduction;

“When I found out there was going to be this big meeting for a picture in Esquire,” Dizzy Gillespie recalled, “I said to myself, ‘Here’s my chance to see all these musicians without going to a funeral.’” The mood was indeed far from funereal on that warm Tuesday morn of August 12, 1958, when nearly five dozen jazz artists overflowed the staircase of a Harlem brownstone for an unprecedented group portrait. The “big meeting” was the brainstorm of rookie photographer Art Kane (1925-1995), and proved surprisingly convivial for creatures of the night unused to a 10 a.m. gig. (“A musician at the shoot,” wrote The New Yorker‘s Whitney Balliett, “said he was astonished to discover that there were two 10 o’clocks in each day.”)

Naturally it took a while for the 55 cats and 3 chicks to arrive and exchange greetings, and it’s unclear when everyone was finally in place. For that matter, nobody has the vaguest idea how so many rugged individualists wound up exactly where they did, since no one was directed where to stand. Any groupings, such as drummers in proximity or vocalists next to each other, were entirely fortuitous…..Read More

Part One:

Part Two:

This is not how to watch the documentary, the best way is to go here and purchase it. Not only will you find out how it came to be but you will learn more about the history of Jazz and the great musicians who made it happen. It is a collectors item and you should wrap it up and save it in a safe place. Of course, after you view it and realize how outrages it is. To assemble all these LEGENDS in one place and at the same time is incredible. Just picture yourself in the shoes of Art Kane who took the picture, unbelievable!

Here in Art Kane’s website you can see his image and all the other great pictures he took throughout the years. The poster is located here.

Here’s a great album that all the listeners here on Jazz Con Class will enjoy and appreciate. I will be placing on the rotation for a week or so and then drop it in the Avant-Garde Playlist. For exact times when it will be broadcasting please check the Schedule link, enjoy!

About the Album:

This 1998 CD reissue differs from the original LP in that the immediately distinctive tenor saxophonist Booker Ervin is featured on a previously unreleased four-minute dirge, “Ode to Charlie Parker.” The set matches Ervin with a remarkable rhythm section (pianist Jaki Byard, bassist Richard Davis, and drummer Alan Dawson), plus trumpeter Jimmy Owens and trombonist Garnett Brown (who sometimes takes co-honors). The music is quite moody, soulful, and explorative yet not forbidding…..Learn More

About Booker Ervin:

Booker Ervin had a large hard tone like an r&b tenor saxophonist, but he was actually an adventurous player whose music fell between hard bop and the avant-garde.

Ervin originally played trombone but taught himself the tenor when he was in the Air Force in the early 1950s. After his discharge, he studied music for two years before he made his recording debut with Ernie Fields in 1956. During that year he first performed with Charles Mingus and he was a key part of Mingus’s groups during 1956-1962, offering a contrast to the wild flights of Eric Dolphy.

During 1963-1965, Ervin led ten albums for Prestige and each has its rewarding moments. “Exultation!” matches Ervin with altoist Frank Strozier in an explosive quintet. “The Freedom Book” has Ervin interacting with the unbeatable rhythm section of pianist Jaki Byard, bassist Richard Davis, and drummer Alan Dawson. “The Song Book,” with Tommy Flanagan in Byard’s place, features the intense tenor interpreting a set of veteran standards. “The Blues Book,” with trumpeter Carmell Jones and pianist Gildo Mahones, is comprised of four very different blues and more variety than expected. The Space Book has adventurous improvisations by Ervin, Byard, Davis, and Dawson while Settin’ the Pace features two lengthy and exciting jam-session numbers with fellow tenor Dexter Gordon and a pair of quartet pieces that showcase Ervin……Learn More

If you noticed, there’s an image like the one above located on the left sidebar. Clicking on it will take you to the “Now Playing” Page/link. This will list the song that is “On Air” at the moment and the songs that played before in order. You can go further and investigate how to purchase the song itself or go ahead and buy the Album. I also placed the Jazz Con Class Flash Player there so you can listen to the broadcast while learning more.The great thing about the “Now Playing ” page/Link is that it Updates every 30 seconds!

You don’t necessarily need to click on this image to directly visit the “Now Playing” page, you have the option of using the main menu on top of every page. I hope you enjoy the “Now Playing” Link and most important, the music you hear on the player. Thank you!

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