From the monthly archives: "January 2012"

I shorten the title a touch too short the Official and actual album that I will be featuring is “The Dave Brubeck Quartet at Carnegie Hall” starting Monday January 30th. It can be purchased here. Jazz Con Class will air and broadcast just 4 songs so you can get a good taste of this excellent “Live” album. Check the schedule for play times. This is one of the best Jazz albums you will ever hear! More on album:

For all those who have a big axe to grind with Brubeck, for all those who claim the band was only successful because they were predominantly white, or played pop-jazz, or catered to the exotica craze, or any of that, you are invited to have all of your preconceptions, tepid arguments, and false impressions hopelessly torn to shreds by the CD debut of one of the great live jazz albums of the 1960s. At Carnegie Hall is a date that showcases all of the finest elements of the storied Brubeck Quartet that featured, alongside Brubeck’s piano, alto innovator Paul Desmond, bassist Eugene Wright, and Joe Morello on drums. First the rhythm section: On this February night in 1963 — either the 21 or 22nd depending on which side of the cover you believe — W.C. Handy’s “St. Louis Blues” was given a knotty rhythmic workout it had never seen on Basin or Bourbon Street. Time signatures moved and shifted all over the tune for 12 minutes as Brubeck and Desmond exchanged cross-contrapuntal solos and melodic inventions back and forth. Movement and plenty of it was the identity this old nugget took on, with Brubeck taking Wright’s cue and moving the blues into unheard of harmonic spaces and intervals. At one point, with 16/4 time, forcing itself onto the front line, Desmond makes his move quickly with one scalular interval to the top of the meter and stops……Learn More

The last 24 hours have been very strenuous for me and the listeners. There was a connectivity issue and the stream was pausing in a wild fashion. So I had to look for someone dependable. I looked hard and found a great SHOUTcast server provider and most importantly, with a “Grade A” support of knowledgeable group of technicians. I recommend using HMC for all your needs and the price is right! I also placed a permanent link on the right sidebar to help them find more business, they deserve it!

From the HMC homepage:

Our unlimited SHOUTcast hosting plans are hosted on dedicated servers in Washington, D.C. – Dallas, TX – San Jose, CA – Amsterdam, Netherlands – Zlin, Czech Republic. Each dedicated server has a 1 GigE (1,000 Mbps) connection to the internet. 1,000 listeners servers are setup on each new service. Once the 1,000 listener limit is reached we can set up an additional 1,000 listener relay for no additional fee, just submit a support ticket…..Read More

The Jazz con Class library has a considerable amount of music but there’s so much more that I will be adding. As of right now I have 1800 songs and it might sound like enough but it’s really not. Jazz music is unlimited and it will take forever to gather. So I will be storing and adding Jazz tunes to the playlist for as long as the station is on the air. This is a good start to begin broadcasting and there’s is enough variety present but when repeat listeners begin to crave for more, storage space will need to multiply.

The descriptions of albums you see on the screen when a song is playing (Now Playing) are 90% wrong and are based on “best of” types of albums. I have the original albums, so again, if you are interested in the correct name of the albums then just ask me on the feedback link. The “Jazz Covers” flashing on the right sidebar there are from my collection. I am always adding to it, this is only the beginning.


Hello listeners, how are you doing? I would like for all of you to know that if you are interested in creating a special Jazz podcast(s) and would like for me to play it here on Jazz Con Class, you are always welcomed. The language you use for the podcast doesn’t matter at all. All I ask is to make sure the music complies with the style here. If you listen to the station enough, you would know. I will feature your podcast twice a day for two weeks and then place it on a link where people could listen to it in the future. If you want to feature a playlist or just a single album, it doesn’t matter, as long as it’s good stuff. If you are interested just Contact me here.

I will be Featuring this great album “One Flight Up” also and for an indefinite time. Take a look at the schedule link for times that it will be aired. Dexter Gordon is considered to be one of the best to pick up a tenor sax. Let me send you over to a great website dedicated to him, here. You can purchase the album here.

About the Album:

Gordon takes his time stretching out over the forms, which are particularly drawn out to begin with. Drew’s “Coppin’ the Haven” is a more concise continuation of the effort to reconcile the modal approach with the use of more bop-like changes. “Darn That Dream,” a ballad feature for the leader, is done as a quartet, as is the one Gordon composition “Kong Neptune,” a track not released on the original LP. A particularly interesting aspect of this disc is the chance to hear bassist Niels–Henning Orsted Pedersen making one of his earliest recorded appearances…….Learn More

Beny Moré was arguably the most loved singer-performer in pre-revolution Cuba. The multi-talented Beny Moré was not, by any means, all Cuba has ever been able to muster up, there are so many more. Many have heard of Machito, Mario Bauza, Mongo Santamaria, Chico O’Farrill, Perez Prado, Celia Cruz, Cachao, Bebo Valdez, Paquito D’Rivera, Arturo Sandoval and others because they were able to escape the brutal grip of the totalitarian Castro regime but there are multitude of others who were not as lucky as them and were not unable to flee.

Beny Moré was outstanding, that’s for sure but so was the superiority of Cuban music in the early 50’s and this rare “remastered” album proves it over and over. The album itself is not rare at all, for it is actually a “best of” type of album. The rareness is the fact that it is remastered! Somehow, the great music conservatives have forgotten about the Pre-Castro Cuban Musicians in Cuba. But then again, the Castro regime has not allowed any “Freedom of Expression” in Cuba for the last 52 years.

I will be featuring this album indefinitely on Jazz Con Class so the listeners could learn more about these forgotten musicians. There is more in the works. Check the schedule link to see when it will be airing, Enjoy!

Biography of Beny Moré:

Bartolomé Maximiliano Moré Gutiérrez, 24 August 1919, Santa Isabel de las Lajas, La Villas Province, Cuba, d. 19 February 1963. An outstanding singer (‘his voice was like a bambo in the wind’, said Cuban writer Miguel Barnet in 1984), band leader, composer and arranger, the inimitable Moré, nicknamed ‘El Bárbaro del Ritmo’ (the Barbarian of Rhythm), is still idolized and the subject of tributes nearly three decades after his death. Moré worked with various groups, duos and trios before arriving in Havana in the early 40s. There he performed in the cafes and bars of the capital’s bohemian society; sang with Cuarteto Cordero and Sexteto Cauto and debuted on Radio Mil Diez. In the mid-40s he joined the group of Miguel Matamoros (leader, composer, guitarist, vocalist; writer of the immortal ‘Son De La Loma’ and other classics), with whom he made his recording debut and travelled to Mexico. Matamoros returned to Cuba, but Moré remained and recorded prolifically with the orchestras of Cubans, Mariano Mercerón, Arturo Núñez (with whom he had his first major hit ‘Mucho Corazón’) and Pérez Prado, and Mexican composer Rafael de Paz, among others. With Prado, he toured Mexico and performed at Carnival in Panama.

After his 1950 return to Cuba, Beny worked with the orchestras of Mariano Mercerón (again), Pacho Alonso, Fernando Alvarez and Bebo Valdés. In 1953, Moré organized a 21-piece…..Learn More

I have two announcements to make and both will only expand your listening choice here on Jazz Con Class. First of all I am adding and featuring John Coltrane’s “A Love Supreme” to the schedule, check for times here. It will remain in the Jazz Con Class playlist rotation indefinitely, just as I did with the “Blues Bag” album. More on this inspirational album below.

I am also happy to announce a brand new playlist and I named it the 3G Playlist. It contains songs that I have not played yet here, so again, take a look at the schedule link on top of the page for play time. Make yourself familiar with this link because I am always adding and updating it.

More on Album:

A LOVE SUPREME is the essential example of the genius of John Coltrane. In what has become the apotheosis of jazz music, this eminently accessible work bridges the gap between music and spirituality, between art and life. With the ultimate incarnation of the jazz quartet, Coltrane brings together all of his turbulent elements into a cohesive paean to spirituality, one which is fully appreciable by the uninitiated.

A LOVE SUPREME is a 33-minute work divided into four movements. “Acknowledgment” starts the album with a heraldic summoning from Coltrane’s tenor saxophone, full and joyous, which approximates the tone of the prayer he provides in the album’s liner notes. The solo that follows reveals an artist whose spiritual depth and emotional urgency are matched by an adherence to logic and a resolve to achieve one goal above all–communication. Each simple musical statement is either followed by a motivic development or countered with a conversational response. Coltrane climaxes with a distilled four-note motif echoing the album’s title, which he plays with by sequencing it through a wide array of tonalities. Finally, the band comes in, reiterating this idea, chanting the mantra “A Love Supreme.”…..Learn More

Here’s another excellent album that I will be featuring for an unlimited time with an all-star lineup. I found out about “Blues Bag” while searching for all the albums Lee Morgan had appeared in as a sideman. This album is very expensive, if you are interested in buying it new but it is much cheaper used ($10.24). You can also buy it this way, where it is paired with another great album. Either way, everyone should have it in their music library. Lee Morgan contributes in the 2nd and 7th song but Buddy De Franco’s Bass Clarinet is the main reason why it is so rare. Check the “Schedule Link” to find out when it will be airing. Here’s more on Blues Bag:

Quickly, how many bop-oriented clarinetists came you name? Not many come to mind–seemingly, many players from the bebop-and-beyond generation seem to have associated the clarinet with a bygone jazz era. BLUES BAG, a reissue of a long out-of-print early ’60s Vee-Jay album, is essentially an Art Blakey & The Jazz Messengers lineup with Buddy DeFranco’s clarinet replacing the saxophone.

If at first this seems an odd pairing, remember that DeFranco is one of the generation of jazz players who made the transition from swing to bebop, and both he and Blakey played in big bands, and both were open to the progression of jazz. This set features a pair of old standbys and some early ’60s “brave new jazz” compositions by John Coltrane (the madly catchy “Cousin Mary”), Ornette Coleman (“Blues Connotation”), and some tunes by this session’s pianist/vibes player, the late and very underrated Victor Feldman. DeFranco mostly plays some thorny, thoughtful bass clarinet……….Learn More

 

 

I’m going to feature a special for Duke Ellington, the king himself. I will play this throughout, twice a day and for an unlimited time. Let’s see how it fares, I feel it will go for a long while. It will solely feature on the incredible album, Duke Ellington: The Reprise Studio Recordings. Great album, every song is great, the listeners will love it and will never get bored. Go to the schedule link and see the times, you are bound to catch one. Here’s more on the album:

When Frank Sinatra started his Reprise label in the early ’60s, one of the first artists he approached was Duke Ellington. Nearly 40 years later, as part of the 1999 celebrations of the 100th anniversary of Ellington’s birth, Warner Brothers, which had long since bought and absorbed Reprise, finally released a complete retrospective box set, THE REPRISE STUDIO RECORDINGS.

This five-disc, 101-track collection is fascinating, as Ellington’s Reprise recordings feature probably his greatest stylistic range. This tracks are all over the map, from re-recordings of old Ellington classics, to sometimes-radical rearrangements of gospel and blues standards, to the three-part “Night Monster” suite, to jams with titles like “Non-Violent Integration,” to versions of then-current pop tunes like “Let’s Go Fly a Kite.” Yet somehow, each track is unmistakably Ellington. The box set also includes a full sessionography and extensive liner notes……..Read More 

The other news is on a the NEW “General Three” Playlist which will feature Jazz tunes that have not been played on Jazz Con Class up to now. This is an early warning because it will be the rotation a few days from now. I will add it to the Playlist link soon.

Eldridge, Hawkins and Hodges, three of the greatest Jazz musicians that ever played and all together, LIVE ! The sound they create with Eldridge adding that New Orleans style trumpet loudness to the mix is phenomenal and very unique. The louder they get, the better they sound. This amazing album was recorded live at the Village Gate, New York City on August 13 & 15, 1962.

Read more on the album:

From the mid-’50s until Coleman Hawkins’s death in 1969, the tenor-saxophonist frequently teamed up with trumpeter Roy Eldridge to form a potent team. However, Hawkins rarely met altoist Johnny Hodges on the bandstand, making this encounter a special event. Long versions of “Satin Doll,” “Perdido” and “The Rabbit in Jazz” give these three classic jazzmen (who are ably assisted by the Tommy Flanagan Trio) chances to stretch out and inspire each other. The remainder of this CD has Eldridge and Hodges absent while Coleman Hawkins……Read More

First of all , I would like to start by thanking you so much for passing by and spending time listening to Jazz Con Class. I am working very hard in making sure this internet radio station is not boring and full of surprises. That’s why I am working hard creating more “unique” playlists and that have not been played here before. The other playlists (General, General TWO and Suave) are very large and hold a tremendous amount of music files and I am always refreshing them. I’m working on two more. I should have one of the new playlist ready very soon and the other by the middle of next week.

As for the technical difficulties, I have had a few but they are minor and can be fixed with a little tweaking. Most of the times it has to do with the timing and the prerecorded “intro” files but I have a solution. I’m sorry for this, I hope you understand and have the patience. Jazz con Class has been running 24/7 for only ONE week and there are a few adjustments I still need to make, nothing crucial though. I am “overwhelmed” by the amount of Jazz enthusiasts listening to Jazz con Class and I am listening with them, supporting this inspiring music. I hope we can attract the younger generation, they need to learn more about Jazz. Thanks you again for listening, enjoy!

Just added this album and will be featuring it twice a day for the weekend. I will play all the tracks accept the bonus alternate takes. This is an extraordinary Album and could be the most talented trio ever assembled in a recording studio. Duke Ellington, Charles Mingus and Max Roach! Unbelievable improvising throughout but with total control of format. It’s incredible how they compromise each other in a such a confusing environment. I ran into this album while searching through all of Duke Ellington’s works. I found other great combinations of super stars also and will be featuring them in the near future. Here’s more on the album:

Although this excellent album is listed as a Duke Ellington, equal billing should be given to the participation of Charles Mingus and Max Roach. The remastered CD is outstanding, having been cleaned up from the original master tape. The CD also has the addition of six extra tracks, including four unheard Ellington originals: “Very Special,” “Rem Blues,” “Switch Blade,” and “Backward Country Boy Blues.” He is as at home in the setting of a trio as he is with a wailing big-band, and as usual, he allows the other musicians to play. The trio version of “Caravan” is exceptional, raucous and swinging…Learn More

 

 

Hello fellow listeners! I have updated and added a new specialized playlist. If you go to the “Playlists” link you will see it. The name of the new playlist is “Suave.” Check the times I will be airing it here. I’m adding and moving my music files around in order to organize the radio station and  make it more solid. Much more to come, It’s only going to get better. I am so happy to report that I am receiving so much “Global” support from loyal Jazz enthusiasts. It’s been only a few days that I have gone 24/7 and I am getting a steady theme, thank you!! I will supply a weekly summary of listener statistics so everyone can see how Jazz Con Class is doing.

Note: All the album covers you see throughout this blog are in my music library. I will be adding more album cover images slowly, thanks again for listening and ENJOY!!

VERY IMPORTANT: The albums that are displayed on your music player concerning the “song playing” are most of the times wrong. If you would like the correct and “Original” name of the album the song you are listening to is from just send me a message with (Name and Artist) on the Feedback link.

This will be the album that I will be featuring twice every day so it would be accessible in all times zones. It will be airing in the wee hours (New York Time) but late mourning in Europe. Check Schedule Link  for more times. It is an incredible album that was never planned to be. An All-Star ensemble featuring the Miles Davis Sextet (Miles, Coltrane, Cannonball, Jimmy Cobb, Paul Chambers and Bill Evans) Here’s more:

Back in 1958, Jazz at the Plaza was never meant to be a record; it was a Columbia party at the Plaza, a place jazz had never been played before. Also on the bill were Duke Ellington, Billie Holiday, and Jimmy Rushing. Despite the fine remastering job done by the Sony crew, Jazz at the Plaza remains more a curiosity piece than an essential recording by a remarkable band, strictly because of its dodgy recording quality. The 40-minute set is plagued by the problem of barely being able to hear Davis in places, particularly on the stellar opener, “If I Were a Bell,” and Evans is all but absent on much of the record. In fact, there is no mix; it’s just a flat-out two- or three-mike set. That said, the performance is far from dodgy. There are four tunes in the set: the previously mentioned old stripe from Guys and Dolls; “Oleo,” played at a blistering tempo; “My Funny Valentine,” which, although recorded by Davis’ previous quintet for Prestige, had become a staple in the sextet’s play book; and Monk’s “Straight, No Chaser.” It is perhaps the last that brings the sextet to full bloom in this performance. Davis plays the theme faster than normal, alternating the groove between full and cut time, and Bill Evans goes directly to quoting “Blue Monk” in his own solo. Also notable is the performance of “My Funny Valentine” without the saxophone giants John Coltrane or Cannonball Adderley…...Learn More

 

I want to extend my best wishes of a “Happy New Year” to all the listeners that are helping Jazz Con Class Internet Radio become a reality. I have not been on for 1 week yet and I have a steady stream of listeners already. Nothing big but promising. They are listening from Japan, Thailand, Germany, Canada, Spain, Italy, Romania, Russia, Brazil and of course, the United States. Thank you all for the support, I will continue to keep it as interesting possible. HAPPY NEW YEAR!

I am also placing a podcast (12 Noon to 1:30) New York Eastern Time) I’ve done already in the past (Cubanology Media Blog). I have many and will play them for you every now and then. Enjoy!

Ran into this video today:

css.php